Should I Follow Up?

Business By cakesbycathy Updated 14 Nov 2009 , 12:29am by globalgatherings

cakesbycathy Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 10:32pm
post #1 of 13

So on Tuesday I got a call requesting a 6" round white cake with buttercream filling and frosting for today. She asked that the cake be completely undecorated.
Turns out her friend is getting married and the office was having a taste testing party. They ordered the exact same thing from 4 other bakeries. They were going to slice up the cakes and not tell anyone which bakery they came from. They wanted to judge the cakes completely on taste.

Now I actually thought this was a pretty cool idea. Plus it was maybe the easiest $30 I ever made caking, but that's besides the point icon_biggrin.gif

Anyway, when she came to pick up the cake I also gave her a certificate for a free tasting and consultation, plus my menu with my flavors and prices and the information sheet I mail to prospective brides. I put it all plus some business cards in a sealed envelope and told her when she picked up the cake that she could open it if she chose me. Otherwise she could either pass it on to another bride or just throw it away or whatever.

So now I am wondering - should I follow up with a phone call to see what they thought?

12 replies
Barb1959 Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 10:36pm
post #2 of 13

I think you should. You never know, there could be a question that you could answer for her that might clentch the deal. Good luck!

-K8memphis Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 11:40pm
post #3 of 13

I vote no.

LaBellaFlor Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 1:49am
post #4 of 13

I say no as well. You've given them all the info. they need. if they want you they will get back to you.

CakeForte Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 2:08am
post #5 of 13

One of the main rules in sales is to ask for the sale. You need to follow up to get that sale. Don't be passive, you have nothing to lose.

all4cake Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 2:09am
post #6 of 13

Awesome idea! Get 'er dun all at once!

I would opt not to contact for the same reasons as previously posted.

alvarezmom Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 9:39pm
post #7 of 13

I would say not to call her. You have given her all of your info. They might not have even tasted the cakes yet. Just wait and let them think about it over the weekend.

tootie0809 Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 11:23pm
post #8 of 13

I also say no followup. Might seem a little desperate, which I am sure your are not, but what if they did the tasting and chose another bakery? Some people would find it very uncomfortable to have to explain that to someone on the spot, so I would say leave it in their court. They have all your contact information and will get in touch with yout if they want to.

sadsmile Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 11:39pm
post #9 of 13

But as a professional wouldn't you want to know why they chose someone else? I think I would. if you could ask nicely without implying disappointment and keep emotions out of it I think the answer might be helpful. It would help you determine if you needed to make changes to your recipes, prices, workmanship or if they were just not a good client match for your services.

jammjenks Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 11:43pm
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tootie0809

I also say no followup. Might seem a little desperate, which I am sure your are not, but what if they did the tasting and chose another bakery? Some people would find it very uncomfortable to have to explain that to someone on the spot, so I would say leave it in their court. They have all your contact information and will get in touch with yout if they want to.




I agree with this.

vagostino Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 11:57pm
post #11 of 13

I think you should ask, like sadsmile said, keep it professional and non-emotional. I think it speaks to your professionalism to follow up. It shows you care about your business.
You can say something like "I hope you enjoyed the cake, please let me know if I can assist you any further, and congratulate her again on her upcoming wedding or something like that.
Nothing about "did you like my cake, why didn't you choose me" or anything like that!

Edited to add: send her a note or email, not a phone call so she doesn't feel cornered...

jmr531 Posted 14 Nov 2009 , 12:03am
post #12 of 13

I vote yes. Whether they have or haven't chosen you, what do you have to lose? As long as you are polite and ask nicely as suggested by a previous poster, it couldn't hurt.
If you prefer not to call, perhaps you can send the customer an email if you have her email address. That way, she can choose to ignore it if she wants to.

globalgatherings Posted 14 Nov 2009 , 12:29am
post #13 of 13

from a person that's been in the food business for 30 years, " FOLLOW UP" any way you can, email, phone, whatever you are more comfortable with. People don't always choose me to cater their functions, but I always try to find out why. As stated in a previous post, answers to those questions can only help you improve your business, and, as also stated above, try to keep the emotion out of it.

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