Do Ya'll Torte Your Cake Layers

Decorating By Mark-Mexicano Updated 9 Nov 2009 , 10:14pm by Cakepro

Mark-Mexicano Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 8:29pm
post #1 of 17

I was just wondering cause I dont, I just use 2-2" cake layers for one tier. I think that 4-1" layers would be a bit much but they look sooooooo much nicer. So it would be great to hear what ya'll do. Also would you just use torted cakes for wedding or "teird" cakes OR for like a 8" b-day cake too

16 replies
cylstrial Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 8:33pm
post #2 of 17

Sometimes I tort all the cakes 1" and do the 4 layers like you mentioned. It does look really nice.

Sometimes I just do three layers. But I almost always tort at 1"

KHalstead Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 8:38pm
post #3 of 17

I used to torte all of my cakes (double layer cakes) into 4 layers of cake, 3 layers of filling/bc. BUT it takes me soooooooooooooooooo long doing that............so now I just use 2-2" layers of cake unless they want to pay $.25/serv. extra to have it torted with bc or $.50/serv. to have it torted with filling. Since I started charging nobody has opted to have their cake torted, not even the last 3 wedding cakes I've done since starting to charge for it. I mean, time is money and torting takes me a lot of time!

Deb_ Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 8:43pm
post #4 of 17

Yes I torte every cake no matter the occasion....it's what sets my custom cakes apart from the bakery in town that doesn't torte, and it makes a beautiful presentation.

I thought I'd add what I do a little differently then others. My tiers are 4 layers of cake and 3 layers of filling however the middle layer of filling is actually my icing whether it be BC or any other icing I'm using.

I'll tell you why I started doing this. When I was cutting a large tier one day at a function I noticed a lot of people reaching for the "end" pieces because they felt that the "middle" pieces didn't have enough icing. Everybody seems to want a lot of icing.

So by putting an extra layer of icing in the middle of each tier every piece gets 2 layers of icing and 2 layers of filling.

I also have found that there is a lot less slipping or sliding because the middle layer of BC stabilizes the tier.

sugalips Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 8:48pm
post #5 of 17

So, when you torte all the layers are you using a 2" or 3" pan? icon_confused.gif

sillywabbitz Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:01pm
post #6 of 17

I have done it both ways. I bake 2 , 2 inch deep cakes and torte. I noticed that I got the bulge and the not so pretty straight sides when I torte. When I don't torte I get SugarShack quality sides. I have to say I emailed her personally to see if she torted because she doesn't in her videos and for me it makes such a prettier more stable cake I'm not sure I'll go back to torting. I have to for my sister..she's a filling nuticon_smile.gif but for everyone else I don't think so. I will dkelly's approach of torting but using buttercream as the middle to see if that helps my stability.

cakebaker1957 Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:01pm
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

I used to torte all of my cakes (double layer cakes) into 4 layers of cake, 3 layers of filling/bc. BUT it takes me soooooooooooooooooo long doing that............so now I just use 2-2" layers of cake unless they want to pay $.25/serv. extra to have it torted with bc or $.50/serv. to have it torted with filling. Since I started charging nobody has opted to have their cake torted, not even the last 3 wedding cakes I've done since starting to charge for it. I mean, time is money and torting takes me a lot of time!




KHalstead, have you torted a 14 in x2 round cakes? How hard is it to handle and to get back onto the other cake with out getting it out of line?? Sorry i have a wedding cake to do in June i usually torte my smaller cakes but i have never tried a 14 in before, Just wondering how hard it is to handle?

leah_s Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:19pm
post #8 of 17

I torte ALL cakes. It sets me apart frmo the bakeries in town. It's incrediably easy with my Agbay. One swipe and the layer is leveled and torted. Not difficult to handle at all, either. Just slide a cardboard under the layer and put it wherever.

momma28 Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:19pm
post #9 of 17

I love the way the cake looks when sliced and tastes when torted and I have recently started torting all my cakes. I have however noticed the same issue mentioned previously, the sides sometimes are not perfectly striaght up and down. I dont know if it is an issue of filling type or I am just not getting them back together the same as before they were cut. I have been considering buying cake rings and filling and stacking inside them like Cake Alchemy does so that I still have the perfectly shaped cake. Stack fill and chill them slide the ring off and viola...perfect sides. My hubby says its not worth it but I think it looks soooo nice torted and most times people really want the extra filling.

Cakepro Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:38pm
post #10 of 17

2" tall layers of cake is not pretty IMO, so all of my cakes have either three or four 1" layers of cake separated by fillings.

Deb_ Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:40pm
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakebaker1957

Quote:
Originally Posted by KHalstead

I used to torte all of my cakes (double layer cakes) into 4 layers of cake, 3 layers of filling/bc. BUT it takes me soooooooooooooooooo long doing that............so now I just use 2-2" layers of cake unless they want to pay $.25/serv. extra to have it torted with bc or $.50/serv. to have it torted with filling. Since I started charging nobody has opted to have their cake torted, not even the last 3 wedding cakes I've done since starting to charge for it. I mean, time is money and torting takes me a lot of time!



KHalstead, have you torted a 14 in x2 round cakes? How hard is it to handle and to get back onto the other cake with out getting it out of line?? Sorry i have a wedding cake to do in June i usually torte my smaller cakes but i have never tried a 14 in before, Just wondering how hard it is to handle?




When you need to torte very large layers what I do is slide either a "sideless" cookie sheet in between the layers and lift off (I dust the cookie sheet with PS first) or I use the 2 large Wilton cake lifters....1 on each side of the layer....slide them in to the middle and lift off. Then just slide the torted layer back on right off of the cookie sheet or cake lifters.

For those having trouble with the sides not being even.....it could be your pans, the Wilton pans are not straight up and down on the sides.

Magic Line pans are and if you try them you won't be disappointed. However, if you don't want to invest in new pans, you could always trim your sides before crumb coating.

Edit to add I bake 2" layers.

grandmom Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:51pm
post #12 of 17

I experience less stability when I torte, so lately I stopped, and torting does seem to be the problem. I found the problem persisted after getting Magic Line pans, but no regrets there! Yes, it's easy to torte with my Agbay, and easy to move the torted layers with a cardboard or a cake lifter.

But upon stacking, filling and icing, I get some slippage. I'm wondering if maybe I am filling too thickly?? I always use a stiff dam, no matter what filling I choose.

LaBellaFlor Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:53pm
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I torte ALL cakes. It sets me apart frmo the bakeries in town. It's incrediably easy with my Agbay. One swipe and the layer is leveled and torted. Not difficult to handle at all, either. Just slide a cardboard under the layer and put it wherever.




Exactly how I do it using the carboard to move around bigger layers.

Deb_ Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:54pm
post #14 of 17

Grandmom, if you don't want to torte and add that extra layer of BC like I mentioned above you can try piping another "ring" of BC towards the center of your layer and fill that circle in with filling and then fill between the outer dam and the inner circle. It will help with slipping.

Does that make sense or did I just completely confuse everyone? icon_confused.gif

Cakepro Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 9:55pm
post #15 of 17

A few straws or dowels also help with any slipping problems. icon_smile.gif

grandmom Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 10:08pm
post #16 of 17

That made perfect sense, dkelly! Thanks, I will try it.

And cakepro, I have used dowels in a simple 8" to hold it when it starting sliding, but felt like somewhat of a failure for not being able to keep such a small cake together! Glad to know it's happened to others, not just me!

Cakepro Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 10:14pm
post #17 of 17

Failure! No way!

My dad LOVES DH canned strawberry frosting slathered on a boxed DH strawberry cake, and I like making tall cakes....not a good combination with that soft frosting. All of his BD cakes are 8" rounds and if I didn't stick straws in them, those top two layers would slide right off. icon_biggrin.gif

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