Melted Chocolate Transfer Vs. Fbct - Your Thoughts?

Decorating By niccicola Updated 9 Nov 2009 , 7:40pm by MichelleM77

niccicola Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 6:08pm
post #1 of 10

I've taken a liking to using melted chocolate as opposed to frozen buttercream to make an image transfer.

I love how the choco. i's not as temperamental. I don't have to worry about my imaget sticking to the wax paper if I'm not quick enough out of the freezer.The choco can be fragile and break easy, but I've broken more images with frozen BC than with the melted chocolate.

Then, I picked up a copy of The Whimsical Bakehouse and everything she/they do is with melted chocolate. Totally justified my decision to forgo the FBCT in lieu of melted choc.

Which do you like best?

9 replies
playingwithsugar Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 6:25pm
post #2 of 10

I've never made an FBCT, but I have done chocolate transfers in the past. Not being able to properly compare, I would say I still prefer the chocolate transfers, because you can use them from either side without risk of air bubbles and open spaces on the back.

Edited to say - There is also the time and temperature factors. Chocolate transfers can be made days ahead, and stored in a box until needed. There is no special temperature, and as long as you don't hold them for a long period of time, they can be handled and manipulated to the place/angle you desire.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

PattyT Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 6:33pm
post #3 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

I've never made an FBCT, but I have done chocolate transfers in the past. Not being able to properly compare, I would say I still prefer the chocolate transfers, because you can use them from either side without risk of air bubbles and open spaces on the back.

Edited to say - There is also the time and temperature factors. Chocolate transfers can be made days ahead, and stored in a box until needed. There is no special temperature, and as long as you don't hold them for a long period of time, they can be handled and manipulated to the place/angle you desire.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




Ditto, ditto, ditto! Chocolate transfers get my vote.

I love them because they CAN be made ahead. You can also stand them up on cakes, in cupcakes and I use them on cookies too.

I also was inspired by the Whimsical Bakehouse transfers - I have the book and they show them on their wonderful "How To" section.

cutthecake Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 6:46pm
post #4 of 10

I've never made FBCT, but I love chocolate transfers. I think they're very quick and easy to make, and you can glue them to lollipop sticks to stand them up. I just google "........ coloring pages" for images.
And I love my Whimsical Bakehouse book, too. The Riviera Bakehouse (home of the Whimsical Bakehouse books' authors) is not too far from me--I'm planning a trip there soon.

MichelleM77 Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 7:05pm
post #5 of 10

I love the WBH book!

However, I'm running into problems getting the chocolate to melt at the right temperature. Maybe you guys can help. I have a low wattage microwave that will not melt chocolate (I have to put a cup of tea in for 3-4 minutes to get it hot! LOL!) and a double boiler isn't working for colored chocolate, though I can melt the "regular" chocolate disks just fine; colored seems to be the problem. WHen I do get the chocolate melted, it is too hot to put in the bags and handle. I'm afraid to leave it to cool too much and not have it pipe correctly.

Any suggestions? I was thinking of getting an electric griddle (need one anyway for pancakes. icon_smile.gif ) and using small glass bowls for melting the chocolate.

I love the chocolate transfers and want to tackle these issues. Thanks so much!

cutthecake Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 7:15pm
post #6 of 10

If the chocolate doesn't melt properly, I add Crisco ( a teaspoon at a time) to smooth it out. It helps a lot.

Another tip: Be careful not to scald or overheat the chocolate.

playingwithsugar Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 7:15pm
post #7 of 10

The problem you're having is that the melting point of white/colored chocolate or compounds is about 10-15 degrees lower than it is for milk/dark chocolate, and knowing the temperature sensitivity of white/colored chocolate or compounds, I'm surprised it didn't sieze up on you.

I've used a griddle in the past, to melt multiple colors of compound. It's a headache, as you have to get the temperature just right, and you have to walk away from it for at least half an hour to melt a pound.

I bought some 4-cup Pyrex measuring cups. I melt a pound of compound at a time. I run it at full power for 1 minute (my microwave is 1200 watts), then stir. Additional 15-30 second intervals are needed to melt more thoroughly. I only melt them about 3/4 of the way, because the carry-over heat from the glass measuring cup will hold the temperature long enough to melt it the rest of the way.

Theresa

MichelleM77 Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 7:26pm
post #8 of 10

playingwithsugar....I guess I should have said I'm using candy coating and not real chocolate. Does that change your suggestions any?

One minute and then 15-30 seconds would do absolutely nothing. It actually seizes up in the microwave and not in the double boiler. I don't mind it taking 30 minutes to melt in the double boiler if that's what I need to do, just didn't realize it would take that long. Maybe I need to be more patient. icon_smile.gif

I googled around for my microwave wattage and I think it's only 600 watts (it was purchased in 95 when I went to college; works fine for tea and warming up veggies, don't want to get a new one and it's the cutest little thing).

playingwithsugar Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 7:33pm
post #9 of 10

No, MichelleM77, my suggestions do not change, because I assumed by your description that you were discussing compounds (coating or melts). Colored real chocolate is only infrequently available, and extremely expensive if you can find it.

What are you using to melt your product in? If using plastic, the compound can easily overheat. I've used nothing but glass for about 5 years now, except when I'm making chocolate modeling clay. Then I use a metal bowl over hot water.

Have you ever heard of paramount crystals? They are made of the same fat that is in the compound wafers. It has no chocolate liqueur, sugar, powdered milk, or other ingredients in it, and is used to thin and smooth compound out, without changing the texture. Perhaps you should get some of them and add them, about a tablespoon at a time, until you get the consistency you desire.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

MichelleM77 Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 7:40pm
post #10 of 10

Glass bowls in microwave and either glass or metal for double boiler.

I have tried paramount crystals in the past. I will try them again.

Thanks for your help...and sorry for hijacking the post.

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