That's It!!!! I Don't Do Petit Fours!!!!

Decorating By prterrell Updated 26 Oct 2009 , 1:23am by Win

prterrell Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 3:41pm
post #1 of 33

icon_mad.gif Well that's about 4 hours of my life down the drain and a whole bunch of $$$ in the form of crappy falling apart bits of cake and icing in the trash. icon_mad.gificon_cry.gif Fortunately, this wasn't for an order. We have a funeral reception at church (the mother of one of my friends died Sunday) and I was trying to do something special. Good thing no one knows what I was trying to make! Only thing now is, I don't really have time to do something else. icon_cry.gif

And no, they are not salvadgeable.

I'm gonna be in one p!ssy mood for the rest of the day.

32 replies
tatorchip Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 3:58pm
post #2 of 33

at least you were trying to do something nice for someone and that is what God knows doing or try doing something for someone is a blessing. I love you for that.

Donnagardner Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:00pm
post #3 of 33

What about cake balls? Turn your scraps into cake balls.

kakeladi Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:10pm
post #4 of 33

I know how hard it is to get very nice looking petit fours! They are not something I like to do either.
Yes, cake balls are easier and can look almost as nice.

sugaah Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:11pm
post #5 of 33

What happened to them? Why did they not turn out?

__Jamie__ Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:14pm
post #6 of 33

Yep, I declined a request for those yesterday too...no thanks!

prterrell Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:32pm
post #7 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugaah

What happened to them? Why did they not turn out?




The cake started to fall apart when I was coating them and then the ones that hadn't fallen apart, the icing just looked like crap.

I've never made cake balls before and I don't have any chocolate to dip them in any way. At this point I don't want to try anything new or anything getting coated in anything.

sugaah Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:35pm
post #8 of 33

icon_smile.gif - been there, done that. From this forum I thought it was just me. Let's not give up. We'll both try again later.

Texas_Rose Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 5:00pm
post #9 of 33

I was reading about making petit fours with a special mold. You coat the inside of the mold with chocolate, stick the cake pieces in, and then cover the bottoms with more chocolate, and then pop them out of the mold. That would be faster than the way I've done them, covering with rolled fondant.

Still, I'm not making them for anyone either. My sister keeps hinting that she wants some more but she can keep on hinting. Those little bitty bits of cake drive me nuts. And then for the hours they take to make, watching her cram them in her mouth like little debbie cakes isn't any fun either.

prterrell Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 5:16pm
post #10 of 33

I don't like the taste of the hard chocolate on the cake. I was doing the quick poured fondant. We ate a few before I trashed them. They tasted yummy. Too bad they look so bad.

They really just aren't cost effective with the amount of labor you have to put into them.

I'll stick to mini cupcakes. They're easy.

littlecake Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 6:27pm
post #11 of 33

join the club...we need t shirts.

michellenj Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 6:37pm
post #12 of 33

Oooooooh, I HATE petit fours!

leah_s Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 6:57pm
post #13 of 33

I charge $684948204957239 per petit four. I'd be happy to make some for you.

aundron Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:01pm
post #14 of 33

I've tried petit fours once; that was 2 years ago!! It was a disaster!! For those who can make them; God bless you, you have a wonderful gift!!

TexasSugar Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:03pm
post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

I was reading about making petit fours with a special mold. You coat the inside of the mold with chocolate, stick the cake pieces in, and then cover the bottoms with more chocolate, and then pop them out of the mold.




Those are from Kathy Scott I think. I have some and have used them a total of once. They were probably quicker than the other way, but they were still time consuming and I had issues getting them back out of the mold. They are also larger than your typical petit four size.

You can use crisco or paramount crystals in the chocolate to help it have less of a crunch.

Loucinda Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:03pm
post #16 of 33

icon_lol.gif (what Leah said!) I HATE doing those little buggars, I know newbies think I am nuts when I tell them to charge an arm and a leg for them.......(but then they try to make them and KNOW what I mean!!) thumbs_up.gif

Suzycakes Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:05pm
post #17 of 33

Okay - don't throw cake balls at me -- and trust me when I say this "I have very little patience - period!" But I really don't mind making petit fours at all - I can whip out four dozen in a little over an hour. I have an order for those 4 dozen for this weekend - I'll make the little flowers for them tonight and just pop them on while the icing is still damp.

You have to work with frozen cake and work quickly. And with the poured fondant you are not going to cover every bit of the cake - if you start trying to do that - then you are screwed and will end up with 'crumby' icing. I put them in the mini cupcake liners to look nice and my customers love them!

I'm sorry they didn't work out for you - and especially since you were wanting them for such a sincere occasion.

Suze

CakeDiva73 Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:17pm
post #18 of 33

I was at the local cake dec. store the other day and they had just had classes for petit fours using chocolate and Oreo molds (although I believe any mold witll do).

Haven't had a chance to try them quite yet but they looked interesting. Aparently you coat inside of mold. cut discs of cake with slighly smaller cutter, layer cake and filling inside mold, top of with chocolate and once it's set, invert and viola - a chocolate petit four-ish type treat.

Pourable fondant seems intimidating (not sure why...maybe I am just lazy) but I also read that you can microwave a crusting icing recipe and get a similar texture.

CakeDiva73 Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:18pm
post #19 of 33

oops, didn't read prevous posts...looks like the chocolate thing was already suggested! icon_redface.gif

Win Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:30pm
post #20 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzycakes

Okay - don't throw cake balls at me -- and trust me when I say this "I have very little patience - period!" But I really don't mind making petit fours at all - I can whip out four dozen in a little over an hour. I have an order for those 4 dozen for this weekend - I'll make the little flowers for them tonight and just pop them on while the icing is still damp.

You have to work with frozen cake and work quickly. And with the poured fondant you are not going to cover every bit of the cake - if you start trying to do that - then you are screwed and will end up with 'crumby' icing. I put them in the mini cupcake liners to look nice and my customers love them!

I'm sorry they didn't work out for you - and especially since you were wanting them for such a sincere occasion.

Suze




Suze, do you fill yours? I make a layer of almond paste and a layer of fruit gel and sandwich them between the cake layers. I don't use poured fondant for frosting, but have a incredible poured frosting I learned of years ago. It appears almost translucent and the pastels are incredible.

The problem with petit fours is that if you don't do them on a regular basis, you get out of the rhythm of making them. I made some back during one of the hottest periods of summer and wanted to chuck them as far as I could throw them. They were NOT a successful batch. pterrell, I feel your pain!

costumeczar Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:30pm
post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s

I charge $684948204957239 per petit four. I'd be happy to make some for you.




Yeah, well, I charge $684948204957239.01, so I think you're undercharging for those!

stampinron Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 7:33pm
post #22 of 33

What type of cake works best? Box mix, pound cake? just wondering.

btw, I tried microwaving a crusting bc before to pour, Yuck! didn't work for me, but it was shortening based, not butter based recipe. Perhaps that is why.

Suzycakes Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 8:37pm
post #23 of 33

Win - when I started testing recipes 4 years ago at the beginning of my cake decorating venture - I would take test samples to friends, meetings, bunco group, to the kitchen committee members of my Church, etc to taste and give me their opinion. While I was raised that petit fours must have a layer fruit filling on top - noone and I mean noone liked it. They all wanted (& still want) just cake and icing. I do put a thick layer of buttercream on top of the cake and freeze along with it and that helps 'cover' the top of the cake with the poured fondant.

As far as cake goes - after all the testing - the hands down winner was the BettyC pound cake mix with milk (not water) and almond flavoring. It bakes easy, freezes easy and cuts like a dream.

My poured fondant recipe is here on CC - if you can find it in the recipe section icon_confused.gif .

Suze

prterrell Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 9:01pm
post #24 of 33

Okay, well that answers one thing then. The first two dozen did rather well cause they were still cold from being in the fridge all night. It was the 2nd batch that started falling apart on me. And then I made the mistake of trying to "touch up" the first batch.

suzycakes do you glaze them in the little wrappers or glaze them and then put them in the wrappers? A lot of mine would fall over after I tried to put them back on the cooling rack (was doing the ladle the coating on the petit four whilst holding the little bugger over the pot of coating on a fork and then transfering back to the rack using a 2nd fork). Of course then the ones that fell over looked a mess.

klat7292 Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 9:27pm
post #25 of 33

prterrell....I took a petit four class a while back and I can tell you this...the cooling rack makes a difference too!! U want to get the ones that have small (tight) holes in them, so that way the cakes are less likely to 'fall over' once you have glazed them and they are drying. After my class, I made a trial batch and I didn't have much success due to not having the correct cooling racks...but they were yummy! icon_lol.gif

And I agree with suzycakes...you MUST use FROZEN cake...much, much better!! thumbs_up.gif

Good Luck and now y'all got me thinking about trying another batch!! icon_wink.gif We'll see!

Suzycakes Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 12:03pm
post #26 of 33

I'm sorry I haven't checked the thread -- was working on 3 cakes last night!

I glaze them on the rack - the rack that makes the little squares - and I put the glaze in a 32oz styrofoam cup and then making a little 'spout' with the cup I go around the sides of the cake first then I pour a small amount on top. I try to check each cake as I ice - because like I said - you don't want to go back and touch them up. Then when I finish the first rack I place the decoration on top. So by the time I finish the 2nd rack - the 1st rack is usually dry enough for me to use an offset spatula to pick them up and place them in the mini-cups.

But the cake must be frozen with the buttercream on top and frozen too. I start the poured fondant in the double boiler setup before I remove the cake from the freezer, then slice with a ruler and a bread knife and then I set the squares on the racks, by then the glaze is ready to pour.

Suze

Loucinda Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 1:36pm
post #27 of 33

If you spray your racks with "PAM" first, they come off much easier too. (the icing doesn't stick as much to the rack)

I still hate them.

-K8memphis Posted 23 Oct 2009 , 2:07pm
post #28 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlecake

join the club...we need t shirts.




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Suzycakes Posted 24 Oct 2009 , 11:06pm
post #29 of 33
Quote:
Quote:

If you spray your racks with "PAM" first, they come off much easier too. (the icing doesn't stick as much to the rack)





This is the "TIP OF THE WEEK" friends! I sprayed the rack and the drip sheet pans and the icing came out of the pan like a dream. Plus I didn't start the petit fours until 2:45 AM and finished at 3:15 AM and hit the sack. At 1:00 p.m. this afternoon I started taking them off the rack to put in the liners and they came off so super easy - none of the icing stuck to the rack. Usually when they dry even 15 minutes too long the icing sticks and takes off a complete side with it! Thanks so much Loucinda - I will always spray the rack and pan from now on!!

Suze

akgirl10 Posted 25 Oct 2009 , 5:38am
post #30 of 33

I've always wanted to try petit fours. How exactly do you pour the icing on the sides, do you tip the rack the cakes are on?

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