Help With Invoice Please : )

Decorating By jules06 Updated 10 Nov 2009 , 9:56pm by sugarandslice

jules06 Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 11:31pm
post #1 of 17

This is probably a very simple thing but not having done invoices for my cakes before, I'm a bit unsure of what it entails.
I have an order for 50 xmas cupcakes packaged in clear boxes ( which I am providing ) - do I just list the price for each cupcake & then multiply by the total amount or itemise everything ?

For eg : cupcake - $z.00

fondant dec - $x.00

packaging - $ y.00

labour - $ w.00

Subtotal - $m.00 x 50

Total - $ xyz.00


Thanks icon_biggrin.gif

16 replies
Barb1959 Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 11:53pm
post #2 of 17

I have an invoice that I use that is really simple. Granted they are only for cake balls, but I started out at top with a place to put the customer, phone number date ordered dated needed and comments. I then made a table that had columns for Amt, type of cake, special coatings, etc., and then the price and then I total it at bottom. I do not think you would want to put in packaging, labor, etc. that is all a part of the cost of the item.

Hope this helps. If you pm me I can forward a copy of the invoice. I have it on my work computer and I am at home now.

indydebi Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 12:06am
post #3 of 17

Do you REALLY want them going thru the invoice complaining "She charged HOW MUCH just to decorate a lousy cupcake? Are you kidding that a little box costs THAT much?" If you nickel and dime the invoice, they will find a way to nickel and dime you with complaints. Just keep it simple.

Invoice:

100 cupcakes @ $3.50 each = $350.00

That's all they need.

jules06 Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:18am
post #4 of 17

Thanks indydebi & Barb1959 - I was just going to put the cupcake price x $amount but wasn't sure if that would be enough detail !!

Thanks for your advice ! icon_biggrin.gif

Mencked Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:30am
post #5 of 17

I agree with Debi's approach--keep it simple icon_smile.gif!

sugarandslice Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:46am
post #6 of 17

Sorry but I have to disagree. I give clients (admittedly I haven't done a lot, maybe 15 or so) a somewhat detailed invoice including number of hrs @ $x/hr and everyone has said how much they appreciate knowing where their money is going. If I just handed them a final $ figure, I think they would baulk at it. This way they know how many hours I'm putting into their cake and they can understand how much work is involved.
Jules06, if you'd like an example PM me with your email address and I'll get it to you asap.

indydebi Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:56am
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarandslice

Sorry but I have to disagree. I give clients (admittedly I haven't done a lot, maybe 15 or so) a somewhat detailed invoice including number of hrs @ $x/hr and everyone has said how much they appreciate knowing where their money is going. If I just handed them a final $ figure, I think they would baulk at it. This way they know how many hours I'm putting into their cake and they can understand how much work is involved.
Jules06, if you'd like an example PM me with your email address and I'll get it to you asap.




The problem with that is that some people (not all, but some) will be shocked at what your time is worth.

Example: A photog friend quoted $500 for 5 hours of wedding photography. The groom snorted and said, "no one but my lawyer is worth $100/hour." Friend pointed out that "the time you see me at the wedding is not the only time I'm spending on your pictures." Also reminded him that the price included his photos and the album, etc.

I get it on the catering side. People want to argue when I bill them for 8 hours per person because their reception isn't 8 hours long. Hey, nitwit, just how long do you think it takes to cook food for 200 people, load the van, drive for 45 minutes,unload the van, etc etc.

I tell them, "We dont' start work when you walk in the door. By the time you get there, we've already put in 6 to 10 hours worth of work, depending on when the person shows up for their shift."

dumbasses.

cakegrandma Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:58am
post #8 of 17

I agree that the invoice should have the customers name, date needed and what was ordered with a final total. This should be sufficient, I don't feel that the client needs to know that you spent 5 hours on decorating at x amount of dollars or x amount of dollars on boxes. Do they really care? Probably not, they just want their items at the amount agreed upon and to look like they stated. Besides, why go through all that work when you could be doing another order? HTH.
evelyn

indydebi Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:58am
post #9 of 17

Footnote to the above. We have the same thing going on right here on CC. There is a photo of a cake covered with rose petals and a debate on how long it takes. One CC'er found the site of the baker who made the cake and it said it took 4 people 2 days to make the cake.

We had CC'er doing the "Oh come on! It can't take that long to make that cake!" We live and breath cake, yet we are on here questioning the actual time a baker spent on a cake. icon_confused.gif

Cake civilians think it's a 30 minute bake job, then slap some icing on it.

LaBellaFlor Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 3:00am
post #10 of 17

wow. I thought $500 dollars for 5 hours from a professional photographer is REALLY cheap! HEck, I paid $1700 for all day service...and THAT is considered a bargain.

indydebi Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 3:04am
post #11 of 17

It is really cheap, which is why the groom's comment was doubly stupid! icon_eek.gif

JanH Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 3:18am
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarandslice

I give clients a somewhat detailed invoice including number of hrs @ $x/hr...

This way they know how many hours I'm putting into their cake and they can understand how much work is involved.




JMHO, but I think it's only a matter of time before you get a customer who feels that you should be able to "do" more in "less" time...

What will you do if/when a customer asks for a cake that can be decorated in an hour (to keep down the labor costs)?

jules06 Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 10:52am
post #13 of 17

Thanks guys for all the great advice icon_biggrin.gif
I appreciate you all taking the time to respond.

Tee-Y Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 11:24am
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanH

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarandslice

I give clients a somewhat detailed invoice including number of hrs @ $x/hr...

This way they know how many hours I'm putting into their cake and they can understand how much work is involved.



JMHO, but I think it's only a matter of time before you get a customer who feels that you should be able to "do" more in "less" time...

What will you do if/when a customer asks for a cake that can be decorated in an hour (to keep down the labor costs)?




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif Oh JanH, that has already started happening, going by what we see in the forums these days!!!!People want one day express cakes-weddings cakes at that icon_eek.gificon_lol.gif !!!!!!

laboti Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 9:24pm
post #15 of 17

i agree with keeping it simple! because some people think you are just adding things that they don't know what they are just to get more money!! i had people talking to me about other places that gives them this huge piece of paper for a cake and they do not understand half of it like the charge for the equipment(cake stands,fountains,etc...) they are like isn't this allready included? so just 1 price x # of items = returning customers! icon_wink.gif

indydebi Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 9:34pm
post #16 of 17

laboti, I love your post! This is why I have flat-price pricing. All a client wants to know is "How many people will it serve and how much is it going to cost me?" Period.

I recall a couple of years ago (I hadn't been on CC very long) and a CC'er posted her price list and asked for feedback. By the time I got thru her FIFTH PAGE, I was "oh good god just tell me how much the freakin' cake is!" And as a caker, I understood all the extras she was charging for! icon_eek.gif But I was still exasperated with the novel masquerading (sp?) as a price list.

Keep. It. Simple.

sugarandslice Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 9:56pm
post #17 of 17

Perhaps it's a cultural difference that my customers like the information; I'm in Australia.

NB: I am in NO way saying that one is better than another - let's not go there!! - it's just a thought I'm having!

And I don't ever list every bit of equipment (just an item called 'sundry materials' covers all my cakeboards, dowels etc)

Perhaps I'll find as I do more paying orders that a detailed invoice/quote isn't necessary, you never know!
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