My First Cake Order!!!

Business By MammaG Updated 2 Nov 2009 , 2:18am by sweet-thing

MammaG Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 1:26am
post #1 of 10

I'm just now starting to make cakes and want to branch out to making it a very small business. In order to get more practice and my name out there I have offered to do a few cakes only for cost of ingredients -- no profit. I have my first order for next weekend for 30-35 people. How do I know how big to make the cakes? Where can I find something that tells me how many each cake will serve? And what about 3D cakes? How do you know on those? Thanks so much for your patience.

9 replies
patticakesnc Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 1:34am
post #2 of 10
aggiecakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 1:39am
post #3 of 10

I usually use the chart posted by patticakesnc and then include a cutting chart so the customer can really get the number of slices they are supposed to get. you can download a cutting chart on earlenescakes.com

Enter her site and then click on cake serving instructions down towards the bottom of the page. There is a cutting chart for maximizing the servings in round cakes. Rectangular and square cakes are not as difficult to figure when cutting, but most people seem to cut a round cake like you would a pie and then they give really giant pieces.

leah_s Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 2:25am
post #4 of 10

Stick with the Wliton charts. Earlene's charts and cutting guide will have you giving away cake for free.

minicuppie Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 1:01pm
post #5 of 10

You sound a bit frazzled. My suggestion is to go to the library and check out a bunch of cake construction and decorating books. Then get on this site and start reading. Knowledge is power.

MammaG Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 3:31pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by minicuppie

You sound a bit frazzled. My suggestion is to go to the library and check out a bunch of cake construction and decorating books. Then get on this site and start reading. Knowledge is power.




Would those books tell me serving sizes?

cakesdivine Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 4:51pm
post #7 of 10

The wilton books will, but before you go making cakes for any money at all, check with your local Health Dept. to make sure you can legally do cakes from your home, most states it is illegal to produce cakes from one's home kitchen and those that do allow it still require you to purchase a license and/or have your kitchen inspected.

tiggy2 Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:09pm
post #8 of 10

indydebi's cutting chart is the best. Her website is www.cateritsimple.com

Adevag Posted 1 Nov 2009 , 11:39pm
post #9 of 10

There are so many cutting guides available for regular shapes, I don't know about 3D. I just want to advice you (because I have been thinking the same as you, to let somebody pay for ingredients to give me experience and build a portfolio for future possible small part time business). But what you will attract with the "no profit" offer is not going to be future customers. You will attract the opposite, all the ones who want something nice without paying the real price. Once you start charging you will have to start all over with fining customers. Just a thought...

sweet-thing Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 2:18am
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adevag

I just want to advice you (because I have been thinking the same as you, to let somebody pay for ingredients to give me experience and build a portfolio for future possible small part time business). But what you will attract with the "no profit" offer is not going to be future customers. You will attract the opposite, all the ones who want something nice without paying the real price. Once you start charging you will have to start all over with fining customers. Just a thought...




I totally agree with this. However, something that worked so well for me and got my little business off the ground was a variation of this. A lot of people I know knew that I did cakes as a hobby but I told all my neighbors and friends, etc. that i was starting a business and i needed them as guinea pigs. I tried out flavors with them, I made cakes for my portfolio and shared with my neighbors. Sometimes they would ask for cakes and would pay for ingredients. The thing that made the transition easy for me was that I told them all at the beginning that once i got going I would most definitely need to charge full price for everything. While I was getting things in place I let people know how much time and effort goes into it. They were all so supportive. Now they all get their cakes from me and refer all their friends and family to me. Maybe I got lucky but it really worked for me.

As for serving sizes, I use the wilton chart for pricing but let everyone know that they are small servings.

Sorry got a little off topic. icon_smile.gif

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