Fondant Circles

Decorating By justbyangela Updated 22 Oct 2009 , 12:15am by CakeMommyTX

justbyangela Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 2:26pm
post #1 of 10

I am doing fondant circles and fondant stripes on my butter cream layers. How exactly should I go about doing this. Should I do the cut outs and let them sit out? If so, for how long. Also, are they going to stick on without having any type of adhesive?

9 replies
bashini Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 3:27pm
post #2 of 10

Hi, I would cut them out when I'm ready to decorate the cake. A little bit of water will stick the fondant on bc. icon_smile.gif

Rylan Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 4:01pm
post #3 of 10

If it is a round cake, it is best to attach them right after you cut it out. If you are using a square cake, you can definitely attach them later on.

CakeMommyTX Posted 20 Oct 2009 , 4:26pm
post #4 of 10

I let them sit for a little while to harden just a bit so they don't lose their shape when you pick them up, just don't let them dry too much or they will crack when you try to form them to the sides of a round cake.
Sinces it's buttercream the fondant should stick without anything used, I only use fondant glue when attaching fondant 2 fondant.

justbyangela Posted 21 Oct 2009 , 2:34pm
post #5 of 10

Thanks! Also, does the cake have to be completely dry before applying fondant? Meaning does the icing have to be crusted in order to apply it? I tried putting some fondant circles on a cake last night and it seemed as though they kept sliding down. Maybe because the icing was too wet? They weren't thick circles...

CakeMommyTX Posted 21 Oct 2009 , 2:49pm
post #6 of 10

Whenever I add fondant accents to a bc cake I chill it until the bc is hard that way when I put the fondant on I don't put any finger marks or indents in the bc. Also when you take it out of the fridge the bc will gather some condensation and it's just the right amount of moisture to attach fondant pieces to, that's why I never have to use any water or so on when doing fondant on bc.
And having the bc hard and cold should eliminate the sliding factor.
HTH.

justbyangela Posted 21 Oct 2009 , 2:53pm
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

Whenever I add fondant accents to a bc cake I chill it until the bc is hard that way when I put the fondant on I don't put any finger marks or indents in the bc. Also when you take it out of the fridge the bc will gather some condensation and it's just the right amount of moisture to attach fondant pieces to, that's why I never have to use any water or so on when doing fondant on bc.
And having the bc hard and cold should eliminate the sliding factor.
HTH.




Yes, that helps a lot! Thanks. How long do you normally leave it in the refrigerator. Also I have been having some trouble with the smoothing using Viva Paper Towels.. Do you do that? Do I need to wait until it's completely crusted and absolutely no wet spots?

CakeMommyTX Posted 21 Oct 2009 , 3:03pm
post #8 of 10

I use the Melvira Method, there's a tutorial here on CC for it. It's is awesome and I would'nt be able to make cakes with out this method. You should really check it out.
But I'm pretty sure with the Viva method you have to wiat until it's crusted with no wet spots, or the paper towel will stick to the wet spots.
A hour should be long enough but I ice on day and decorate the next so mine are always in the fridge overnight.
Chilling them before you stack also helps with finger prints and smudges. Basically once the bc is on the cake I only work with the cake once it is chilled hard, I'm too much of a clutz to be trusted around warm butter cream!

justbyangela Posted 21 Oct 2009 , 3:06pm
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeMommyTX

I use the Melvira Method, there's a tutorial here on CC for it. It's is awesome and I would'nt be able to make cakes with out this method. You should really check it out.
But I'm pretty sure with the Viva method you have to wiat until it's crusted with no wet spots, or the paper towel will stick to the wet spots.
A hour should be long enough but I ice on day and decorate the next so mine are always in the fridge overnight.
Chilling them before you stack also helps with finger prints and smudges. Basically once the bc is on the cake I only work with the cake once it is chilled hard, I'm too much of a clutz to be trusted around warm butter cream!




Yeah, that makes sense!! Thanks for all of your help. I am so new to this I feel like I'm asking some pretty off-the-wall questions!! Yeah I took a look at the Melvira Method and I'm not sure what type of roller that is exactly? Like a painting roller?? Or is it a roller made specifically for cakes? icon_smile.gif

CakeMommyTX Posted 22 Oct 2009 , 12:15am
post #10 of 10

Yes it is a paint roller, a high density foam roller, I just bought some today at Walmart but any hardware or paint store should sell them also. The are'nt big like a normal roller.
The ones I got today are Shur-Line , there are white and the foam is really smooth, if you get the normal kind then it will texture your butter cream.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/ProductDisplay?partNumber=03076219000P&storeId=10153&sName=Paint+Brushes%2c+Rollers+&psid=YAHOOSHOP01&vName=Tools&cName=Painting&catalogId=12605&sid=IDx20070921x00003b

Here's a link to some from Sears, they are kinda high though I only paid 3$ something at Walmart.

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