Transporting Your Cakes In The Cake Safe?

Decorating By psurrette Updated 25 May 2010 , 10:52pm by Loucinda

psurrette Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 12:56am
post #1 of 46

Does anyone have one of these?
cakesafe.com
LL

45 replies
Win Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 1:11am
post #2 of 46

I'm just a hobby baker so, no, but the website is fascinating. I am always amazed at how truly the old adage, "Necessity is the mother of invention" applies. Did you see that if you submit a cake delivery story you could be eligible to win a medium sized box?

Kitagrl Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 1:21am
post #3 of 46

I'm not sure I understand why you'd need one?

prterrell Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 1:50am
post #4 of 46

I just use the large special occasion cardboard boxes by Bakery Crafts. You can get them at GSA. They are reusable.

Loucinda Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 2:50pm
post #5 of 46

Cool concept, but WOW on the prices!!

Win Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 4:03pm
post #6 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I'm not sure I understand why you'd need one?




Well... I wouldn't need one, but based on the website, they say they protect from inclement weather and one no longer needs to fear bad drivers and bumpy roads... the picture that brought to mind for me was the Food Network Challenge Shows that feature the people who drive across country to get their cakes to the OK Sugar Art Show without harm.

They sure do cost a lot though!

psurrette Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 5:52pm
post #7 of 46

I have heard many great things about these and no bad ones from people that have one. Yeah they are expensive BUT if it will save a cake just once then your money is well spent. Also the worry about sending other people to deliver is a great option because your cake will be save in thier hands. I never send anyone but myself on delivery and I wish I could! Also as for the people going to the OK Sugar art show. Those arent REAL cakes they are styrofoam. I think with one horrific cake mess you might think twice.... I know I am................. I have one to try this weekend I will let you know how it goes.

Caths_Cakes Posted 30 Oct 2009 , 6:13pm
post #8 of 46

They look good, But HOW expensive :O

indydebi Posted 1 Nov 2009 , 4:49pm
post #9 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by psurrette

Also as for the people going to the OK Sugar art show. Those arent REAL cakes they are styrofoam.



I've always wondered why the big hub-bub about transporting cakes to the show. Fake cakes travel very well. Some no skid material and you're good to go. What am I not understanding? icon_confused.gif

costumeczar Posted 1 Nov 2009 , 9:44pm
post #10 of 46

I use materials bought at cardboard box.com and non-skid mat.com to transport my cakes, lol!

CakeDiva73 Posted 1 Nov 2009 , 10:25pm
post #11 of 46

omg, I was just going to post something about this! Saw a little pop-up on Facebook and decided to check it out but they were really expensive. Took forever for my computer to load the video but it looks like something hold it from the top???

Very strange..... and so freaking expensive I can't believe it!

CakeDiva73 Posted 1 Nov 2009 , 10:26pm
post #12 of 46

So wait, you need to use different internal supports, right? I use the SPS so how would it work?

CakeDiva73 Posted 1 Nov 2009 , 11:31pm
post #13 of 46

Well the SPS are plastic plates that snap into legs, like little tables so the 'rod' wouldn't go thru it, that's for sure. Then do you pull the whole rod out at the wedding site? And cover the hole?

CakeDiva73 Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 12:22am
post #14 of 46

I think it looks great and I'm not knocking it (so let me know if I am misunderstanding) but how are you not having to worry about supports and stuff? I realize this makes transport easier but once it's set up, it still needs to stay set up (oy, my fear of cake-fall icon_sad.gif ). I guess I worry about the rod pushing into the cake, etc.

Do you just use thick cardboard rounds between the cake layers? Do you pre-drill the holes? How does it work on elevated cakes? (Where there is space between the tiers?)

joy5678 Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 12:41am
post #15 of 46

I'm wondering how you make sure the cake is centered so that the rod goes straight thru the middle without missing the bottom hole? I also can't understand how one rod thru the middle can keep the cake from moving? hehe takes me awhile to catch on! icon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 12:43am
post #16 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakelady01523

. I love not having to spend a lot of time on dowels and supports. And even though it does cost quite a bit up front, the engineering is amazing. .




This doesn't mean that you're not using dowels as a support system inside the cake, does it? You do have a support system to support the tiers, right? I assume that the rod that goes to the cake safe is just a stabilizer for transporting it, it shouldn't have anything to do with the cake's internal support system.

CakeDiva73 Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 1:23am
post #17 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

Quote:
Originally Posted by cakelady01523

. I love not having to spend a lot of time on dowels and supports. And even though it does cost quite a bit up front, the engineering is amazing. .



This doesn't mean that you're not using dowels as a support system inside the cake, does it? You do have a support system to support the tiers, right? I assume that the rod that goes to the cake safe is just a stabilizer for transporting it, it shouldn't have anything to do with the cake's internal support system.




That's what I was getting at. I think mabye she meant additional transportation-support? I just can't wrap my head around the guts of a cake with this pole thru it unless it sells special gear to use with it and lining up that rod sounds tricky. I still can't get the blessed video to load.... has anyone seen it?

Loucinda Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 1:27am
post #18 of 46

I think you use just foamcore or cardboard for the plates - it won't work if you use the SPS system. (unless maybe you pre-drill holes in each plate?) I use foamcore and the bubble tea straws, so it would work fine for me, IMO.

__Jamie__ Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 1:33am
post #19 of 46

No center dowel. In three short words...that's it. All other support structure is necessary.

cas17 Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 2:05am
post #20 of 46

still not sure how you could get the rod through the center of the cake and foam boards as joy5678 mentioned.

chefjulie Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 2:11am
post #21 of 46

It's taking the place of your center dowel. It's the same exact concept, except it's a metal rod built into the lid instead of an "independent" wooden stick.

cas17 Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 2:34am
post #22 of 46

thank you cakelady01523. the sharpened point would certainly help but how do you make sure that it gets nicely centered in the cake and also into the hole in the base?

__Jamie__ Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 2:46am
post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakelady01523

The rod goes through the bottom of the box and out by ½", so it can't come out unless you pull it from the top. The white "guide" that sits in the box lid is long enough that the stainless steel rod always goes through straight to the bottom hole, which is a funnel-shape so there's no "missing" the hole.




You just do it. You can't mess it up.

CakeDiva73 Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 2:55am
post #24 of 46

So am I understanding that the silver foamcore bases are necessary instead of the pressed wood cake bases? I didn't realize it literally cake out the bottom, lol, but it does sound stable.

The concept is interesting.....I think I shall set the hub upon the task of making me something like this. (Ok, this won't be easy but he has too much time on his hands!) icon_smile.gif He needs a project....... and I could use this.

The only bummer is I have already invested in the SPS and love it as well as the fact that I bought alot of the wood bases too......

chefjulie Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 2:59am
post #25 of 46

You COULD use the wood bases, you'd just have to drill a 3/8" hole in the center to fit the SS rod.

Win Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 3:01am
post #26 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by psurrette

Also as for the people going to the OK Sugar art show. Those arent REAL cakes they are styrofoam.


I've always wondered why the big hub-bub about transporting cakes to the show. Fake cakes travel very well. Some no skid material and you're good to go. What am I not understanding? icon_confused.gif




It's not the cake (I know they're styrofoam, Psurrette)... it's the sugar flowers, etc. that don't transport well for hundreds of miles. Every bump "clanks" them together. The furthest I've traveled to compete is 200 miles and the "cake" itself is fine, but there are always repairs to be made to the flowers, and smaller, finer details such as string work, etc.

wildwolves Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 3:52am
post #27 of 46

This looks awesome! a liitle expensive.. but if if saves just one or two cakes then it has paid for itself... hmm something that i would love to get if my business gets started.. icon_smile.gif

dandelion56602 Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 4:33am
post #28 of 46

I don't understand what keeps the actual cake from sliding off individual boards, splitting the cake & sliding right through the rod.

(I think I dropped a brick when I saw the prices)

wildwolves Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 4:54am
post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dandelion56602

I don't understand what keeps the actual cake from sliding off individual boards, splitting the cake & sliding right through the rod.

(I think I dropped a brick when I saw the prices)




I think the only thing stopping the cake from sliding off would be your cake support and boards.. I guess if you made sure the cake was "glued" to your boards with buttercream then they should not slide off..

dandelion56602 Posted 2 Nov 2009 , 5:27am
post #30 of 46

I'm just thinking of the stories of the false security that a center dowel gives. I'm wondering what's the difference between a wooden center dowel & this, except the box of course

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