Freezing The Cake? How?

Decorating By keflyn Updated 13 Nov 2009 , 2:39pm by FierceConfections

keflyn Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 10:07pm
post #1 of 16

I am in love with this idea, but....how do I do it? I don't frost it do I? when do I put the cake in the freezer? do I keep it in the cake pan? do I wrap it( as opposed to tupperware)? how long can it sit there? how long do I let it rest? does it really taste fine?

15 replies
Cakepro Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 10:37pm
post #2 of 16

Bake cake.

Cool 10 minutes in pan.

Turn out onto wire rack.

Cool to room temperature.

Level and torte cake if desired.

Wrap cooled cake in plastic wrap.

Wrap cake again in foil.

Place in freezer.

When you are ready to use the cake, allow it to thaw on counter top, fully wrapped, for a few hours.

Unwrap, ice, decorate, enjoy.

It's that easy, and yes, it really tastes fine.

keflyn Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 10:42pm
post #3 of 16

thank you!

CarolAnn Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 10:56pm
post #4 of 16

Very concise. Thank you Sherri!

wyovol Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 3:03am
post #5 of 16

I froze cakes for the first time a couple of weeks ago and they turned out beautifully -- very moist and tasty. My husband was very doubtful about the freezing, but he admitted that the cake was delicious. thumbs_up.gif

erin12345 Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 8:35pm
post #6 of 16

I also crumb coat my cakes in addition to leveling before freezing. I try not to bake and freeze more than 1- 2 weeks in advance. Always tastes great!

sarkee Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 8:51pm
post #7 of 16

agree with everyone above. do it all the time. matter of fact....the frozen cakes are said to taste better (moistness) than fresh. matter of opinion though. try it......

LeckieAnne Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 8:55pm
post #8 of 16

I wrap mine with glad press-n-seal freezer wrap and never freeze for more than three or four days and they're always great. I also wrap them while they are still warm - as soon as they're cool enough to handle. I put the layers on cake boards with parchment paper on top and bottom cut the cake size - then wrap.

JustToEatCake Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 9:25pm
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeckieAnne

I wrap mine with glad press-n-seal freezer wrap and never freeze for more than three or four days and they're always great. I also wrap them while they are still warm - as soon as they're cool enough to handle. I put the layers on cake boards with parchment paper on top and bottom cut the cake size - then wrap.




And your cakes don't sweat? I mean obviously they don't or you wouldn't be doing it, but I can't understand how. Do you have alot of moisture when you take the cake out to thaw and frost?
Thanks

LeckieAnne Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 10:29pm
post #10 of 16

I just let them completely thaw while still wrapped, and they're never sticky or anything. The sweating is on the outside of wrapping. So when I unwrap, the cake is fine.

jenng1482 Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 10:41pm
post #11 of 16

Sherri and LeckieAnne suggested just exactly as I would have. The only thing I have to add is that I tort before freezing and place a piece of wax paper between each layer and then wrap the entire thing.

LeckieAnne Posted 12 Nov 2009 , 10:49pm
post #12 of 16

I bake three layers instead of two and don't torte - I hate torting! LOL
I just wrap and freeze them all seperately.

prterrell Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 3:50am
post #13 of 16

I had a left-over layer of chocolate cake once that I had frozen in our deep freezer and forgotten about. Found over a year later when doing the annual deep freezer purge. We thawed tha cake and it was delicious. You'd never kinow it'd been buried in the back of the freezer for all those months.

khoudek Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 2:08pm
post #14 of 16

I do mine like cakepro, except I level them after they have been frozen....take them out and thaw them a bit so the knife goes through them better. I've found this is less crumbly, especially for softer cakes. Also, I've discovered Press and Seal. Love this stuff as it hugs everything it touches so no chance of air getting to the cake. I use it instead of cling wrap and I wrap my boards in it too.

luddroth Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 2:23pm
post #15 of 16

What happens if you freeze a fondant-covered cake and let it thaw gradually fully wrapped? I ask because I am contributing a fully-decorated cake to a holiday fundraiser the first week in December and people want to know if they can freeze the cake for a couple of weeks and then use it at Christmas. I'm guessing the fondant (I use Pettinice) will be drier and firmer than it should be, but if it thaws wrapped, the condensation problem might be avoided and it could be ok. What happens to all those top-tiers of wedding cakes that people thaw for their first anniversary?

FierceConfections Posted 13 Nov 2009 , 2:39pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by luddroth

What happens if you freeze a fondant-covered cake and let it thaw gradually fully wrapped? I ask because I am contributing a fully-decorated cake to a holiday fundraiser the first week in December and people want to know if they can freeze the cake for a couple of weeks and then use it at Christmas. I'm guessing the fondant (I use Pettinice) will be drier and firmer than it should be, but if it thaws wrapped, the condensation problem might be avoided and it could be ok. What happens to all those top-tiers of wedding cakes that people thaw for their first anniversary?




I've never tried freezing a fondant covered cake, but I imagine that you wouldn't want to have anything touching the fondant as it's coming to room temperature because of the amount of condensation. Otherwise it seems like the plastic wrap would stick to the fondant and cause a lot of damage.

Now, I've refrigerated tons of fondant covered cakes and I've never had a problem with them. I just take them out of the fridge and allow them to come to room temperature before touching them. Usually there is some condensation, but it evaporates on its own and has yet to leave any marks.

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