12" Round Craked Completely In Half - Is It A Loss

Decorating By JenLGAJ Updated 21 Nov 2009 , 6:46am by Cakenicing4u

JenLGAJ Posted 20 Nov 2009 , 5:33pm
post #1 of 8

So I rushed flipping my 12" round (first time working with a cake that big) and yep.... its cracked now. Grrr. The crack is major, right in half.

At first I'm thinking no worries, will be fine, but now I'm thinking suck it up and rebake! lol

This 12" needs to support a 10" and 8" stcaked on top.

What do you think?

7 replies
brincess_b Posted 20 Nov 2009 , 5:48pm
post #2 of 8

i think you are fine, just use some bc to stick it back together. try not to stick dowels in the join since it will be a weaker spot - it is the dowels that support the above cakes, so a crack isnt a problem.
xx

BlakesCakes Posted 20 Nov 2009 , 9:52pm
post #3 of 8

I absolutely wouldn't stack anything on top of a cake that has been cracked through and repaired with buttercream. I don't think it's a risk worth taking, unless it's for practice or family, i.e. you really don't care what happens to it.

In the ideal world, anything stacked above it isn't actually being supported by it, BUT, that's only in the ideal world. The stress on the dowels in it from the weight above can cause the crack to open up. Once that happens, the dowels are no longer being "hugged" by the cake, so they have even more room to vibrate & shift when the cake is moved/transported.

There may be no problem, but the least damage may be the crack reappearing in the bottom tier--the worst may be a complete collapse.

Me, I'd re-bake it.

Rae

MrsNancyB1 Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 5:40am
post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

I absolutely wouldn't stack anything on top of a cake that has been cracked through and repaired with buttercream. I don't think it's a risk worth taking, unless it's for practice or family, i.e. you really don't care what happens to it.

In the ideal world, anything stacked above it isn't actually being supported by it, BUT, that's only in the ideal world. The stress on the dowels in it from the weight above can cause the crack to open up. Once that happens, the dowels are no longer being "hugged" by the cake, so they have even more room to vibrate & shift when the cake is moved/transported.

There may be no problem, but the least damage may be the crack reappearing in the bottom tier--the worst may be a complete collapse.

Me, I'd re-bake it.

Rae




I agree with all of this.

crisseyann Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 5:50am
post #5 of 8

I agree with previous posters. I wouldn't take the chance. Bummer icon_sad.gif But hey....cakeball scraps!!!! icon_biggrin.gif

Cakenicing4u Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 6:01am
post #6 of 8

Not a loss at all!! I work in a grocery store, and anything over 10" has to be pieced together, and I've been doing it for years! all of our cakes come in in half sheet size and have to be cut, so I use BC to seal them together and keep on going... I just shift the second layer like you do cardboards... the other direction to help stabilize it!

BlakesCakes Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 6:11am
post #7 of 8

I have no doubt that can work for a dense, pre-frozen slab of grocery cake--are they indeed then doweled and stacked 3 tiers high?

But, in my opinion, comparing a grocery store cake to a homemade cake is like comparing cement to pudding...............

Rae

Cakenicing4u Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 6:46am
post #8 of 8

We use the SPS system or whatever it's called from Bakery crafts... but I've done it with straws grabbed from the Deli cafe area!!

There IS a difference, I agree, but I've done it at home with scratch cakes, and t worked at home too.

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