Restaurant Wants My Cakes- Now What?

Business By jenmat Updated 22 Oct 2009 , 5:23am by CakeDiva73

jenmat Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 1:41am
post #1 of 12

I have a local restaurant wanting to serve my cakes. How do you usually handle pricing? The restaurant isn't a steakhouse or anything- just a local joint everyone goes to for a cup of coffee, or breakfast on Sunday morning. How much do you reduce the price when you don't decorate the cakes, just ice them?
Anything else I should know?

11 replies
Sweet_Guys Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 1:45am
post #2 of 12

Charge them whatever your base price is. Why mark it down?

Paul

alene Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 2:05am
post #3 of 12

A little local Restaurant wanted me to make cakes for them but they didn't want to give hardly anything for them! When we couldn't come to any agreement, she had the nurve to ask me for my chocolate cake recipe!!!

jenmat Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 2:12am
post #4 of 12

Yikes! That's kind of rude!
This lady does a lot of catering in the area, so she has sent customers my way in the past. Last weekend she actually got to sample the cake, and now wants to serve them. I'm just not sure what to charge her! I do think it would be appropriate to go lower than my decorated price- not much lower, but still..

LaBellaFlor Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 2:13am
post #5 of 12

You don't reduce. All the restaurant is gonna do, is sell your cakes by the serving at a mutch better price then you sold the cake for.

FromScratch Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 2:17am
post #6 of 12

If I'm not going to decorate a cake... I'd reduce the price a bit. I mean my cakes are priced to include some decorating. If I am not going to add fondant and decorate it then it takes less time therefor there is wiggle room in the price. Now I'm not saying drastically, but I charge $3.50 a serving for kitchen cakes and I'd think of undecorated cakes for a diner much the same way. I charge $5/serving for a wedding cake so $3.50 is a pretty decent markdown. Make sure you are still making good money for your time though. No selling them for $1/serving. icon_smile.gif

HarleyDee Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:05am
post #7 of 12

I wouldn't reduce by much, because they are going to buy from you, then turn around and raise their price. Think about how much you need to get out of the cake, how much you want to get out of the cake, and then go from there.

jenmat Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:38am
post #8 of 12

Thanks- I am going to find out how much she charges for other desserts so I know my ballpark and then price it accordingly so we are both making money! I'm glad I didn't quote her too low!

SucreSucre Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:41am
post #9 of 12

Dont sell your self short!!!!!!! I once worked at a bakery that sold cakes to a local country club, and we only cut the price 15% (about $5 cheaper per cake) just because they had a contract, and ordered in bulk. They agreed to this because they would still make over 100% profit. Thats a great profit margin when all they have to do is slice and plate it up. Just think, if your cake is a 9" and serves 12 with traditional wedge shaped servings, how much $ the restaurant will make. The going rate in my area is $6-$8 a slice. 12 slices x $6-$8 per slice = $72-$96 per cake.
So charge accordingly, if you're any thing like me,
icon_lol.gif CAKING GIVES ME THRILLS, BUT IT HAS TO PAY THE BILLS!!!!! icon_lol.gif

LaBellaFlor Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:45am
post #10 of 12

Okay, that's my new mantra!

"Caking gives me thrills, but it has to pay the bills!"

Sucresucre thumbs_up.gif

SucreSucre Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 4:54am
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

Okay, that's my new mantra!

"Caking gives me thrills, but it has to pay the bills!"

Sucresucre thumbs_up.gif




Hey, it works for me, I live by it! icon_biggrin.gif

CakeDiva73 Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 5:23am
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

Okay, that's my new mantra!

"Caking gives me thrills, but it has to pay the bills!"

Sucresucre thumbs_up.gif





lmao! I LOVE it! icon_smile.gif

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