cakesrock Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 12:21am
post #1 of

Okay, this may be a weird question, but do you/can you wash wooden dowels before you use them? I"m thinking about hygiene here. I bought some that were loose and then I transported them, cut them etc. They weren't in a package and I don't know what they were germs they exposed to. Then I'm just shoving them in a cake that people will eat?

Am I being paranoid? Should I not be using this type of dowel? I can see that plastic would be washed and there wouldn't be an issue, but what about wooden?

Thanks! icon_smile.gif

27 replies
mccowen73 Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 12:34am
post #2 of

yes you can wash them, just let them dry before using them. I always wrap mine in press n seal.

madgeowens Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 12:41am
post #3 of

You can always boil them for ten minutes and then they are sterile......I would NEVER wrap them in plastic....what if a piece comes off and a kid gets it caught in their throat...........no no no please don't do that

TheCakeDude Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 1:31am
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

what if a piece comes off and a kid gets it caught in their throat...........no no no please don't do that




...a little paranoid...but nonetheless, i see your point. Ive had great luck with thick straws, bought a box of 1000 for 10 bucks, and will probably last forever! easy to cut and very strong!

madgeowens Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 1:59am
post #5 of

I would rather be safe than sorry...........weird things happen every day......I don't like to go looking for it if ya know what I mean..........you have to be so careful.....

Texas_Rose Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 2:01am
post #6 of

I use the hollow plastic dowels...easier to cut and they seem so much cleaner.

agentdorkfish Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 2:45am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

You can always boil them for ten minutes and then they are sterile......I would NEVER wrap them in plastic....what if a piece comes off and a kid gets it caught in their throat...........no no no please don't do that



When it comes to kids, you need to be paranoid! I was watching this show on tv about kids swallowing random things. A 1 year old baby nearly got to the point where she couldn't breath because there was a mass in her throat. They had to cut her open to remove it. Turns out it was a little pink sequin that she had swallowed several months ago. Scar tissue had built up around it and just kept growing.

My point? Something very small can become a big problem.

madgeowens Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 2:59am
post #8 of

wow agentdorkfish..............excellent info to share.....your so right.....even older kids....I remember a kid 18 was sitting in his car opening a pack of floor mats for his car, he was at a driveinn hamburger joint, and no one was around...he bit into the plastic to open it and the plastic was sucked back across his wind pipe and he died right there..............freak things happen, thats just my point...be paranoid

JenniferMI Posted 24 Oct 2009 , 8:48pm
post #9 of

I cover them in thin aluminum foil, easy.... really...

Jen icon_smile.gif

lthiele Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 12:20am

Did you buy them from a cake supply store? The wooden ones I buy are loose as well, but my supplier told me they are a special type of timber that is not porous and that's why we use them for cake. I just wipe mine down with a clean towel before I use them. There has been a few threads about this before. Here is one

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=644833&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

KoryAK Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 1:31am

Wrapping in foil is going to be much more likely to leave pieces behind than wrapping plastic...

Limpy Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 12:15pm

I always slip the wooden dowel inside a drinking straw (thank you McDonalds) & then cut & then insert into the cake.This way the straw,not the wood is touching the cake,but you still have the support of the wooden dowel.

Bonniecakes08 Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 12:47pm

I use the wooden dowels as well. Where can I find the thick straws I have seen mentioned here? And also, does anyone use regular straws, like from McDonalds? Don't they bend? Also people keep mentioning the ? SPS system. I could not find it in the How To section as someone mentioned. What is this?

JenniferMI Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 1:13pm

There is no way of leaving any foil pcs behind using foil. I tuck the ends in/under as I roll on the rectangle pc. of foil. My thoughts on this are, plastic SLIDES.... with grease. I have been using the foil method literally for years with no problems at all.

Just my .02 icon_smile.gif

Jen icon_smile.gif

MissCakeCrazy Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 2:43pm

Texas rose, can you tell me where you get your hollow plastic ones from? Al
so, what do you use to cut it?

JGMB Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 5:10pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonniecakes08

Also people keep mentioning the ? SPS system. I could not find it in the How To section as someone mentioned. What is this?




Here's info about the SPS. I've never tried it, but other people swear by it. HTH!! http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-603925.html

prterrell Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 6:08pm

To answer some questions above:

NO, you can NOT use regular drinking straws. Some people have found success using the bubble tea straws, which are much larger diameter and made of a much thicker plastic.

The plastic dowels can be found at any cake supply store or any store that sells Wilton products. Also available online at GSA and www.countrykitchensa.com. Just use any serrated knife to cut.

SPS (single-plate system) is pretty near fool-proof. No cutting of dowels involved. Available at GSA.

KHalstead Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 6:23pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

wow agentdorkfish..............excellent info to share.....your so right.....even older kids....I remember a kid 18 was sitting in his car opening a pack of floor mats for his car, he was at a driveinn hamburger joint, and no one was around...he bit into the plastic to open it and the plastic was sucked back across his wind pipe and he died right there..............freak things happen, thats just my point...be paranoid




this exact thing happened to me when I was opening a board game, I couldn't breath for like 2 minutes solid....luckily I didn't panic and wound up being able to get the plastic out but it was a VERY scary moment for myself and my mom who was an onlooker! Needless to say I go and get a pair of scissors or something to open plastic packages now!

CakeWhizz Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 6:42pm

I HIGHLY recommend using SPS (many thanks to Leahs) especially if you are transporting your cakes over any distance.
Happy to send you the instructions if you send your email address to me.

PinkZiab Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 7:19pm

You can wipe the dowels down with a weak bleach water solution (like a tablespoon of bleach to a gallon of hot water). Immediately some will respond to this post shrieking that you can't use bleach because it will be in food (happen every time I say this), but YES you can. It's a very commonly used sanitizing agent in almost every restaurant kitchen. But I stress a WEAK solution... it shouldn't smell like the community pool in July.

Cakepro Posted 26 Oct 2009 , 8:04pm

YES, you CAN use regular drinking straws, and they are especially great for smaller cakes. I have been using them for years.

KoryAK Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:10pm

Ditto PP, I use plain ol' drinking straws for cakes up to 4 tiers high. They taught me that in school and it has been working for me for 6 years. icon_smile.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

Ditto PP, I use plain ol' drinking straws for cakes up to 4 tiers high. They taught me that in school and it has been working for me for 6 years. icon_smile.gif




Rose Levy Berenbaum (author-Cake Bible) talks about how she started using plain ole straws and wishes she could have patented it. Don't know how she coulda done that.... icon_confused.gif

metria Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:18pm

Toba Garrett says she uses lollipop sticks. Anyone have an good/bad experience with those?

__Jamie__ Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:23pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by metria

Toba Garrett says she uses lollipop sticks. Anyone have an good/bad experience with those?




That would not be something I would even think about doing.

Bonniecakes08 Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:30pm

I just did a two-tiered cake using skewers, (like for making shishkabobs) DISASTER!!! The cake fell apart! Seeing as they are about the size of a lollipop stick, I wouldn't recommend either. I had 4 in the first layer, and then one down through both layers. The cake was an 8" and 6" layer, and for some reason I found the skewers and decided to try them. OMG, never again! The cake also had several cute pumpkins made of fondant on top, I don't know if they were too heavy and pulled the cake over?? You can see the cake (before disaster) in my pictures.

__Jamie__ Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:31pm

Skewers?? With pointy ends?

JenniferMI Posted 27 Oct 2009 , 11:46pm

If there is one thing you should NEVER skimp on, it's the support system in your cakes. Use STURDY supports.... always....always..... icon_smile.gif

Jen icon_smile.gif

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