Urgent, Urgent, Need Answer In Next 30 Mins.

Decorating By Makeitmemorable Updated 21 Nov 2009 , 3:03am by lthiele

Makeitmemorable Posted 19 Nov 2009 , 9:10pm
post #1 of 18

Hi Everyone,

I have a lady coming today to collect a cake - it is a BC covered cake (I have never done buttercream before). It's a pumpkin cake. Question is - when I take it out of the fridge it 'sweats' icon_cry.gif - is this normal?? Can I prevent this? It is 41 degrees in Sydney today. My other question is, should I leave it in the fridge until she collects it or should I try and get it to room temp ? It has fondant accents on it as well.

Thanks in anticipation icon_smile.gif

17 replies
Ruth0209 Posted 19 Nov 2009 , 9:14pm
post #2 of 18

I've never had buttercream sweat, but I have had that problem with fondant. It's condensation that occurs from being taken out of the cold to the warmth.

I think I'd take it out and give it a chance for the condensation to evaporate. Is it arid there or humid? Maybe a fan on it?

Is it 41 C or 41 F? Sorry, most of us Americans don't know how to convert that to a temp we understand. I know, duh...

EDITED TO ADD: I just used a converter on the temp. It's 106 degrees F? Holy crap, no wonder it sweats when you take it out of the fridge. That is hot, hot, hot.

Texas_Rose Posted 19 Nov 2009 , 9:18pm
post #3 of 18

41 C is 105 F

I think I'd leave it in the fridge until she picks up, and tell her to put it in the fridge when she gets home. If you have air conditioning and it's cool in your house, you can take it out and let it come to room temp...but if it's hot and humid in your house, the buttercream will start falling off the cake if it gets too hot.

Ruth0209 Posted 19 Nov 2009 , 9:22pm
post #4 of 18

Looks like you have about 70% humidity. Maybe some CCers who live in humid climates can tell you how long it'll take for the sweating to go away.

ApplegumKitchen Posted 19 Nov 2009 , 9:32pm
post #5 of 18

Its going to get hotter today here in Sydney !!!

Mid 40's - and has been like that for few days - no relief in sight until Sunday maybe!

Fire Alert for 3 states is now - CATASTOPHIC!

Condensation occurs when the variation in the temperatures is GREAT - the temperature in the fridge is way lower than the temp in the room you put it in.
You could have lessened the problem if you had of put the cake in a box and then in the fridge.... but too late for that now

Do you have one room that can be closed off with air-con (you could try getting that room as cool as you can - realising that air-con's can normally only drop the temp outside by 10degrees icon_smile.gif )
GOOD news (for cake) is that humidity is really low (BAD news for fires)

Don't want to alarm you - but think you are going to have problems - does the cake have to travel far? Can they collect late (after the worst of the days heat)? Will it fit in their fridge?

Think very carefully next time about the conditions that we work in (in Australia) - I don't do buttercream (esp in summer) for this very reason.
Too many areas where success cannot be guaranteed
Save yourself the stress and opt for ganache

sugarandslice Posted 19 Nov 2009 , 9:36pm
post #6 of 18

Kim, I agree that you should keep it in the fridge until she gets it then tell her to put it straight in the fridge and warn her that it will sweat on the journey home. Perhaps call her and tell her to bring some freezer blocks with her to put in/under/on the box for in the car?

I know what you mean about the heat. I was up at 4.30 this morning cooking cupcakes just so I didn't have to put the oven on during this hot, hot day. All my baking was done by 6.30am. Yay. Here's hoping my white choc ganache doesn't act up!!

Good luck with the heat!

sweet-thing Posted 19 Nov 2009 , 9:51pm
post #7 of 18

Hope this all works out for you! It is 40 F and raining where I am!

Makeitmemorable Posted 19 Nov 2009 , 9:59pm
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumKitchen



Think very carefully next time about the conditions that we work in (in Australia) - I don't do buttercream (esp in summer) for this very reason.
Too many areas where success cannot be guaranteed
Save yourself the stress and opt for ganache




I cannot agree more with you - this is the only cake I have ever done in buttercream and it was only because she specifically requested it - never again - I am a fondant girl through and through.

Thanks for all the good advice - that is pretty much what I thought you were all going to say, I was just hoping that someone had a miracle idea icon_cry.gif !

I will close off one of the rooms I have with the air/con and put it in there and see how it goes.

Thanks again, you guys, as usual, are terrific.

ApplegumKitchen Posted 20 Nov 2009 , 2:52am
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Makeitmemorable


I cannot agree more with you - this is the only cake I have ever done in buttercream and it was only because she specifically requested it




This is where you need to assert yourself as the decorater and explain to the client WHY you won't do her cake in buttercream - when people specifically request things they often have NO idea..... they just saw a pic in a magazine icon_rolleyes.gif Its our job to educate them.
They will blame YOU the decorater if everything isn't perfect on their cake - they seem to think they can have EVERYTHING- I won't do something that I know might be "more trouble than it is worth" thumbsdown.gif

cabecakes Posted 20 Nov 2009 , 3:10am
post #10 of 18

Make it memorable, I haven't had to deal with temperatures that high, but once this summer I had to deliver a 2 different buttercream iced cakes and made the mistake of putting them in the freezer (newbie mistake) after decorating. The first cake sweat terribly because it went straight from freezer to location's refrigerator. Big mistake, by the time it got there the icing was crackled and was dripping "green food dye blood" all over the place. When I delivered the second, I took it out of the freezer early and straight into refrigerator, from refrigerator to air conditioned room to air conditioned truck, to fridge on location and out to air-conditioned room with no problems. If you can bring it back up to temperature gradually it seems to do much better. These were my experiences anyway. I learned one thing for sure, I will never stick a decorated cake in the freezer again. And at all costs, if possible, will not stick a cake in the fridge unless it has a perishable filling.

Makeitmemorable Posted 20 Nov 2009 , 6:57am
post #11 of 18

Good news icon_smile.gif I placed the cake in an airconditioned room all day and have had no problems. I changed the pick up time with the client - she agreed it would too hot. Hopefully it will make the trip home to her house with out any disasters.

Thanks again for all your help, here is a picture....but dont' think I will ever use buttercream again, I will stick to my fondant and if I get another fuss pot who will only eat buttercream..... I will give her the recipe! LOL

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1521009.html

lthiele Posted 20 Nov 2009 , 10:46am
post #12 of 18

My God Kim - that's your first buttercream cake???!!! icon_surprised.gif It LOOKS like fondant! You are an AMAZING cake artist! Glad it all worked out for you. So much for the ganache part of the equation though - I had my normal ganache out on the bench to use today, went to grab it and it was sploshing around in the bowl, NOT firm AT ALL!!!! It's nearly 10pm and it's still hot! Guess I'm gonna find out tonight if the MMF I make will handle being in the fridge!

Makeitmemorable Posted 20 Nov 2009 , 11:02am
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by lthiele

My God Kim - that's your first buttercream cake???!!! icon_surprised.gif It LOOKS like fondant! You are an AMAZING cake artist! Glad it all worked out for you. So much for the ganache part of the equation though - I had my normal ganache out on the bench to use today, went to grab it and it was sploshing around in the bowl, NOT firm AT ALL!!!! It's nearly 10pm and it's still hot! Guess I'm gonna find out tonight if the MMF I make will handle being in the fridge!




Hey lthiele icon_lol.gif Thanks for your comments - I was EXTREMELY nervous about doing this cake even taking the weather out of the equation - the weather just added a whole new dimension icon_eek.gif . The client loved it and I have not heard from her so hopefully it arrived safely. She didn't pick it up till 8.00pm and it was still 33 degrees. Good luck with the cake tonight, it have just checked and yep, at 10.00pm the weather site says it's still currently 33 degrees! I have no more cakes this week thank goodness, but 3 next week, all fondant of course!

Best of luck again with the ganache and MMF icon_wink.gif

lthiele Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 12:49am
post #14 of 18

Thanks Kim - was up till 3am finishing it and decided to leave it out till pick up so as not to SHOCK it today! Thank goodness the forecast was wrong and nowhere near as hot today!

This is off topic, but can I ask you a question............ do you have any tricks for avoiding air bubbles under your fondant? The last 2 cakes I've done I have had a big bubble appear hours after I smooth my fondant. Luckily I saw the one last night before it cracked and managed to pop it and re-smooth, but I'm wondering if it's how I put the fondant on?? Any tips would be greatly appreciated. icon_biggrin.gif

ApplegumKitchen Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 1:02am
post #15 of 18

Wow - that cake was NOTHING like I expected to see - after all your dramas!! It looks fantastic and shows NO SIGNS of all your stress!!

I never use MMF - mainly because I think the cost of the marshmallows here in Australia don't make it cost effective .... and secondly - I am happy with my current product icon_biggrin.gif

Sometimes an air bubble will occur because you do not have a good 'attachment' of your fondant to your 'cake surface' - thats where your trusty smoother comes into play! If you are using ganache or ??? under your fondant you still need to apply enough pressure to make sure the fondant is adhered everywhere - my theory is a "blow out" is caused by a tiny air bubble trapped between the cake surface and the fondant - it continues to 'grow' because it is basically 'fermenting' using the sugar as food.
HTH

Makeitmemorable Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 2:26am
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by lthiele

This is off topic, but can I ask you a question............ do you have any tricks for avoiding air bubbles under your fondant? The last 2 cakes I've done I have had a big bubble appear hours after I smooth my fondant. Luckily I saw the one last night before it cracked and managed to pop it and re-smooth, but I'm wondering if it's how I put the fondant on?? Any tips would be greatly appreciated. icon_biggrin.gif




I guess there are two types of air bubbles, there are some that get in the fondant which you can just pop with a pin and smooth but you can see most of those before you lay it on the cake hopefully and to avoid these, just make sure you give your icing a good knead.

The other ones under the cake I think are exactly what ApplegumKitchen mentioned, perhaps your icing is not adhering to the ganache on the cake. Do you cover it in ganache and then put it in the fridge? I don't because I want the ganache to be sticky when I lay the fondant but if it sits for a little while or gets refrigerated it tends to dry a little and the fondant won't stick to it. You really do need to smooth the fondant down well to make sure it sticks.

Also, when you lay your fondant over your cake, make sure you lay it on gradually or roll it off the roller onto the cake - it can get air trapped underneath it if you drop it on in one go - hope this make sense icon_rolleyes.gif


Hope this all helps, post a pic so we can see it! thumbs_up.gif

ApplegumKitchen Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 2:57am
post #17 of 18

I let my ganache set up hard - at room temp - you can't push your finger into it - I want it firm so that when I press on the fondant with the smoother it doesn't "squish" the ganache underneath if it is still soft.

I just use one of the spritz type pump packs with a sugar syrup/alcohol mix - give the ganache a LIGHT mist and thats sufficient to get fondant to adhere.

lthiele Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 3:03am
post #18 of 18

Thanks Pam and Kim - that does help. It was kind of the conclusion I had come to that maybe I was not using enough pressure when smoothing. "Fermenting air bubbles" sounds disgusting icon_lol.gif but they definitely grew over time!! I did refrigerate yesterday before doing fondant because of the heat.

MMF is no way any cheaper than bought fondant over here, but have to say I'm a convert for the taste!

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