Ultimate Cake Off: Circus Spectacular & Caulking Gun

Decorating By Polkadot79 Updated 16 Nov 2009 , 1:20am by BlakesCakes

Polkadot79 Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 3:02am
post #1 of 17

Do any of you use a caulking gun as a fondant extruder like the team in the episode does? If so, can you explain the different parts. I didn't rewind since it takes the episode forever to load again.

16 replies
__Jamie__ Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 1:16pm
post #2 of 17

Caulking gun? A real honest to God caulking gun. I doubt that was what you saw. I don't remember the specifics of that episode, but I'm pretty sure it was an extruder. Like this:http://cn1.kaboodle.com/hi/img/2/0/0/11f/4/AAAAAjgEWXIAAAAAAR9K7A.jpg

Or like this: http://www.baileypottery.com/images/C-090-IKEG.jpg

arosstx Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 1:36pm
post #3 of 17

I saw that episode, and it really was a caulking gun. The only reason I know is because he was so proud of it, and they did a short spot on how he was using it. I want to re-watch it next time it's on because I thought that was such a great idea!

arosstx Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 1:39pm
post #4 of 17

Thinking about it more, I remember he used a length of pvc pipe about the size of a tube of caulk, had probably a screw-on cap for the end, and some type of ring or fitting on the front so that he could put disks in that would change how the fondant comes out. Not sure that made sense, but I can "see" it in my head. Kind of like those squeezy cookie makers where you put the dough in the tube and squeeze out cookies through different shape disks. Probably best to see the episode again! icon_smile.gif

sadsmile Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 1:45pm
post #5 of 17

I saw that and it was a PVC tube and end caps in a real caulking gun. They had drilled a hole in the end cap and said something like it had way more power then a normal extruder and you can make your own and try drilling different size holes for different size ropes.

__Jamie__ Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 1:46pm
post #6 of 17

Oh wow! That's cool then!

Enchantedcakes Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 2:27pm
post #7 of 17

here is a short video on how to make one for use with clay, just replace the clay with fondant. http://ceramicartsdaily.org/ceramic-studio-equipment/clay-extruders/video-tip-of-the-week-make-your-own-hand-held-clay-extruder/

Polkadot79 Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 9:17pm
post #8 of 17

Yes, it was a caulking gun with PVC. Thanks for the link to make one...I'm gonna get my brother to get onto that lil' project. =D

BlakesCakes Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 9:58pm
post #9 of 17

For $35, you can get a nice, large extruder that comes with multiple disks. You can also get extra disks.

http://www.sculpt.com/catalog_98/CLAYTOOLS/extruder.htm

I'm guessing that by the time you invest in all the stuff for the caulking gun rendition, the costs would be about the same. You can buy blank dies and drill them for any shapes or # of holes that you require.

Rae

arosstx Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 10:03pm
post #10 of 17

Caulking gun is about $3 at home depot, 2 ft length of pvc pipe to cut is less than $2, and the test caps are about .25 cents each! The most you would pay to put this together is around $10.

Polkadot79 Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 10:07pm
post #11 of 17

I have one of the lil small green clay extruders, but it takes so much effort at times to push the fondant/gumpaste out.

On the show, he was boasting about how much stronger the caulking gun was so I thought that sounded pretty great (and even better if it's cheaper!).

BlakesCakes Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 10:20pm
post #12 of 17

For a smaller clay gun--I very rarely need the really large one--I prefer the Makins Ultimate Clay Extruder.

It's green aluminum with a "T" twist handle. You can find it online if you use google to search. It comes with tons of disks and you can buy extras. It's very easy to use and clean.

No matter what type of small extruder you use, you need to knead in lots of crisco to get it to work well. If the fondant is the consistency of chewed chewing gum, you'll have easy work and a nice product.

As for making a larger gun, my logic is simple--I value my time at no less than $10/hr., so if it will take me 2 hours to make and fine tune something & the raw materials are about $10 vs. a pre-made product for $30-$35--I'll buy it and save myself the time and aggravation. This thinking extends to fondant, too--with the mess and time involved in making it, I buy it.

Rae

HamSquad Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 10:45pm
post #13 of 17

Hey,
For some you who have a old Wilton Cookie extruder for sprintz cookies, it works about the same. That is what I have been using since trying that small metal one. I have bad wrists from years of typing at work . This has been great for occassional use and something else to use my cookie gun for!
Just a Thought
Hammy icon_biggrin.gif

Polkadot79 Posted 15 Nov 2009 , 10:20pm
post #14 of 17

I have a Pampered Chef cookie press. I had the idea last week to try and use it with fondant, but wasn't sure it would work...will definitely try it now!

Adding Crisco to my fondant/gumpaste worked wonders this week with the lil green clay extruder I have (bought for about $5 off ebay).

moydear77 Posted 15 Nov 2009 , 11:13pm
post #15 of 17

Yep! It was a caulking gun. I saw it with my own eyes during the competition icon_smile.gif Roland is a cake genius and I am so glad to have met him!
I remember looking over while we were shooting the episode and thinking how clever!

JustToEatCake Posted 16 Nov 2009 , 12:24am
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

For a smaller clay gun--I very rarely need the really large one--I prefer the Makins Ultimate Clay Extruder.

It's green aluminum with a "T" twist handle. You can find it online if you use google to search. It comes with tons of disks and you can buy extras. It's very easy to use and clean.

No matter what type of small extruder you use, you need to knead in lots of crisco to get it to work well. If the fondant is the consistency of chewed chewing gum, you'll have easy work and a nice product.

As for making a larger gun, my logic is simple--I value my time at no less than $10/hr., so if it will take me 2 hours to make and fine tune something & the raw materials are about $10 vs. a pre-made product for $30-$35--I'll buy it and save myself the time and aggravation. This thinking extends to fondant, too--with the mess and time involved in making it, I buy it.

Rae



I checked this out and it's 35.00 plus shipping (probably at least $10.00, I wasn't going to sign up for their website to find out exactly, AND they charge a 5.00 handling fee. So pretty much it's going to cost you about 50.00.

For those that are handy or have handy creative people in their families this won't be hard to make and in fact would be fun...besides I'm cheap and I like it like that. The time I spend making something like this is fun AND I am very proud of it when I am finished and if it breaks, no biggie or I want to make more of them for friends it's no biggie once you make one. For those in a rush and spend all their time making cakes (or whatever they do) I can understand but most of us spend more than 3 hours a week (sometimes a day) in front of the TV and I don't charge for that...lol..maybe I should.

BlakesCakes Posted 16 Nov 2009 , 1:20am
post #17 of 17

Ummmmmmmmm, OK...............I'll concede that my post is only for those who aren't handy, those who do place a $ value on their time , and for those who prefer a pre-made/standardized product....

The example I posted is actually awfully large.

On a more practical side, there is a smaller one (holds 1.5 lbs.). If you scroll down to the 3rd item on the page, it's $21.95 plus shipping+handling (to 44143) is $7.38, for a grand total of $29.33---VOILA--under $30.

http://www.clay-king.com/extruderlist.htm

Just for those of us who aren't Handy Hannahs.......
Rae

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