Do You Charge Extra For

Business By sweetcakes Updated 17 Nov 2009 , 12:21pm by cakesbycathy

sweetcakes Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 5:11am
post #1 of 15

cakes ordered for Christmas day, the day after, or Thanksgiving day or the day after. or any 'holiday' day cake order? Im curious since it would mean baking and decorating on the actual holiday or delivering it.

14 replies
LaBellaFlor Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 5:20am
post #2 of 15

There is no reason why any of those types of orders could not be delivered before the actual holiday, so I don't think I wuld charge extra. Any bakes goods should be fine for a few days. Hope that helps.

tyty Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 5:26am
post #3 of 15

I never bake or decorate on holidays. I might have a few customers pick up cakes the morning of. Most of my Thanksgiving cakes will be picked up or delivered between Monday and Wednesday. Cookies, cakeballs and cheesecakes on Monday, cakes on Tuesday and Wednesday.

sweetcakes Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 5:48am
post #4 of 15

thats try for just regular cakes but what about wedding cakes. i have a consult coming up for a wed. cake for boxing day (dec 26th) which means id be doing it christmas day.

LaBellaFlor Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 5:52am
post #5 of 15

Dang, you got someone who celebrates Boxing Day in Texas? icon_confused.gif Yeah, I guess I mite charge extra. I mean it is Christmas after all. But I'm not sure what you should chage, as I know I wouldn't take an order that requires me to work on the actual holiday. I just wouldn't have time.

CakeMommyTX Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 6:15am
post #6 of 15

What's boxing day?

Mensch Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 6:19am
post #7 of 15

Boxing Day is December 26. Bank holiday in UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and countries in the Commonwealth of Nations with a mainly Christian population.

Its a secular holiday, and not always the 26. If the 26th is a Saturday, for example, Boxing Day is moved to Monday.

Texas_Rose Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 6:21am
post #8 of 15

When I was a kid and I read about it, I always thought it was when you box up all the stuff you didn't like and take it back...because that's what my family did the day after Christmas icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif

CakeMommyTX Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 6:27am
post #9 of 15

Ok I googled it, so it's basically like Black Friday but after Christmas instead of Thanksgiving, which would make sense because we are the only ones who celebrate Thanksgiving.

LaBellaFlor Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 6:28am
post #10 of 15

Exactly what Mensch said. It's on the 26th of Dec., because thats when all the servants were able to celebrate Christmas after waiting on the rich Christmas Day. My British girlfriend is more excited about Boxing Day then Christmas.

Texas-Rose, you are HILARIOUS!

indydebi Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 6:30am
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

When I was a kid and I read about it, I always thought it was when you box up all the stuff you didn't like and take it back...because that's what my family did the day after Christmas icon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gificon_biggrin.gif




Ok, this is hysterical! This one should go on the "silliest thing you ever had to ask or figure out" thread! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

(although along these lines .... there was a restaurant in our town called The Elbow Room and I thought it served nothing but macaroni! icon_redface.gif )

kaseyrconnect Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 6:59am
post #12 of 15

indydebi and Texas_Rose , you make me laugh.

miasuzzette Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 7:50am
post #13 of 15

Hi, to all..indydebi, Nice Picture, thumbs_up.gif

MikeRowesHunny Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 8:54am
post #14 of 15

OK as a British native, I really need to clear up the Boxing Day thing because you all have it wrong! Boxing Day is ALWAYS the 26th December, the only difference is is that if it falls on a weekend, you also get the Monday off work too as the Bank Holiday. Boxing Day is called as such because the day after Christmas long ago in places like the UK, the servants would receive their Christmas 'boxes' (a bit of extra money, food, gifts etc)., from their employers and be allowed to go home to see their families that day (if they were local), after serving the family breakfast. They would leave cold-cuts etc for the rest of the day so the rich folk didn't starve. HTH!

cakesbycathy Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 12:21pm
post #15 of 15

I don't work on a holiday or Christmas Eve. The day after doesn't matter to me (but I don't celebrate Boxing day). If a customer wants a cake for Christmas they can pick it up or I am more than happy to deliver it on the 23rd. The cake will be fine.

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