Melting White Chocolate

Decorating By teresacam Updated 30 Oct 2009 , 11:58pm by prterrell

teresacam Posted 29 Oct 2009 , 10:14pm
post #1 of 11

ive been asked to make a cake covered in white chocolate... would you recomment a white choc ganache?? How could I write on it?? Should I pipe dark choc over it???

10 replies
Rylan Posted 29 Oct 2009 , 10:55pm
post #2 of 11

I would recommend white chocolate ganache. Yes, you can pipe dark chocolate over it--it would look great. Just pipe it free hand with a piping bag.

Good luck.

prterrell Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 2:19am
post #3 of 11

I agree with Rylan's recommendations.

Sweet_Guys Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:33am
post #4 of 11

Rylan's recomendation is great. The one thing with ganache is your ratio of chocolate to heavy cream. If you do a 1:1 ratio, then it's that pourable, soupy consistency. If you do a 2:1 ratio of chocolate: cream, then you get more of a peanut butter consistency that you can spread on and let harden into a shell.

HTH

Paul

Bunsen Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:48am
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Guys

Rylan's recomendation is great. The one thing with ganache is your ratio of chocolate to heavy cream. If you do a 1:1 ratio, then it's that pourable, soupy consistency. If you do a 2:1 ratio of chocolate: cream, then you get more of a peanut butter consistency that you can spread on and let harden into a shell.

HTH

Paul




With white chocolate you need a 3:1 ratio to get it to harden.

teresacam Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 12:21pm
post #6 of 11

thanks for your help!!

ive been reading about different ganache... i tried on with just choc and butter melted over boiling water... what do you think of t his?

ApplegumKitchen Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 12:41pm
post #7 of 11

Depends on where you are - butter + room temperature + Australia - just DO NOT equate!

Technically what you are describing is NOT ganache

Ganache is CHOCOLATE & CREAM - been around since the 1890's

If you like the chocolate & butter - use it icon_biggrin.gif but we wary of thinking that it is ganache and will react like people have said 'ganache' will.


There must be NO confusion if you are putting 'ganache' UNDER fondant and it is NOT going to be refrigerated - you must stick to the 3:1 whitechocolate/cream ONLY or 2:1 dark chocolate/cream ONLY
This sets firm and allows you to smooth your fondant without it softening - adding butter will present BIG problems

Kay_NL Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 1:09pm
post #8 of 11

I like the taste of chocolate (any color/type) and butter, but the taste of chocolate ganache is heaven! icon_smile.gif Just my opinion of course, but I add a small bit of vanilla and sugar to the cream when I'm boiling it and I guess all that extra added fat from the cream makes it super delicious! I also think that not cooking chocolate helps it keep a better flavor since in ganache you just pour the hot cream mixture over the chocolate and it melts that way. icon_smile.gif

I need to navigate away from this post, I'm having mega chocolate cravings now... lol!

teresacam Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 11:00pm
post #9 of 11

Thank you all for your replies. Rylan I visited your website and am thrilled that I got advice from such a pro!!! You mentioned piping dark choc on the white ganache. I am still a beginner and have never piped choc. What is best way? Do I just melt the choc? or does it need something added??

Rylan Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 11:20pm
post #10 of 11

Thanks Teresacam. Hehe, I am far from being a pro--still new to this hobby. =]

I've piped chocolate a long time ago but it was really sloppy--I need more practice. I just melted the chocolate and put it in a piping bag with a really small tip. I didn't add anything else to it.

You can also use a strong ziploc bag and cut the end. Make sure you get a nice bag because I've had so many experiences with the bag blowing up. Oh and the parchment paper triangles works too.

prterrell Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 11:58pm
post #11 of 11

The best way to pipe chocolate is to melt the chocolate with a little (about 1 tbsp for every 12 oz of chocolate) shortening. Instead of using a regular piping bag with tip, either use a parchment cone or a plastic squeeze bottle that has a small tip.

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