Rounded Edges

Decorating By pieceofcake20 Updated 7 Jan 2010 , 7:27pm by pieceofcake20

pieceofcake20 Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 7:59pm
post #1 of 9

Can anyone tell me how to get good crisp clean edges on my cakes (round or square)? When I use MMF it tends to weigh down the top edge and give my cakes a rounded appearance. How can I prevent this?

8 replies
__Jamie__ Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 8:02pm
post #2 of 9

Thinner fondant, and/or apply your fondant to an already sharply iced buttercream cake that has been chilled very firmly. Use two fondant smoothers at once to really define those edges.

pieceofcake20 Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 8:31pm
post #3 of 9

Thanks. Do you take your cake straight out of the fridge and apply fondant to it? Do you spritz with water first? How long do you chill it? Sorry for all the questions.

DianeLM Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 8:53pm
post #4 of 9

I apply a coat of spackle (cake crumbs mixed with bc) to a chilled cake, then stick it in the freezer until it's pretty firm. The length of time will depend on the size of the cake. You don't want it frozen solid, tho.

When the cake is this firm, you can really be aggressive with your smoothing and edge defining without worrying about crushing the cake.

As the cake thaws, the condensation will help the fondant adhere, so no spritzing. And by the time the cake completely thaws the fondant has set up and shouldn't droop.

__Jamie__ Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 8:57pm
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by DianeLM

When the cake is this firm, you can really be aggressive with your smoothing and edge defining without worrying about crushing the cake.




Exactly.

Rylan Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 9:00pm
post #6 of 9

I agree with the above posters.

You can also use ganache under--it will be easier for you to achieve sharp corners. When I use it, I can't tell the difference which is a dummy and which is not.

pieceofcake20 Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 9:57pm
post #7 of 9

So, when you put the "spackle" on do you get it as smooth as you can then stick in the freezer? Once you take it out how do you "finish" the smoothing process? One time I did try to put my in the freezer for a few minutes (about 15 i think) but after i put my fondant on, it cracked. I assumed the cold from the cake and the warm of the fondant caused it. Since then i've been too scared to put the cake in the freezer.

DianeLM Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 11:20pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by pieceofcake20

So, when you put the "spackle" on do you get it as smooth as you can then stick in the freezer? Once you take it out how do you "finish" the smoothing process? One time I did try to put my in the freezer for a few minutes (about 15 i think) but after i put my fondant on, it cracked. I assumed the cold from the cake and the warm of the fondant caused it. Since then i've been too scared to put the cake in the freezer.




Yes, get the spackle as smooth as you can. This is the finish the fondant will follow. Sometimes I nuke my spackle for a few seconds to give it a longer work time before it starts to 'freeze' on the cake. It's pretty loose when it goes on, but freezes hard.

I can't stress enough how you ONLY WANT TO FREEZE THE OUTSIDE of the cake. Start with a room temp cake and place it in the freezer for 15-25 minutes depending on the size of the cake and how fragile it is (e.g. I freeze chocolate longer than white).

Apply spackle, then stick back in the freezer for 15 minutes for a small cake and up to 45 minutes for a large cake.

If you're covering a large cake, leave it in the freezer while you roll out the fondant. A small cake you can take out before you roll the fondant. You just don't want the cake to start to thaw before you get the fondant on.

Lay the fondant on your chilled cake and smooth as usual. Use a smoother for the top and top edge, then smooth down the sides and trim. The nice thing about the frozen spackle is that it's pretty dry at first so you have time to lift and smooth any pleats or other nasties before it starts to stick.

Another advantage to the spackle being dry at first is if you accidentally mess up the placement of your fondant (which never happens to anyone, right? hehehe) you can lift it off with minimal mess.

Once the thawing process starts and condensation forms on the outside of the fondant, STOP TOUCHING IT. So, you have to work kinda fast. So, no answering the phone, going to the bathroom, putting out grease fires after the fondant hits the cake. You've got to finish it RIGHT THEN AND THERE. icon_smile.gif

I have never had my fondant crack for any reason. I can't imagine why that happened to you.

Please keep in mind that I'm talking about regular fondant. I have never worked with MMF.

pieceofcake20 Posted 7 Jan 2010 , 7:27pm
post #9 of 9

just though i'd give an update. Thanks for all the tips. This technique has helped me out tremendously. Thank you all!!!!!!!!!!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%