Avoiding "the Bulge" When Layering

Decorating By jardot22 Updated 1 Nov 2009 , 4:05pm by cabecakes

jardot22 Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 4:51pm
post #1 of 15

Ok, so I should know this by now, but which is the proper way to stack 2 layers of cake (referring to cake layers, not tiers). I discovered last night that when I stacked the layers with the "bottoms" together, my bulge problem was reduced. I normally have the bulge issue to a degree on all my cakes (not horribly, but noticeable to me), even though I use a very thick dam, and trim the sides of my cake, and allow cakes to settle overnight before covering in fondant. In the past I have put the "bottom" of the cake down, then the top layer was bottom side up. So which way is standard? Thanks for any tips!

14 replies
txnonnie Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:02pm
post #2 of 15

I place the trimmed side down. Bottom layer on the board, fill then place the cut side of the next layer on the filling.

Renaejrk Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:19pm
post #3 of 15

I put the tops together, like you do. I trim mine the best I can if they are uneven, though I use flower nails as heating cores and don't have a dome - but sometimes the cakes are still a little crooked when they come out of the oven! lol It's easier to fill in those little spots with icing (and even extra cake if you have a big problem area) if they are stacked this way - at least for me!

txnonnie Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:27pm
post #4 of 15

Try taking your cakes from the pan, inserting a board in your pan, put the cake back in and then trim. Makes a cleaner more level cut.

Renaejrk Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:36pm
post #5 of 15

I've seen Indydebi say she levels by cutting off the top in her pan, but mine are usually nowhere near the top, even with adding a board, so it wouldn't help - I'd have to make my cakes thicker. I'm still figuring out how much batter I need - I'm a bad judge of how full the pan is, lol, and the recipe I use doesn't rise as much as others and is a very dense cake.

adree313 Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 8:00pm
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renaejrk

I've seen Indydebi say she levels by cutting off the top in her pan, but mine are usually nowhere near the top, even with adding a board, so it wouldn't help - I'd have to make my cakes thicker. I'm still figuring out how much batter I need - I'm a bad judge of how full the pan is, lol, and the recipe I use doesn't rise as much as others and is a very dense cake.




use a scale icon_smile.gif you can get a small electronic kitchen scale practically everywhere. i got mine at ross for 15 bucks i think. i weigh out my batter in each pan and i write down the weight on the recipe so i can remember what worked the best next time icon_smile.gif

FleurDeCake Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 8:04pm
post #7 of 15

good idea but how do you know how much weight to put in each pan... just trial and error?

adree313 Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 8:12pm
post #8 of 15

pretty much. the first time i around i fill it up about half way, weigh it, and see if it works. if it doesn't, i still write down the weight and make notes about how much more i think it needs. next time around, i add more and i usually get it down right. if not, do it again!

since i started collaring my pans, it only takes one time because there's little to no worry about it overflowing or falling in on itself. i fill it up about 3/4 of the way, weigh it, bake it off, and it's usually perfect. then you can use indydebi's trick of leveling off with the top of the pan and a long serrated knife.

gladysrdz24 Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 8:29pm
post #9 of 15

Hi,

I like to make a sort of "paste" out of the cake and water. The parts that are cut off the top is what I use. Anyways you crumble up the cake and put water enough to make a paste, sort of like a thick icing. Then you put this on the side of the cake to make it nice and even and smooth. You can put in the fridge for a bit and then its ready to ice. I use this all the time and it completely eliminates the cake bulge. PM if you need more instruction.

UltimateCakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 8:36pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Renaejrk

I put the tops together, like you do. I trim mine the best I can if they are uneven, though I use flower nails as heating cores and don't have a dome - but sometimes the cakes are still a little crooked when they come out of the oven! lol It's easier to fill in those little spots with icing (and even extra cake if you have a big problem area) if they are stacked this way - at least for me!




Same here. Love the flower nails!!!

JustToEatCake Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 1:03am
post #11 of 15

I'm a noob and this is my first post but I think OP meant the bulge she gets on the sides of her cake, not the dome. I could be wrong though.

-K8memphis Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 1:13am
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gladysrdz24

Hi,

I like to make a sort of "paste" out of the cake and water. The parts that are cut off the top is what I use. Anyways you crumble up the cake and put water enough to make a paste, sort of like a thick icing. Then you put this on the side of the cake to make it nice and even and smooth. You can put in the fridge for a bit and then its ready to ice. I use this all the time and it completely eliminates the cake bulge. PM if you need more instruction.




Water? Never heard of that. Wow. Interesting.

-K8memphis Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 1:18am
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustToEatCake

I'm a noob and this is my first post but I think OP meant the bulge she gets on the sides of her cake, not the dome. I could be wrong though.




I think you're right. However, the dome does need to be leveled off too.

The deal about icing is that it is a great substance for filling in areas but if your surfaces are already level and smooth it's a lot easier to ice the cake.

And obviously it has the capacity to have a mind of it's own so making things level and smooth is ever the more important huh.

ninatat Posted 1 Nov 2009 , 3:32pm
post #14 of 15

i've read on here letting the cake settle over nite, and also they put something on top of the cake, one girl used a left over 12x12 tile from when she redid her bathroom, with my fondant cake i got buldges when i put to much bc on it, and the next time for side buldges i''m going to put something on top for side buldges

cabecakes Posted 1 Nov 2009 , 4:05pm
post #15 of 15

For the poster that said her cakes come out of the oven unlevel...you may want to put a level on you stove to see if your stove is level. I was having this problem also...I had DH level my stove and no more problems. Just a thought.

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