Gingerbread Men Help!

Baking By tatiana0111 Updated 17 Nov 2009 , 8:32pm by ziggytarheel

tatiana0111 Posted 16 Nov 2009 , 10:50pm
post #1 of 9

I have to make 200 gingerbread men for an annual program at my high school called the Christmas Difference, which is a big Christmas celebration we have for the less fortunate kids in our county. There's pictures with Santa, picture frame making, a few other things, and a station where you decorate your own gingerbread men. So I need help because I've never made ginger bread men. THIS IS WHAT I NEED: A good recipe that won't make super hard and crunchy cookies, the yield (preferably large) & any tips on making them, cause this is my first time. I'm thinking of renting a commercial kitchen to save electricity in my parents home. ALSO- how much should i charge? I was thinking $100 but i dunno yet.

-Thanks <3

8 replies
LaBellaFlor Posted 16 Nov 2009 , 11:08pm
post #2 of 9

a $100 for 200 cookies?! that's .50 a cookie. Will that cover your cost? Anyway, what noticed about gingerbread cookies, they tend to be real crispy if you roll them too thin. If you roll them a little thicker like a 1/4" (I'm guesstimating here) you should have a firm enough cookie that holds it shape, but not crispy. I love gingerbread men cookies and it is Christmas time! icon_biggrin.gif

tatiana0111 Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 3:32am
post #3 of 9

im just always afraid of over charging. what would you suggest?

LaBellaFlor Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 3:47am
post #4 of 9

An average cookie goes for $3.00. I know another person on here, who I believe does a lot of cookies say that a base price for a cookie is a $1 per inch with additional cost for design. And never, ever, ever, ever,ever...ever,ever,ever...dod I mention ever be afrid of overcharging. Figure out your cost, get your pricing together (and some of those cost are your electriciyt, gas, cause you got to go to the store, your phone, etc.,etc., and MOST importantly, yet always overlooked, you labor cost. Yup, don't you want to get paid. So as you can see your cost IS NOT just your ingredients) and price appropiately. I notice that peopel who tend to be concerned about over charging, tend to be the ones that seriously undercharge.

wow. Do I know how to go back & forth from topics or what?! icon_biggrin.gif

ceshell Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 7:33am
post #5 of 9

This recipe for gingerbread cookies is SOOOOO good. Normally I don't like g. cookies, they're crispy and the flavor is just uninteresting to me. These cookies remain soft and have the most amazing flavor! However, I do follow the user suggestions to double the spices and triple the ginger. People will LOVE them. Normally I don't eat it if it ain't chocolate, but I cannot keep my hands off of these icon_smile.gif http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Gingerbread-Snowflakes-107445

ziggytarheel Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 10:42am
post #6 of 9

I'm a little confused. Are these cookies for the kids, or is this a fundraiser FOR the kids?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ceshell

This recipe for gingerbread cookies is SOOOOO good. Normally I don't like g. cookies, they're crispy and the flavor is just uninteresting to me. These cookies remain soft and have the most amazing flavor! However, I do follow the user suggestions to double the spices and triple the ginger. People will LOVE them. Normally I don't eat it if it ain't chocolate, but I cannot keep my hands off of these icon_smile.gif http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Gingerbread-Snowflakes-107445




Have you frozen these before? I was thinking about either baking and freezing, or cutting out and freezing some gingerbread cookies. I quite often cut out and freeze cookies, but I didn't know if gingerbread would be a problem.

bbmom Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 11:43am
post #7 of 9

Gingerbread freezes just fine, but the beauty of gingerbread is that it has so many spices that it doesnt go stale, thats why it was so popluar wayyyy back. I make dozens of gingerbread cookies every year to hang on our christmas tree starting right after Thanksgiving, they stay on the tree right until Christmas and my family eats them right off the tree all season. Gingerbread can be baked less for a softer cookie or longer for a harder cookie. I usually agree with the $ per inch for a sugar cookie, but gingerbread is more expensive to make than a sugar cookie due to all the molasses, cinnamon, cloves, ginger etc. I would price out a batch before I quoted. At Santa's Village-an amusement park we go to they sell really big (5-6" I'd say) gingerbread men-undecorated so the kids can decorate them- and they are $5each.

ceshell Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 7:07pm
post #8 of 9

I've never frozen this recipe but I'd be surprised if that would present a problem. I'd go with bbmom's advice and say yes you can icon_wink.gif. As a matter of fact I might try it myself, I'm already starting to panic about holiday baking icon_rolleyes.gif.

ziggytarheel Posted 17 Nov 2009 , 8:32pm
post #9 of 9

Thanks!

I'm either ahead or behind, never on time. I'm going for ahead this year!

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