Another Great Article About To Save Money On Cakes

Business By cylstrial Updated 14 Nov 2009 , 3:16am by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

cylstrial Posted 7 Nov 2009 , 8:32pm
post #1 of 48

Here's another one of our favorite topics.

http://articles.directorym.com/Wedding_Cake_on_Budget_Evansville_IN-r1144433-Evansville_IN.html

My favorite part is where they talk about fondant being a hard substance and where your grocery store will be able to offer you some sort of butter cream thing. icon_lol.gif

And let's not forget, that the bride and groom should probably specify what kind of cake and frosting they want. Really?? icon_eek.gif They get a choice? icon_eek.gif I thought it was just whatever was on hand. LOL. icon_lol.gif

47 replies
TTran Posted 7 Nov 2009 , 8:49pm
post #2 of 48

My favorite part is how you can "assign" your family/friends WHO MADE the CAKE to CUT it at the reception!

littlecake Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:00am
post #3 of 48

you can get 9 pieces from a 9 inch round! ha ha

auntginn Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:11am
post #4 of 48

Oh Wow! Wedding Donuts, whodda thought. icon_confused.gif I guess they will be the new next big thing, decorated donuts. icon_eek.gif rofl. Donut shops will tell you There's not much profit margin in a donut, so if they can get $3.00 for a donut they'll think they died and went to sugar heaven icon_lol.gif

momma28 Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:23am
post #5 of 48

I think the author of this article is a fan of a show that my hubby and I stumbled upon one night a couple of years ago and could not believe our eyes, maybe you remember it, "My Big Redneck Wedding" or some such nonsense....archways made of beer cans...wedding dresses 4 sizes too small ...Bride missplacing her "teeth" on her wedding day ...stacked twinkies for the wedding "cake".

Hooooo Doooogggiee!! NOW THAT THER IS A GOOOOOOD TIME!!!

littlecake Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:24am
post #6 of 48

donuts really do seem tacky for a wedding...coffee and donut reception?

i could never see how donut shops stay open, the profit margin is so low, maybe they make more $$$ off the coffee.

funcakes Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:25am
post #7 of 48

Thanks for the laugh! I giggled through the whole article.
The fact that there was a grammatical mistake in the first few sentences should warn off readers this might not be the most educated advice.
Loved the idea to speak with the grocery store bakers, because they know about cakes and serving (unlike those professional cake artists)LOL.
They may frost a lot of cakes, but how often do they cut and serve them???
Also loved the idea that the wedding cake from the grocery store could have writing on it just like a birthday cake. All I could think of was...
"Happy Married Life" like the scammers order.
Okay fun time over now back to working with that hard stuff called fondant for my next cake.

Bunsen Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:39am
post #8 of 48

"As another option some brides have decided to ask family members to bring an assortment of treasured family dessert items like cookies, cookie bars, and pies to serve to the guests for the reception. This way, no one person has to bear the brunt of the expense."

Just working out how you put that on the invite - BYO twinkies, as we are too cheap to spring for cake sounds so coarse...

LaBellaFlor Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:40am
post #9 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by momma28

I think the author of this article is a fan of a show that my hubby and I stumbled upon one night a couple of years ago and could not believe our eyes, maybe you remember it, "My Big Redneck Wedding" or some such nonsense....archways made of beer cans...wedding dresses 4 sizes too small ...Bride missplacing her "teeth" on her wedding day ...stacked twinkies for the wedding "cake".

Hooooo Doooogggiee!! NOW THAT THER IS A GOOOOOOD TIME!!!





ROFLMAO! You are hilarious!!!

CakeMommyTX Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:45am
post #10 of 48

I love the advice to "take advantage of bakers in your family" and to "assign those who make the cakes to cut them", sounds like an awesome wedding celebration already!
First you get taken advantage of by a cheap bride and then you can't even enjoy the free food and open bar because you've been assigned a duty.

16 pieces from an average 9" ?Wiltons chart gives you 32? I wonder if they learned that from the all knowing grocery store bakers?
What exactly is an average 9"?
If you added up all the 9" cakes and divided them by the total to get your average, then would'nt it still be a 9"?

And good for us custom bakers thast a grocery store will write on the cake in some sort of butter cream, if it was'nt for them cakes would be wordless!
And of course thanks to CakeWrecks we all know how well grocery store bakeries are with the written word!
Ok gonna go finish this enlightening article now, I'll be back when my brain starts hurting....

costumeczar Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:54am
post #11 of 48

Oh wow, this is possibly the worst one yet!

raquel1 Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:55am
post #12 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

Quote:
Originally Posted by momma28

I think the author of this article is a fan of a show that my hubby and I stumbled upon one night a couple of years ago and could not believe our eyes, maybe you remember it, "My Big Redneck Wedding" or some such nonsense....archways made of beer cans...wedding dresses 4 sizes too small ...Bride missplacing her "teeth" on her wedding day ...stacked twinkies for the wedding "cake".

Hooooo Doooogggiee!! NOW THAT THER IS A GOOOOOOD TIME!!!




ROFLMAO! You are hilarious!!!




DITTO!!!!

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:16am
post #13 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunsen

"As another option some brides have decided to ask family members to bring an assortment of treasured family dessert items like cookies, cookie bars, and pies to serve to the guests for the reception. This way, no one person has to bear the brunt of the expense."

Just working out how you put that on the invite - BYO twinkies, as we are too cheap to spring for cake sounds so coarse...




Way back when, when most of my bros and sis's had their reception in the church hall, the "Church Ladies" (Guild members, not the one from SNL!) would prepare and serve the dinner. The wedding cake was a given, and there were pies, etc. for the main dessert (also made by the ladies), but then everyone in the immediate family would bring a dessert (squares, etc.) for the 'after midnight' table. By then, the Guild members had gone home and would not be there to put out a second buffet. (And the family would also help set this up, do the dishes and clean up the hall, too.)

Maybe it's the 'small town' mentality (or I'm showing my age), but I don't see anything wrong with this if you're doing it on the cheap and you've got willing participants. Expecting it to be done is not good, but having the offer extended is fine.

playingwithsugar Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:16am
post #14 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

I love the advice to "take advantage of bakers in your family" and to "assign those who make the cakes to cut them"




I can't say anything about this, because it's what I did last weekend. My step-grandson got married, and I did their cake as our gift. The couple was happy with the design, and had they bought it, they would have paid at least $750 for it locally. And I had so much fun doing it for them.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

momma28 Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:21am
post #15 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

I love the advice to "take advantage of bakers in your family" and to "assign those who make the cakes to cut them"



I can't say anything about this, because it's what I did last weekend. My step-grandson got married, and I did their cake as our gift. The couple was happy with the design, and had they bought it, they would have paid at least $750 for it locally. And I had so much fun doing it for them.

Theresa icon_smile.gif




I have done a wedding cake as a gift to a friend before and I dont think there is anything wrong with it if you offer out of love for that person, this article however seems to imply that you should guilt anyone you know who can bake into making your cake or cakes and then serving them. Doing it out of love is different than what this article seems to say.

HarleyDee Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:22am
post #16 of 48

That just made my night, thank you icon_biggrin.gif

"Happy gettin' merried day" will be the slogan to watch for on all 2010 wedding cakes icon_biggrin.gif

playingwithsugar Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:32am
post #17 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by momma28

I have done a wedding cake as a gift to a friend before and I dont think there is anything wrong with it if you offer out of love for that person, this article however seems to imply that you should guilt anyone you know who can bake into making your cake or cakes and then serving them. Doing it out of love is different than what this article seems to say.




I agree with you about what the article implies. It's just as bad as the bride who goes around asking businesses to sponsor their wedding amenities.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:36am
post #18 of 48

Did you see the extra wedding related links at the bottom? Love the one about "Make Your Own Wedding Cake". The instructions are hilarious!

Bake 3 cakes - gives diametre but not final height required.

Torte - most Cake Muggles don't know what this is. PLUS it doesn't say to level them first.

Cover it BC - Again, most Cake Muggles don't really know the proper name for icing.

Insert Supports in the middle - I can just see some bride putting all 4 legs into the very centre of the cake. And it also doesn't say you will need to cut the supports (because I doubt a cheap bride would be using SPS).

Stack - Relating to above, because the supports are all now in the very centre, the cake plate will sit precariously on them.

You can finish icing and decorating while it's stacked - HUH? How in the heck do you finish BCing an already stacked cake? Only the parts showing would have BC on them ... and the edges of all the plates, too, no doubt.

Decorations - Place a matching ribbon around the bottom of each layer (so that the colour will melt into the BC). Don't forget to get some of those lovely poisonous flowers from the florist. And, for heavens sake, don't use a flower holder at all. Just stick the stem directly into the cake.

Best of all, it doesn't tell the bride how to actually transport this now iced and stacked cake to the venue.

Who wrote this crap? icon_confused.gificon_rolleyes.gif

__Martha__ Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:46am
post #19 of 48

You guys are cracking me up! icon_biggrin.gif

These people are out there, folks ... DH used to do wiretaps (legal ones, of course) and he heard all about a wedding reception that was catered by KFC. It would only be fitting to have a nice slab cake from the corner grocery store at that shindig (with buttercream and writing on it, of course).

Bunsen Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:52am
post #20 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunsen

"As another option some brides have decided to ask family members to bring an assortment of treasured family dessert items like cookies, cookie bars, and pies to serve to the guests for the reception. This way, no one person has to bear the brunt of the expense."

Just working out how you put that on the invite - BYO twinkies, as we are too cheap to spring for cake sounds so coarse...



Way back when, when most of my bros and sis's had their reception in the church hall, the "Church Ladies" (Guild members, not the one from SNL!) would prepare and serve the dinner. The wedding cake was a given, and there were pies, etc. for the main dessert (also made by the ladies), but then everyone in the immediate family would bring a dessert (squares, etc.) for the 'after midnight' table. By then, the Guild members had gone home and would not be there to put out a second buffet. (And the family would also help set this up, do the dishes and clean up the hall, too.)

Maybe it's the 'small town' mentality (or I'm showing my age), but I don't see anything wrong with this if you're doing it on the cheap and you've got willing participants. Expecting it to be done is not good, but having the offer extended is fine.




Absolutely, the problem I have with it is the expectation that you can demand your guests to do work and contribute their money just to save you money - what you describe is a lovely tradition that celebrates the true reason for sharing your entry into marriage with your family and community, something that is often forgotten as couples try for the big glamorous "look at me" wedding without the budget to pay for it.

CakeMommyTX Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:57am
post #21 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by momma28

Quote:
Originally Posted by playingwithsugar

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

I love the advice to "take advantage of bakers in your family" and to "assign those who make the cakes to cut them"



I can't say anything about this, because it's what I did last weekend. My step-grandson got married, and I did their cake as our gift. The couple was happy with the design, and had they bought it, they would have paid at least $750 for it locally. And I had so much fun doing it for them.

Theresa icon_smile.gif



I have done a wedding cake as a gift to a friend before and I dont think there is anything wrong with it if you offer out of love for that person, this article however seems to imply that you should guilt anyone you know who can bake into making your cake or cakes and then serving them. Doing it out of love is different than what this article seems to say.




That's what I was getting at, they make it seems like you should make someone do your cake.

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 3:06am
post #22 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunsen

Quote:
Originally Posted by CutiePieCakes-Ontario

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunsen

"As another option some brides have decided to ask family members to bring an assortment of treasured family dessert items like cookies, cookie bars, and pies to serve to the guests for the reception. This way, no one person has to bear the brunt of the expense."

Just working out how you put that on the invite - BYO twinkies, as we are too cheap to spring for cake sounds so coarse...



Way back when, when most of my bros and sis's had their reception in the church hall, the "Church Ladies" (Guild members, not the one from SNL!) would prepare and serve the dinner. The wedding cake was a given, and there were pies, etc. for the main dessert (also made by the ladies), but then everyone in the immediate family would bring a dessert (squares, etc.) for the 'after midnight' table. By then, the Guild members had gone home and would not be there to put out a second buffet. (And the family would also help set this up, do the dishes and clean up the hall, too.)

Maybe it's the 'small town' mentality (or I'm showing my age), but I don't see anything wrong with this if you're doing it on the cheap and you've got willing participants. Expecting it to be done is not good, but having the offer extended is fine.



Absolutely, the problem I have with it is the expectation that you can demand your guests to do work and contribute their money just to save you money - what you describe is a lovely tradition that celebrates the true reason for sharing your entry into marriage with your family and community, something that is often forgotten as couples try for the big glamorous "look at me" wedding without the budget to pay for it.





No offence meant or taken. Just pointing out how we did it eons ago ... in a galaxy far, far away. icon_wink.gif

7yyrt Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 4:44am
post #23 of 48

We do it very similarly here, CutiePieCakes.
The reception is a combining of two families, each welcoming the other.

indydebi Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 5:13am
post #24 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Martha__

You guys are cracking me up! icon_biggrin.gif

These people are out there, folks ... DH used to do wiretaps (legal ones, of course) and he heard all about a wedding reception that was catered by KFC. It would only be fitting to have a nice slab cake from the corner grocery store at that shindig (with buttercream and writing on it, of course).




I did the wedding cake for a wedding that was catered by Pizza Hut! Yes, Hut arrived with about 30 boxes of pizza, plus salads, breadsticks, plates, napkins, forks, packets of salad dressings.

This was also the wedding where the groom shoved the cake so hard that the bride went crying to the ladies room, followed by her bridesmaids (it reminded of the cartoon version of Cinderella when the stepsisters flounce out of a room, following their stepmother!). Bride was digging cake out of her dress (boobs) with one hand and wiping her eyes with the other.

I heard 2 guests laugh with "Well, THAT honeymoon was over before it started!" icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

cylstrial Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:09pm
post #25 of 48

It's one thing for a cake maker to offer to make a cake as your gift to the couple, it's another thing for the family to insist that you make it.

Funny story Debi! The poor bride digging cake out of her boobs. Egads.

jlynnw Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 1:22pm
post #26 of 48

I would think if the baker offered, that is out of love. Giving the cake to the bride and groom is a gift from the heart, whether they could have afforded it in the first place or not, is a special gift. But asking a family baker to do the work making the cake for free, expecting them then to make it to go to the reception and cut it for free - that is a bit much. This group of bride and groom's who have no idea of the hurt they cause is so sad.

margaretb Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 2:34pm
post #27 of 48

I thought one person WAS supposed to bear the brunt of the expense ... THE HOST.

I also don't see how digging a donut out of a sticky donut pile is EASIER than picking up a slice of cake on a plate.

And of course I enjoyed the clever phrasing here: "The first thing you need to do is to determine just exactly how many people you expect to give cake to at your wedding reception." because obviously that is NOT the same thing as "determine the number of GUESTS".

ButtercupMama Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 8:36pm
post #28 of 48

That article was so idiotic on so many levels, I don't even have the energy to be specific.
I thought the press was supposed to be encouraging folks to spend money in their local communities, to boost this economy?
As a bakery, I don't think I'd be putting any advertising dollars into this publication anytime soon.
What a waste of paper and ink.

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 10:15pm
post #29 of 48

Re-reading this thread, it just dawned on me. A long time ago I saw a wedding "cake" made entirely from Crispy Creme donuts! I didn't know what CCreme was back then (we've only had them in Canada a few years - and most of the outlets have already closed - can't compete with Tim Hortons up here!).

I thought ... HUH? In the article, the bride said that the guests couldn't get to them fast enough, and that they didn't have enough for everyone, so some lost out. So, not only did they NOT have a proper cake, they also didn't have enough donuts for everyone. Nice. icon_rolleyes.gif

costumeczar Posted 8 Nov 2009 , 10:30pm
post #30 of 48

I'd heard of the stacked doughnuts instead of a cake before, but that never appealed to me. Think of how a doughnut that's been sitting out for a while tastes, kind of hard and stale. Not what I want to eat for dessert.

Unless the people grabbing them had been at the bar for a while before, then it's like eating the hot dogs from the street vendors at Faneuil Hall at 2 in the morning. Anything tastes good if you have a buzz on.

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