bevcakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 2:36am
post #1 of

Hi! So, age old question....do you all chill your cake before applying the fondant? By chilling, I don't mean a brief flash in the fridge to set the crumb coat - I mean, do you refrigerate the whole cake for hours, and then put it on?

I ask because I usually get condensation when my cake is refrigerated for a long time, and I read that having a cold cake will cause this. On the other hand, I do know some cake decorators do this.

Thanks![code:1:f5f98b226b][/code:1:f5f98b226b]

21 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 2:41am
post #2 of

I chill my cakes first. For a few hours if I have time, or as long as I can otherwise. It's much easier to get a nice finish on the fondant on a cold cake, at least for me.

madgeowens Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 2:51am
post #3 of

I like to chill it just so if I put the fondant on, and it needs moved, this allows that without messing up the buttercream........thats if you are using BC

lilthorner Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 2:51am
post #4 of

i try (said try) to chill my cakes overnight. then i fondant and throw them right back in.. the fondant gets hard, and when it's time to decorate it will start to have condensation but it drys back up.. and when the cake is room temp, the fondant is back pliable again

Rylan Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 3:07am
post #5 of

My cakes are usually chilled for more than an hour before I put the fondant on. I never had a problem with it.

bevcakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 3:28am
post #6 of

Thanks! Hmm..I wonder why I always get condensation almost immediately after I put fondant on? This has happened both with MMF and also a fondant recipe I have that uses glucose and glycerin. It's not humid where I live, either...

momma28 Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 3:38am
post #7 of

i always chill for at least a couple of hours before I fondant. I dont usually have a condensation issue. Sorry I cant shed any light on your dilemma

ApplegumKitchen Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 3:40am
post #8 of

I NEVER put fondant on a chilled cake - but then my cakes do not have fillings that require refridgeration - I only use ganache at room temp

Texas_Rose Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 3:47am
post #9 of

My cakes/fillings don't usually require refrigeration. It's just easier for me to work with a cold, hard cake than a warm, wiggly one icon_biggrin.gif It gets a bit of condensation on it, nothing that drips off the cake or anywhere near that much, just will look slightly frosted for a few minutes, then evaporate. It's very humid where I live but I run the AC and a dehumidifer when I'm working with fondant, so that might be why I don't have more condensation issues.

bevcakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 4:57am

Thanks for the tips! I will try again. Maybe I will use a fan to dry any condensation.

CakeMommyTX Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:15am

What do you use to roll your fondant out with,shortening or cornstarch?
I've always refrigerated my cakes at least overnight before I cover them with mmf.
I used to use Crisco to roll out my fondant and I had big issues with condensation forming while I was still putting the mmf on the cake. I've since switched to cornstarch and no more problems.

MrsSoul Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:03am
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

What do you use to roll your fondant out with,shortening or cornstarch?
I've always refrigerated my cakes at least overnight before I cover them with mmf.
I used to use Crisco to roll out my fondant and I had big issues with condensation forming while I was still putting the mmf on the cake. I've since switched to cornstarch and no more problems.





I agree with this one. I frezze my cakes straight from the oven. It seals in the moisture. I carve, coat, Ice and decorate my cakes cold. If moisture starts to form on the cake I trun on a small fan on low to keep it dry. The cake is always fresh tasting like it was baked the same day. I got this trick from a lady on you tube. works like a charm. and allows me to bake several cakes and have them on stand by.

momma28 Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:00pm

I use cornstarchand never have issues with sweating right after I cover

lilthorner Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:09pm

I use either cornstarch or my ateco blue mat. More often than not I have been using cornstarch.

Loucinda Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:10pm

I never refrigerate/freeze either. Never have any problems covering the cakes because the cake isn't cold.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:11pm

Absolutely chilled. And you can dust two fondant smoothers with cornstarch and smooth that sucker with some force with both smoothers, for sharp edges. Works like a dream.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:12pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by bevcakes

Thanks! Hmm..I wonder why I always get condensation almost immediately after I put fondant on? This has happened both with MMF and also a fondant recipe I have that uses glucose and glycerin. It's not humid where I live, either...




You're not working fast enough then.

__Jamie__ Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:12pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumKitchen

I NEVER put fondant on a chilled cake - but then my cakes do not have fillings that require refridgeration - I only use ganache at room temp




Aha. Now, with ganache, this is absolutely true. thumbs_up.gif

Caths_Cakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:20pm

i only ever chill just to firm the buttercream up really, Im from britian so its not hot at all lol, i have had trouble with condensation and i hate it, I prefer to work with it all getting sticky and being able to do everything with out having to wait for my cake to 'dry'.

cake_whimsy Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 10:18pm

Here's the thing- it all depends on the temperature DIFFERENCE. If you bring a cold cake into a warm room and fondant it, you are going to get both condensation and probably bubbles as the cake expands from the heat. If you bring a cold cake into a cooler or air-conditioned room, you should be fine. Especially if you have a fan on! Its all about not making the two different tems fight each other.

KathysCC Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 12:12am

I don't understand the purpose of chilling a cake before fondant. If you are going to serve and present the cake at room temperature, then the changes in temp could be disastrous for your cake, especially in super humid climates like where I live. I tried chilling the cake once and the condensation was awful. Now I never chill my cakes and have no problems applying fondant.

__Jamie__ Posted 31 Oct 2009 , 1:26am
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathysCC

I don't understand the purpose of chilling a cake before fondant. If you are going to serve and present the cake at room temperature, then the changes in temp could be disastrous for your cake, especially in super humid climates like where I live. I tried chilling the cake once and the condensation was awful. Now I never chill my cakes and have no problems applying fondant.




If you would refer to several responses, mine included it says exactly why we do it. I have never had disasters doing this, and probably never will.

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