Foam Core Versus Cake Boards

Decorating By wildwolves Updated 17 Jan 2013 , 5:25am by shebaben

wrightway777 Posted 5 Nov 2009 , 1:58pm
post #31 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_Arnett


Save yourself a bunch of work and wasted time running to craft stores to buy foam board.....you can now buy premade foamcore cake boards in many shapes and sizes and they are already covered with a waterproof and grease proof FDA approved styrene coating....all I do is glue a 1/2 inch ribbon around the outside edge of my 1/2 inch base board.

Visit http://store.foamboardsource.com/cake-boards.html for all shapes and sizes of pre-made boards.




Ok I found this ultra tempting so I did a quick cost analysis:
I can run to Hobby Lobby about 1x per month (they usually have their foamboard 50% off once a month) and buy 1 20" x 30 1/2" (with 1/2 thickness) for approx $2.50.
At the source above I would have to pay:
1/2" Square Cake Boards
(6 Count, White Color)
Size: : 10 inch    $20.95
Subtotal:   $20.95
Shipping:   $13.08 (they only ship UPS - & thats from NY to GA) (I'd hate to see shipping to NY to CA to WA)
Tax:   $0.00
Total:   $34.03

Which that means I would have to buy 1 sheet (cutting out 6 x 10" squares) my Hobby Lobby way which means I pay around $3 vs. $34.03

Items taken into consideration and final thoughts from the quick analysis above:
- I maxed the # of cake boards that one could cut from one sheet of foamboard (ideal # being 6 per board = 10")
- I would consider using this site for octagon shapes or circles cause yes circles are pain to cut IF they came down on their cost and their shipping. Like 12 instead of 6 for the money. But for squares...its not worth the money.
- shipping from that site is not so good. But yes, I understand that would probably even out a little the more that you order at one time. But I dont see the cost differential worth it.
- the site also charges extra for larger sizes, ie. the squares 12" - 16" will cost you an extra $6.30 - $25.60 per EACH 6. Choke!


Good thing about Hobby Lobby is if I want to buy a ton of foamboard at a time...all they do is write me a rain check and they order the rest I need and I pick it up when their next truck rolls in....I dont have to pay shipping. Easy!

wrightway777 Posted 5 Nov 2009 , 6:12pm
post #32 of 77

on best tool....found it... check out this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVy4cbdL1Tw&feature=related

greengyrl26 Posted 22 Dec 2009 , 6:48pm
post #33 of 77

So...does anyone else but me have trouble getting the boards the same size as the cake? I mean, a 9" cake pan does not produce a 9" cake (at least for me). I'm lucky to get an 8 1/2" cake! So my question is...how do you get your boards the right size? I've been putting the cake on mine, then trimming the board from there, but that leaves a jaggety, messy board, and I don't like it. But if I cut the board first, it always seems to be smaller than the cake! Any thoughts, ideas & suggestions are most welcome! (for cardboard, foamcore and/or anything else! Thanks in advance...

leah_s Posted 22 Dec 2009 , 6:53pm
post #34 of 77

Well, why would you want the board the same size as the cake?

The icing goes between the edge of the board and the cake. Hold your bench scraper vertical and use the edge of the board as a guide for smoothing.

AngelFood4 Posted 22 Dec 2009 , 7:27pm
post #35 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

The icing goes between the edge of the board and the cake. Hold your bench scraper vertical and use the edge of the board as a guide for smoothing.




Exactly, Ditto! My cakes are always slightly smaller than the board but the little extra board sticking out is the perfect ledge to hold any buttercream or ganache. I then use the edge of the board as a guide for the bench scraper in getting very nice, smooth, straight and even sides.

Here's a picture of a cake I'm working on...you can see part of the board along the bottom under the ganache (the cake board is sitting over a piece of cling wrap then on top of a larger board so that as I move it around, I don't smoosh the edges).
LL

Cake_Mooma Posted 22 Dec 2009 , 7:46pm
post #36 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by greengyrl26

So...does anyone else but me have trouble getting the boards the same size as the cake? I mean, a 9" cake pan does not produce a 9" cake (at least for me). I'm lucky to get an 8 1/2" cake! So my question is...how do you get your boards the right size? I've been putting the cake on mine, then trimming the board from there, but that leaves a jaggety, messy board, and I don't like it. But if I cut the board first, it always seems to be smaller than the cake! Any thoughts, ideas & suggestions are most welcome! (for cardboard, foamcore and/or anything else! Thanks in advance...




Ok let me try to make this make sense. thumbs_up.gif I cut a piece of parchment to line the inside of the pan for baking. When I am done with the piece of parchment I trace the circle I just made for the pan onto the foamcore and cut that tracing out of the foamcore. When the cake comes out of the oven it is the size of the parchment so it will fit the foamcore. If there is any little bit of an edge when I ice the cake it will all get covered. I really hope that helps. icon_biggrin.gif I really like using the foamcore I find it to be stronger and with a well sharpened dowel it will go through the board. I use the thicker foamcore for the board and I have not had any problems with that. I just cover mine in foil or with fancyfoil whatever I have on hand.

The first thought I had when I saw the mentioned site for the foamcore bases was that they were pricey. I did like the shaped ones, so I think that I will be using for those but for the regular shaped ones (round and squares) I think I am going to stick with Michael's. Thanks for the information eitherway.

VIC

_Jamie_ Posted 22 Dec 2009 , 8:14pm
post #37 of 77

Ditto to Angel....don't you love how perfect it turns out?

I would never ever want my board to be smaller or the same size as the cake. I always rely on that edge for the icing guide. For perfect results like Angel just posted. icon_wink.gif

When I don't want the board to show, or I'm not going to put a border on, I ice on top of another board, a weebit larger than the cake board, and pop it off of the larger one when I'm done. Perfectly perfect and not a smidge of board showing.

adree313 Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 1:39am
post #38 of 77

i'm beyond beyond jealous of how perfect that ganache is. i think i may have even gasped out loud when i saw it icon_redface.gif

Cakepro Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 2:59am
post #39 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cake_Mooma

I cut a piece of parchment to line the inside of the pan for baking. When I am done with the piece of parchment I trace the circle I just made for the pan onto the foamcore and cut that tracing out of the foamcore.
VIC




It's much easier to simply trace the bottom of the cake pan you're baking the cake it. I use Bake Even Strips so my cakes don't pull away from the sides of the pan a great deal, and the difference between the cake sides and the foamcore is perfect for a layer of buttercream and a layer of fondant.

My parchment rounds aren't usually exactly round, so I would never use them as a guide for cutting my foamcore. LOL

Ruth0304 Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 3:33am
post #40 of 77

What a great question, I'm learning alot. I was doing it all wrong icon_cry.gif , it seems that making the foamboard a bit bigger (by tracing around the pan) is perfect for the purpose of guidance when adding icing to the cake as Angel noted. Now what do you guys use to lift up the cake and not smudge the icing when doing a tiered cake????


Thanks, Ruth

Cakepro Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 3:38am
post #41 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0304

Now what do you guys use to lift up the cake and not smudge the icing when doing a tiered cake????


Thanks, Ruth




An offset spatula or a cake lifter.

Ruth0304 Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 3:45am
post #42 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth0304

Now what do you guys use to lift up the cake and not smudge the icing when doing a tiered cake????


Thanks, Ruth



An offset spatula or a cake lifter.




Which one do you believe is better?

Cakepro Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 3:47am
post #43 of 77

Whichever one I happen to have at my right hand is better at that moment. I use them interchangeably...whatever I grab first. icon_smile.gif

Ruth0304 Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 3:55am
post #44 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Whichever one I happen to have at my right hand is better at that moment. I use them interchangeably...whatever I grab first. icon_smile.gif




Thanks, and Happy Holidays to all icon_biggrin.gif

madgeowens Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 4:23am
post #45 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakepro

Whichever one I happen to have at my right hand is better at that moment. I use them interchangeably...whatever I grab first. icon_smile.gif




haha me too, exactly. This is a great post. Learning something new here. So far I have only been using foamcore board to transport the cake....I don't like how cake boards suck moisture out of a cake, I need that in my yummy cakes icon_confused.gif

wrightway777 Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 7:24am
post #46 of 77

Reminder to all - now is the perfect time (well actually wait till after Xmas for the sales) to be buying "foiled wrapping paper" to cover your larger foamcore (what the hidden cake board rests on*). The foiled wrapping paper is easy to spot...its shiny usually thicker than regular and will cost more than the cheaper kind. Gold and silver are wonderful ones to stock, to use anytime of the year, but I can find tons of colors this time of year and they are nice and wide.

*I "adhere" the bottom of my hidden board by using double stick carpet tape (bought at Lowes). And just in case anyone is curious, no, the tape and foiled paper never touch the cake. I always "stake" the cake into the cake board for any cake that is higher than one tier too.

milissasmom Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 7:37am
post #47 of 77

I love using foam core!!!!!!!!!!!!!

CakeMommyTX Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 4:17pm
post #48 of 77

I use cardboard rounds under each cake and foam board for the base.
Never had a problem with bending and warping, but I don't use the Wilton boards, those bite.

greengyrl26 Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 4:34pm
post #49 of 77

I too am beyond jealous at how incredibly smooth that picture is. Bravo!!!
Thanks to all for the information. Apparently...I've been doing it wrong this entire time! I always cut the board smaller than the cake so it didn't show, but now I see how very helpful it could be to have it larger for a buttercream ledge. Genius! I can't wait to try this, I have a Santa cake to start tonight for dinner on Friday. Hopefully, this new information will make it MUCH easier!!!

lecrn Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 5:38pm
post #50 of 77

Sorry to highjack the thread, but does anyone use "feet" under their cake boards for tiered cakes to make lifting them easier? If so, what do you
use? It's a real pain trying sliding the cake to the edge of the table to lift.

_Jamie_ Posted 23 Dec 2009 , 6:10pm
post #51 of 77

____Perfectly Perfect No Border Showin Cake!____

For simplicitys sake, I am using a round cake as an example when Im describing the method. Same thing basically applies to square cakes though too.

You are using an extra board for this method of smoothing. So your cake is sitting on its board/circle/foam core by the time you begin the method Im going to explain. It is best, for this method, if you use a circle that is exactly the size of your cake, or slightly smaller.

After filling, crumbcoating, whatever you do, you place your cake on another board that is from 1/8th inch larger in diameter to however much larger you want it. All depends on how much icing you want on your cakes edge.

I have a masonite board for each and every tier size I offer. For example, for my 6 rounds, I have a board cut from masonite that is 1/8th inch diameter larger than the foam core board I place my 6 cake on.

This masonite is not the thick type that you cover with fondant or butcher paper for final presentation, this is a thinner, flexible type, at about 1/8th inch thick. Its smooth and glossy, and is probably called something else, but Im calling it masonite. Either way, Im sure its not hard to figure out.

So, you have secured your cake and its usual board to the larger one weve been discussing. I use a bench scraper that has no handle, exactly like the one you will find by Googling Progressive Bash and Chop. This can be found at Bed Bath and Beyond. Wherever you get it, whatever brand, no matter. The important part is that it be able to sit completely flush against the turntable AND the larger board. You will be smoothing by following the larger board.

When youre done, pop the whole thing in the fridge. Wait a couple of hours until it is firm. Take it back out, jimmy the larger board loose, slide a teeny spatula under it, whatever you want to break the cake loose from the larger board.

Admire your perfectly perfect cake, with not a smidge of border showing, because if done right, you have completely hidden it by using a second board to ice against. Wash up the larger masonite board, and store for future use.

tirby Posted 8 Feb 2010 , 11:15pm
post #52 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

I use cardboard rounds under each cake and foam board for the base.
Never had a problem with bending and warping, but I don't use the Wilton boards, those bite.




so which ones do you use??

wrightway777 Posted 9 Feb 2010 , 1:17am
post #53 of 77

I love foam core and dont trust cardboard to heavy loads...but if you must use cardboard.....
http://www.uline.com/Product/AdvSearchResult.aspx?keywords=round%20cake%20pad
there's tons of places to get rounds. You could always double up the rounds.

Lecrn - I use feet on some of my boards. I've gone to the wood section of Hobby Lobby and purchased the round doll pin things that look exactly like this link. Cheap with a 40% off coupon. Just hot glue (or super glue) the flat side to what will be the underside of the board. I do some in the middle and some on the sides...evenly dispersed of course depending on how large/heavy the whole cake is.
http://factorydirectcraft.com/catalog/products/2110_2235-7429-unfinished_wood_doll_pin_stands_package_of_20.html

tirby Posted 9 Feb 2010 , 2:24pm
post #54 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I use cardboards ALL the time and they are fine. I have never understood why people have a problem with them.




You use the SPS right?? so is that why the cardboard is strong enough?

greengyrl26 Posted 9 Feb 2010 , 2:46pm
post #55 of 77

I use cardboards in between my tiers all the time too & have never had an issue. But I use masonite for the main board at the bottom.

Mug-a-Bug Posted 9 Feb 2010 , 4:43pm
post #56 of 77

In regard to cutting out foamcore: I found that the best way is to take an SPS plate and poke your foamboard with the little peg to keep it from sliding. Then cut around it with your exacto knife. It's still a pain, but I found this much easier than trying follow a line. Hope that makes sense icon_confused.gif I wish I could buy these pre-cut a little more cost effective. icon_rolleyes.gif

onlymadaresane Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 3:00am
post #57 of 77

there is so much information on here!

I now realize I've been doing it wrong. So wrong.

wrightway777 Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 11:33am
post #58 of 77

anyone use a bandsaw to cut their foamcore like CCC?

pieceacake830 Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 12:37pm
post #59 of 77

I use a jigsaw. makes a bit of a mess though.... so I cut it in the basement... icon_sad.gif

wrightway777 Posted 10 Feb 2010 , 1:04pm
post #60 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by pieceacake830

I use a jigsaw. makes a bit of a mess though.... so I cut it in the basement... icon_sad.gif




for the final product does it cut cleaner that an exacto knife?

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