Nfsc Question

Baking By jhuntl01 Updated 21 Oct 2009 , 4:09am by andpotts

jhuntl01 Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 2:40pm
post #1 of 7

I have never made the NFSC before and wanted to make a batch today to "test" them out. I was wondering, the recipe doesn't say if the butter neds to be cold or room temperature. Does anyone know for sure?

Also what is the preference as far as cookie cutters go? Do you like the metal or plastic and why. I have a set of 101 Wilton cutters but they are plastic and I'm curious if they will work ok.

6 replies
luminajd Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 2:54pm
post #2 of 7

I used this recipe for the first time yesterday and am in love. Note that I had planned on making a 1/2 batch but found in searches people who had done 1/2 batches had problems. So I did a full batch and followed the tutorial on this site for cookies and am in LOVE
Anyway, I had read to always use room temp butter when you need to cream because cold butter wont give the creaming step the air it needs if the butter is cold.
I have used both plastic and metal cutters and as long as they are floured, both work well for me. I have read posts that people use the 101 set without problems

elizabeth-jane Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 3:37pm
post #3 of 7

I've only made NFSC three or four times, but I work for a baked goods company and I know that room temperature is almost always ideal for recipes. The few times I've made NFSC I've let the butter soften to room temperature. And they've all been half-batches and I haven't had any problems with it.

Slightly OT, though: I made NFSC the first time using a cup of Blue Bonnet Margarine because that's all we had and they were AMAZING. Used real butter the second time and I wasn't very fond of them. They were fluffier with the margarine, but still sturdy. icon_confused.gif

miezimau Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 4:33pm
post #4 of 7

I also have used margarine instead of the Butter and liked the way they tasted much better than with the Butter.
When I tried it the first time I had the Butter and all other ingredients at room temperature and the cookies came out fine.

badkitty Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 4:59pm
post #5 of 7

I let the butter come to room temp and have made mostly half batches...never had a problem. I've used both plastic and metal cutters with good results as long as I flour or cornstarch them. Love this recipe!

ButtacreamRose Posted 21 Oct 2009 , 2:04am
post #6 of 7

Ditto.... Do the same way badkitty does and have never had a problem.

andpotts Posted 21 Oct 2009 , 4:09am
post #7 of 7

Always room temp butter, as stated earlier it's the only way for it to mix and react properly. I use the 101 and tons of other cutters with no issue, plastic just doesn't cut detail as cleanly, but still work fine.

The NFSC come out great for me everytime, the recipe says to chill the dough and then carry on w/ rolling etc, but just wanted to share how I roll and chill. Someone here explained this to me and it works like a charm and also makes the whole process so much easier IMO. Working with chilled dough (rolling it) can be quite a pain. Hope this helps someone else too;
The perfect method that works for me and makes my cookie making so easy now:
Make my NFSC dough in the KA

Take a large handfull of dough and roll it out between 2 sheets of parchment paper on my doboard (or whatever you use to get even height), move to my refrigerator to chill.

Repeat until all dough is rolled out between sheets of parchment, (I'll usually have a stack of about 8 sheets of rolled dough from 1 batch)

By the time I'm done rolling the last sheet the first is ready to come out, perfectly chilled, ready to cut and bake.

Cut and place on parchment covered cookie sheet.

If the cutting takes a little longer I just pop the sheet with cut outs back in the frige until I'm ready to put them in the oven, no spreading, no problem!

Just make sure you rotate your sheets so you are putting your next set on cooled cookie sheets

Doing it this way you never have to add extra flour to avoid sticking, therefore your cookies don't come out tough and you're rolling soft dough so it's much easier.

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