Looking For Tips On How To Fondant This Cake

Decorating By bevcakes Updated 30 Oct 2009 , 10:36am by Bluehue

bevcakes Posted 29 Oct 2009 , 6:13pm
post #1 of 12

I'm making a cake that someone requested to look like this:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jellycakes/3411950590/in/set-72157600409373500/

Does anyone have tips on how to best cover this in fondant? The cake I'm making is only one flavor, but the picture looks like the cake was cut in half and each side was covered separately. I'm afraid if I cut in though it might not come back together nicely. The person I'm making it for is very particular though so I do want to make it look as close as possible. Thanks!

11 replies
majka_ze Posted 29 Oct 2009 , 6:33pm
post #2 of 12

Well, here (Czech republic) you can buy the pan in this form. Here is an excellent example, unfortunately not mine cake icon_sad.gif

Best you can do without the pan is to draw the form on paper and make a template and cut around it. Try to piece it back on paper to avoid possible problems.

Loucinda Posted 29 Oct 2009 , 6:35pm
post #3 of 12

Could you use the paisley set wilton has out now? (I haven't seen them in person to know if it would work for sure)

bevcakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 4:55am
post #4 of 12

Thanks for the example! I was more worried about whether or not I should cut the cake in half to make the design, since it's the same flavor anyways. But from the example, it does seem better and easier if I do.

madgeowens Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:52am
post #5 of 12

There were two cakes covered separately I don't know the name of the shape...but I have seen it on many cake supply sites. hth

tatorchip Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:57am
post #6 of 12

it kinda looks like my comma pans

madgeowens Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:11am
post #7 of 12

Is that what they are called? Thats what they look like, I was thinking haha....

tatorchip Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:24am
post #8 of 12

I think that is what they are called maybe I am wrong but I thought they were lol

bevcakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:31am
post #9 of 12

It is a yinyang symbol icon_smile.gif

Bluehue Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:38am
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tatorchip

it kinda looks like my comma pans





thumbs_up.gif Yep, thats what the pans are called - its just that the cake was styled into a yin and yang symbol.

As Lou mentioned - "paisely"........ they can be turned into that style of cake also.


OR
Butterfly wings.
Fairey wings.
Broken heart cake.

the styles are endless.


Bluehue.

paolacaracas Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 10:00am
post #11 of 12

That's just a round pan cut in yin yang stile, you don't need any special pans.
Cut it, cover the separated pieces and then put together again.

Bluehue Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 10:36am
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by paolacaracas

That's just a round pan cut in yin yang stile, you don't need any special pans.
Cut it, cover the separated pieces and then put together again.







Yes, the OP could do that - and i guess many do - as long as the cake she cooks is suitable for carving.

But IMO if possible, use the Comma Pans - as this will give you clean lines to work with and then you know that both shapes will be exact.
This is the reason why this shape of pan was bought out onto the market.

Perhaps you can find a supplier that hires out tins OP if you don't wish to buy them for a one off cake.

Bluehue.
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