Lovemesomecake Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 11:55pm
post #1 of

WHAT is happening to my fondant on the frankenstein??? I covered it last night and everything loooked fine...then by this afternoon it looked like this!! icon_eek.gificon_cry.gif
LL
LL

20 replies
jensenscakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 11:57pm
post #2 of

did you put too much icing on underneath the fondant?

Lovemesomecake Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 12:02am
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by jensenscakes

did you put too much icing on underneath the fondant?




No! Not at all. icon_sad.gif I put a VERY thin crumb coat.

prterrell Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 12:04am
post #4 of

Looks to me like the cake settled.

Lovemesomecake Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 12:08am
post #5 of

GEEZ! This would be my second cake this weekend w/ settling issues!! (other one was buttercream) So, from now on how long should I wait to let the cake settle???

KathysCC Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 12:15am
post #6 of

Yes, there was probably some cake settling or some weight from the upper tiers that settled on the lowest tier. A tiny difference in the support system can squish the lowest tier.

Doug Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 12:32am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovemesomecake

GEEZ! This would be my second cake this weekend w/ settling issues!! (other one was buttercream) So, from now on how long should I wait to let the cake settle???




a) overnight -- at least 12 hours

b) Leah's faster method -- put heavy ceramic tile on top (or other similar weighted smooth flat item) and let sit for 4 or so hours.

c) my I'm NOT waitin' method -- take large cookie sheet, place on top, spread hands apart and fingers wide --- PUSH gently but firmly until the edges "give birth" to a little ring of filling/icing all the way around the edge. Remove sheet and carry on. If done correctly cake will be in one piece and fully settled.

leah_s Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 12:54am
post #8 of

Yep, I'm a believer in the ceramic tile method. Only takes 2-3 hours. I give the tile a gentle push. Only use 1 tile, and it should be roughly the size of the cake. I have 8" tiles, 12" tiles and 1, 18" tile. Do not try to double up the tiles to speed up the process - voice of experience.

nia0524 Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 1:16am
post #9 of

good info

mkolmar Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 4:26am

I do something similar to leahs method but with books. Just takes 3 hours and your good to go.

madgeowens Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 5:00am

I never wait over night, unless of course I don't get to it until then, and never had this issue......maybe the fondant is too moist that its droopy? Either that or I have just been lucky.

__Jamie__ Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 5:40am
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

I never wait over night, unless of course I don't get to it until then, and never had this issue......maybe the fondant is too moist that its droopy? Either that or I have just been lucky.




icon_wink.gif Me neither. I fill, squish a bit with my hand, look at it for a minute, wrap it up in saran wrap and wait about an hour. Frost, chill, and cover with fondant.

Lovemesomecake Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 10:34am
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

I never wait over night, unless of course I don't get to it until then, and never had this issue......maybe the fondant is too moist that its droopy? Either that or I have just been lucky.




I think this might be what it is. B/c I did use the cookie sheet method to squish the cake down until some of the filling came out. And when I was rolling my fondant I noticed it was very moist and I kept adding sugar and I stopped b/c I didn't want to add too much. AND the weather here has been terrible. Constant rain. I'm thinking the fondant was too moist and too stretchy. icon_sad.gif

cabecakes Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 1:15pm

I don't think so, I agree with the previous posters that said settling. I almost looks like there are small lines of bubbles under the fondant. I should think that if it were a fondant issue the fondant would have stretched and looked "pulled" with small veins of cracking like faultlines. Your fondant looks "smooshed".

UpAt2am Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 1:55pm

definitely looks like a settling issue but here's the good thing.......frankenstein probably had a few wrinkles here or there and doesn't need to look perfect anyways icon_smile.gif don't worry about it...cake is cute and little goblins will love it icon_smile.gif

Trina36 Posted 16 Nov 2009 , 4:04am

I usually make MMF and never had a problem with the fondant sagging. Then I tried Satin Ice and I wouldn't make MMF again. Just recently, my fondant has been sagging so bad! I just had my first diaster with satin Ice sagging so much that the top tier fell even with 2 dowel sticks staked in the cake from the top down. So embarrased about that.

plbennett_8 Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 5:15am

I've noticed a lot of people complaining about problems with fondant recently... Commercial fondant, which should not sag... Perhaps they changed something in the fondant?

MrsNancyB1 Posted 21 Nov 2009 , 5:37am

I guess I'm seeing it a little bit differently because it looks like a LOT of air in the fondant. When I first saw the picture, my first thought was air bubbles. The fondant looks like it was 'over-worked' prior to putting it on the cake.

Cute cake idea BTW!

ruthi Posted 25 Nov 2009 , 9:13pm

What do you mean "overworked" fondant....it has to be kneaded to make it smooth before rolling, and plus, if adding color to a large batch, a lot of kneading is required to mix in the color....so, what is considered overworked, and when do you know when to stop??

summernoelle Posted 27 Nov 2009 , 1:02am

It settled-I let my cakes sit for 12-24 hours in the fridge and it helps a great deal.

JenniferMI Posted 12 Dec 2009 , 2:25am

My guess is not enough upper support???

Jen icon_smile.gif

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