How Thick Is Your Fondant?

Decorating By gloria Updated 27 Oct 2009 , 2:34pm by Cristi-Tutty

gloria Posted 24 Oct 2009 , 10:49pm
post #1 of 27

I just watched a video on putting fondant on a square cake. She says her fondant is 1/4 inch thick. To me it looked thicker than that.

I have been making mine about 1/8 inch thick. Am I doing it too thin????

26 replies
luvmysmoother Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 12:15am
post #2 of 27

I also tend to roll thinly (1/8 inch) Fondant is so heavy I'm always afraid I'm going to smush my cake if I roll too thick. I might try it 1/4" on a small 6" cake and see if there's a difference...thanks for the tipicon_smile.gif

pattycakesnj Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 12:25am
post #3 of 27

I roll thin too just because I don't like a lot of fondant. You just have to be more careful not to tear it when it is thinner. Obviously, the thicker it is, the easier to handle.

KoryAK Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 1:27am
post #4 of 27

Over 1/4" is ridiculous. I roll mine 1/8"

Jeff_Arnett Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 1:31am
post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by gloria

I just watched a video on putting fondant on a square cake. She says her fondant is 1/4 inch thick. To me it looked thicker than that.

I have been making mine about 1/8 inch thick. Am I doing it too thin????


Depends on the brand...with Satin Ice I can roll it to between 1/8 and 1/16 inch thick with no problems.

TheSugaredBouquet Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 1:35am
post #6 of 27

I use a homemade fondant and usually roll about 1/8" thick. I don't like a lot of fondant.

sugarshack Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 2:30am
post #7 of 27

a little bit under 1/4 inch

indydebi Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 2:55am
post #8 of 27

I'm a fondant newbie, but one of the reasons I stayed away from fondant for so long is that I saw all of this pics of cakes with THICK fondant and to me, they just looked like Play-Doh cakes, and I wasn't putting my name on anything that looked like that. I admired the talent it took to create those cakes ...... the final look of "play-doh" was just not something that I liked to see.

When I started playing with it, I prefer to roll it thinner. I just like the look better.

cabecakes Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 5:11am
post #9 of 27

I use the marshmallow fondant and I roll it maybe slightly thicker than 1/8". I used to roll it thinner, but I found that it would tear to easily. I also do not like a thick layer of fondant on my cake.

__Jamie__ Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 5:46am
post #10 of 27

Chick down the street from me seems to think 1" is normal. I shall not correct her. icon_biggrin.gif

sugarandslice Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 11:23am
post #11 of 27

I think people use thicker fondant to cover up a less-than-perfect cake. That's why I use the ganache method, because it's so easy to get a super-smooth finish on the cake before putting a really thin layer of fondant on (although I am still a beginner, so working on the 'perfect' finish!)
I agree with PPs that the reason lots of people are turned off fondant is because it's too thick. No one wants a whole mouthful of fondant when they eat their cake.
I try for 3mm (about 1/8" I think). I have the wilton rolling pin rings and use the thinest one.

iwantcookies Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 12:15pm
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Quote:

Chick down the street from me seems to think 1" is normal.



EWW!

JenniferMI Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 1:16pm
post #13 of 27

Personally, I don't think you can roll it to thin. The thinner the better to most people's taste. I put a normal layer of icing and usually 1/8" or thinner on top of that. I use my semi-homemade white chocolate fondant. Good stuff icon_smile.gif

Jen icon_smile.gif

zoraya Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 3:22pm
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by JenniferMI

Personally, I don't think you can roll it to thin. The thinner the better to most people's taste. I put a normal layer of icing and usually 1/8" or thinner on top of that. I use my semi-homemade white chocolate fondant. Good stuff icon_smile.gif

Jen icon_smile.gif




ok, I have to know! Can you share what your semi-homemade white choc fondant is?

JenniferMI Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 3:31pm
post #15 of 27

Please PM me for more info on my fondant.

Jen icon_smile.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 3:39pm
post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by iwantcookies

Quote:
Quote:

Chick down the street from me seems to think 1" is normal.


EWW!




Yep, and if she was even remotely polite, I would correct her.

rainbow_kisses Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 7:34pm
post #17 of 27

I would say it depends on what work is being done on the fondant as to how think i roll. Usually about 4mm (no good with inches) but if it is to go on before a lot of fondant detail then i try and get it thinner still so that the build up does not get too bulky.

jlynnw Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 7:46pm
post #18 of 27

I think the lovely individuals who roll the fondant an inch thick are the ones giving fondant a bad name. I prefer the fondant as thin as I can make it, especially on old shapes.

kentuckyjode Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 7:47pm
post #19 of 27

Believe me...Jen's is the best fondant ever...tastes great and works like a dream!!!!

JenniferMI Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 7:53pm
post #20 of 27

Thanks Jode!

I personally think the BAD tasting fondants out on the market also give fondant a bad reputation. I can't tell you how many couples come over here...say they don't want fondant because of a wedding they attended. I always ask if I made the cake, thank God I never have - LOL, anyway, they taste my white choc. fondant, they order it. Simple as that. It doesn't have to taste bad... I LOVE the look of fondant... to me, they look like white chocolate is poured over the whole cake icon_smile.gif

Jen icon_smile.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 7:59pm
post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlynnw

I think the lovely individuals who roll the fondant an inch thick are the ones giving fondant a bad name. I prefer the fondant as thin as I can make it, especially on old shapes.




Oh you know it! Let's roll it thick and tell everyone you don't eat it anyways because it's yuchy. No kidding, anything an inch thick would be icky! It's really cool to be known for great fondant. Especially after they've been to her tasting, and then they get real fondant from me. Happy dancing after the comments I hear!

Sweet_Guys Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 2:54am
post #22 of 27

Jen is correct, too. Down here in Florida, people have been turned off to fondant because of the taste. It was that awful texture that certain companies make.

Like anything else in this business, it's all about marketing. We use Fondarific and Satin Ice. The more we educate people about the tastes of these two products, the more people we are "converting" to the fondant side. In fact, when we did a Tiki cake for a friend's birthday party, we had about 15 people that got quite an education about all it takes to make a custom cake versus the ole super-store cake.

Marketing pays off. Keep talking it up, people!!!! icon_smile.gif

Paul

jlynnw Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 10:08pm
post #23 of 27

It's amazing about the fondant and people who don't like it. I made a spider cake this weekend for a party of kids. They insisted not to make the cake in fondant. It would have looked so much better but they don't like it. I made a fall cake for a bake sale for the youth. The same people bought it. They really liked how it looked and tasted great. They were impressed I could ice bc that smooth icon_confused.gif They were surprised it was fondant and not as yucky as they thought. Wilton fondant an inch thick would be fowl.

icer101 Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 10:21pm
post #24 of 27

also, i have seen many cakes.. buttercream not smoothed good or ganache or smbc or imbc.... rolled fondant very thin.. and all bulges and whatever showed .. not pretty at all.. so we all have to make sure whatever is underneath the fondant looks good. some people think.. that just because they are going tocove it in fondant. they don,t have to be careful with the first coat of icing.. not true.. fondant covered cakes are suppose to be smooth and elegant looking...

diane706 Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 10:26pm
post #25 of 27

I had a mom and daughter come in for a wedding cake consultation. They absolutely did NOT want fondant but the cake picture they showed me was done in fondant and really wouldn't work too well with a buttercream finish only. So I asked, "would you like to at least try a little bit and see what you think? I asked the mom how she liked it and she said "I'm really surprised!! I love it!" (It was Fondarific, btw). They booked the cake with fondant. thumbs_up.gif

JenniferMI Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 1:38pm
post #26 of 27

Diane,

That happens to me time and time again...... I can't count the number of times.

Yes, your cake UNDER the fondant does have to be smooth. If it is, you should not see flaws in your fondant from what is under it.

Jen icon_smile.gif

Cristi-Tutty Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 2:34pm
post #27 of 27

Thank you everyone for this information. I really learned a lot with all this....and about the fondant products thanks icon_wink.gif

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