Can We Start A Thread On How We Transport Our Cakes?

Decorating By charleezgal Updated 15 Nov 2009 , 3:20am by tracycakes

charleezgal Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 2:26pm
post #1 of 35

I usually have one or more of my kids help by holding a cake while we travel to the venue. They slide if I put them in boxes and it's so stressful getting them there. How do you all get your cakes out the door safely?

34 replies
leah_s Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 3:45pm
post #2 of 35

First I use SPS as my support system, so I know the cakes' are not moving.
Then I put non-skid mat in the back of the SUV. Set the cakes on the non-skid and off we go. I was taught NOT to box for delivery. I can travel with stacked cakes, no problem. Easy.

jenmat Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 4:06pm
post #3 of 35

non skid is key, even with a small cake or one tiered. I tried having a cake on my lap once.... yeah, never again. I used Stress Free Supports in tiered cakes over 2 tiers, and I also don't assemble until I get there for weddings.
Both are just personal preferences- SPS works great too, and I know plenty of people who deliver fully assembled with nary a worry.
I also never box wedding cakes, just another step that can connect fingers to cake icing.

indydebi Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 4:58pm
post #4 of 35

non-skid material is a MUST. I use my 18x26 baking sheets with non-skid material to transport an unassembled cake, like in this pic: http:[email protected]/3557930383/

If I put the cakes in a box, a small square of non-skid goes in the box, under the cake. then non-skid goes under the box when I put it in the van.

Even my assembled cakes are placed on my 18x26 pans with non-skid under them.

Cakes should be transported on a flat surface (not someone's lap).

grandmom Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 5:13pm
post #5 of 35

I'm not a pro, just an avid hobbyist. Most of my cakes are delivered to family members about 2 hours away by car.

I place a large sheet of upholstery foam in the back of our small SUV (rides rough!). In the kitchen, I place another sheet of upholstery foam on a large square of thick plywood, then place the cake on the foam. I place a large cardboard box upside down over the cake.

Most of my cakes are two tiers, and are transported fully assembled.

So far not one slip, slide, ding or dropped decoration. And I mean our SUV rides rough - 99 RAV4.

playingwithsugar Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 5:13pm
post #6 of 35

This is a good place to repeat myself.

I normally transport cakes in separate boxes, as the city and area I live in is extremely hilly, with winding turns.

I learned my lesson in May, when I tried transporting a 3-tier cake without a center dowel. The tier supports held, but when I went around a turn, and with it being so warm out, I ended up with a cake that was leaning, and not just a bit. There was no place on the way to stop and purchase a long dowel, otherwise I would have corrected it before I got there.

I so much want to buy the SPS, but the infrequency of use does not justify the expense at the present time. Perhaps all my nieces and nephews will get married soon. Then I'll have need for it.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

leah_s Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 6:09pm
post #7 of 35

You do realize that for a four tier cake, SPS will cost you under $17?

playingwithsugar Posted 9 Nov 2009 , 6:12pm
post #8 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

You do realize that for a four tier cake, SPS will cost you under $17?




I did not know that. I know you've posted your source many times, but send it my way again, and I will research it further.

Thanks!

Theresa icon_smile.gif

sugarcheryl Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:26am
post #9 of 35

I use a non skid material and I use a dowel in the center and just take it slow and I usually do not have any problems. The tallest I've delivered was a three tier any more tiers I assemble on site.

peg818 Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:42am
post #10 of 35

i deliver a cold cake, using a non skid mat, and riding flat in the back of the car. I deliver all my cakes stacked, never thought to do it anyother way until i started visiting the internet, haven't lost one yet and i travel some very ruff roads. The only road i worry about the most is if i have to stop at the end of my road the cake would then be sitting on an angle. The other thing i worry about is if i have to take a cake through the round about, because although its been in a couple of years still no one seems to know how to drive through it and they don't like to yield the right of way.

ljdills Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:44am
post #11 of 35

leah_s
I am not sure I really understand how the SPS works. Is there just that little notch holding the cake in place ? No center dowel ? I've looked at it, but guess I can't wrap my brain around how it works. Can you pm me with information?

leah_s Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 3:04am
post #12 of 35

I can't PM you any more than what's in the sticky at the top of the How Do I? Forum. There just isn't any more info. Maybe if you print it out that would help. You do not need a center dowel with SPS - it's quite secure.

Sources for SPS are:
Global Sugar Art
Oasis Supply
If you can buy wholesale, Bakery Craft (the manufacturer)

loriemoms Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 3:26am
post #13 of 35

I use SPS, and use royal icing to glue the cake board to the plastic plate..only had one cake topper slide on me and that was a very hard sudden stop. No damage to the cake, just slid a little.

I box all my cakes in a special box we made that the sides drop down and the cake slides inside a holder with a non slip mat in it. I like this as it keeps the sun out of the box and also keeps people from wanting to "help" when we get to the venue. It also keeps the cold in the box (i transport all my cakes cold) I dont understand the "finger" thing...you can poke a cake without being a box as much as in the box! haha!

Our van is lined with the egg crate stuff you put on your mattress then non slip mats. And we have A/C in the back, so it stays cool back there.

My DH wants one of those new Ford commerical vans in the worse way. I saw Duff went and got himself one!

Mommyofseven Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 1:52pm
post #14 of 35

Lots of talk about the SPS could someone please explain what the sps system is. Thanks

Loucinda Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:53pm
post #15 of 35
Quote:
Quote:

My DH wants one of those new Ford commerical vans in the worse way. I saw Duff went and got himself one!




We just looked at those too! They are made in Turkey. We may still get one - just not until they have been around here a while first. They are called a "Transport".

leah_s Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 2:54pm
post #16 of 35

[quote="Mommyofseven"]Lots of talk about the SPS could someone please explain what the sps system is. Thanks[/quote]

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Mommyofseven Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 6:42pm
post #17 of 35

Thank you leah_s that helped. I found this link on that thread. http://media.cakecentral.com/files/sps_104.pdf

leah_s Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 7:22pm
post #18 of 35

Yep, those are my instructions.

suzie1962 Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 7:43pm
post #19 of 35

I've read those instructions a million times and I still don't get how the little notch holds the cake in place!! icon_eek.gif

ThreeDGirlie Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 7:44pm
post #20 of 35

Hmmm.... No box? Don't you worry about dust, hair, lint etc getting onto the cake?

indydebi Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 7:54pm
post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzie1962

I've read those instructions a million times and I still don't get how the little notch holds the cake in place!! icon_eek.gif




I'm not sure you have to "get it" .... you just have to know it works. leahs SPS system has gotten super positive reviews by all on here who use it. Don't stress on understanding WHY ..... just be relieved that is DOES. thumbs_up.gif

cakelady31 Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 8:13pm
post #22 of 35

I absolutely LOVE the sps system, that is all I use. And I don't find it to be expensive at all. I consider it piece of mind. I also use non slip matting under the cake circle in the box as well as under the box. I found my yoga matt works perfectly as a grippy mat in my car. (you can figure out I don't use it for it's original purchase icon_rolleyes.gif ) I bought a magnum to use as my delivery vehicle and it all works great.! My windows are tinted and in the warmer weather I Pre-cool the car before I put the cake in for transport. i have delivered both stacked tiered cakes and cakes which I stack and assemble on site. I love being able to drop and run though.

neecakes Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 8:15pm
post #23 of 35

Does anyone have a source for the non-slip mats? Are they a certain brand? Thank you!

cakelady31 Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 8:17pm
post #24 of 35

May I just say Indydebi, I love your picture! very fitting for your personalitity!!! awsome. thumbs_up.gif I need to find a good avatar.

Sorry,, carry on........

cakelady31 Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 8:22pm
post #25 of 35

You can usually find it anywhere they sell kitchen wares, It comes in a roll ,all different colors, I think it's used for lining kitchen draws. Not sure of the actual name of the stuff. it cuts easy and washes pretty easy too.

metria Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 8:56pm
post #26 of 35

looks like:

http://www.organizeit.com/pogripit.asp

My Walmart carries a pretty good selection of this stuff.

neecakes Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 9:43pm
post #27 of 35

Ahh! Thank you very much for your responses!

loriemoms Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 9:44pm
post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loucinda

Quote:
Quote:

My DH wants one of those new Ford commerical vans in the worse way. I saw Duff went and got himself one!



We just looked at those too! They are made in Turkey. We may still get one - just not until they have been around here a while first. They are called a "Transport".




I want to wait until version 2 as well. the shelves look cool in them!!

leah_s Posted 10 Nov 2009 , 9:50pm
post #29 of 35

About the peg:

The icing that you put on the SPS plate holds the cardboard onto the plate.
The peg goes into the hole you punched in your cardboard so that the cardboard can't go sideways.
The icing that you put on the cardboard holds the cake to the board.
And so on.

The legs lock onto the plate.

Everything's tied together, just like the bricks and morter and joists and floors in your house.

And unlike dowels and cardboards. The cake may be iced onto the cardboard, but that cardboard is just sittin' there on top of those 1/4" dowels. Which you have to *hope* you cut exactly even.

chelleb1974 Posted 11 Nov 2009 , 6:02am
post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by neecakes

Does anyone have a source for the non-slip mats? Are they a certain brand? Thank you!




I get mine from the dollar store or Walmart icon_smile.gif

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