dshlent Posted 18 Oct 2009 , 10:10pm
post #1 of

What am I doing wrong???? After I set up my wedding cakes the last 2 have started forming "air pockets". Luckily enough I was there to stick a toothpick in them and the air pockets went away but later comes back!!!! What can I do to prevent this from happening again!!!!?????

Please help!! If I can't figure this out I don't know if I want to do too many more wedding cake because I'm scared that once I leave the icing is going to fall off from these air pockets

15 replies
cabecakes Posted 18 Oct 2009 , 11:36pm
post #2 of

are you using icing or fondant

cabecakes Posted 18 Oct 2009 , 11:38pm
post #3 of

i don't know that i have ever heard of icing getting air bubbles, fondant does

rvercher23 Posted 18 Oct 2009 , 11:48pm
post #4 of

How long do you let your cakes settle before icing them? If you don't wait long enough, when you ice your cakes, they will settle with the icing on it and big airpockets will come out of your cake. I have had this happen several times before.

Horselady Posted 18 Oct 2009 , 11:49pm
post #5 of

BC has "blowouts". Some say it is from air/gas in cake, some say from frosting a frozen cake, some say it has to do with icing consistency. So I don't really know why it does it. I find it happens more when I use my icing too thin a consistency, I always ice cakes frozen and this rarely happens to me.

Wish I could help more than this, but you now know what I know about blowouts which isn't much!

dshlent Posted 19 Oct 2009 , 12:54am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabecakes

are you using icing or fondant




I use buttercream icing...

dshlent Posted 19 Oct 2009 , 12:56am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by rvercher23

How long do you let your cakes settle before icing them? If you don't wait long enough, when you ice your cakes, they will settle with the icing on it and big airpockets will come out of your cake. I have had this happen several times before.




I stack them one night and then ice them the next...

Deb_ Posted 19 Oct 2009 , 2:59am
post #8 of

My experience with blowouts is they only happen when I've frozen/defrosted and then iced the cake.

So for me I avoid freezing and I don't have this problem anymore.

I know others swear by freezing, but it just causes more headaches for me and my particular recipes.

I really think MY blowouts happened because the surface of the cake was more "wet" from going through the defrosting process causing my buttercream to not adhere properly.

Do you freeze or refrigerate your cake layers prior to icing?

dshlent Posted 19 Oct 2009 , 11:25am
post #9 of

HUM....I do freeze and refrigerate. I usually freeze and then let defrost over night and then after I stack I put them in the refrigerator. If you have a lot of cake, which I had 8, how do you store them before you tort them? Or are you able to bake all in one day? I work outside the house so I work on cakes in the evenings.

Deb_ Posted 19 Oct 2009 , 12:20pm

I work from home too but I do have a separate business kitchen with 2 ovens....I have another fulltime business so I limit my cake orders.


I know some people ice their layers frozen and that's great that they don't have any issues, but for me the cake has to be room temperature and dry in order to avoid blowouts or other issues with my buttercream.

I don't refrigerate at all since I am not allowed to sell perishable goods anyway, I don't have to.

-K8memphis Posted 19 Oct 2009 , 1:05pm

Two bakeries I've worked for have had a continual problem with this issue.

We've never been able to find a common denominator for this happening. We've tried zillions of combinations to try & see what causes it.

All we learned was that no way we tried of handling the cake could prevent the bubbles from occuring. Freezing not freezing etc etc etc. But that leaving a hole in the icing through to the cake in each layer was a great deterent--the hole has to be kept open all the way through delivery--if it closed a bubble could ensue.

We made it a small hole--up the 'back' of the cake as hidden as we could place it within the decor.

We'd churn out as many as 20 wedding cakes a week during the high season--not a huge huge bakery but still we moved the product and kept the bubbles away.

Thoughts of the bubbley for yah.

Kerry_Kake Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 11:50am

This is happening to me also!!! It's really annoying!! I'll get my buttercream so smooth with the viva and it will look like fondant then I get the air bubbles and it ruins it because my buttercream crusts. I let the air out with a needle and push the frosting back and then I'm left with a bunch of cracks icon_mad.gif
I just did another cake last night. I baked it and put it in the freezer for a few hours and frosted when chilled (not froze!). Woke up this morning to one air bubble. Not as bad as my last cake....it was full of these air bubbles and like you say, I let the air out and push it back and they just kept coming back! Screeeeeeeemmm!!!
Uh, I wonder if this happens because I chilled it before it cooled down on the counter???? But what's the difference cooling down on the counter or cooling in the freezer?
I'm just really really icon_evil.gif

-K8memphis Posted 28 Oct 2009 , 2:31pm

I don't know for sure how/why they form but pricking each layer through to the cake in advance on purpose helps to prevent them in my cakes and in the bakeries I've worked in--that's what's done as a precaution.
Works/worked well for me/us.

terrijproductions Posted 29 Oct 2009 , 5:37pm

I haven't had an issue with air bubbles in buttercream but have with fondant. How do you prevent that?

hollyscakes Posted 6 Nov 2009 , 7:08am

this is my exact problem!! i let cakes cool to room temp on the counter, crumb coat and refridgerate overnight. then i frost them and decorate and never fails there's the air bubble! i have never had multiple air bubbles on one cake but one is enough! this is getting so annoying! icon_sad.gif

-K8memphis Posted 6 Nov 2009 , 2:08pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by K8memphis-

I don't know for sure how/why they form but pricking each layer through to the cake in advance on purpose helps to prevent them in my cakes and in the bakeries I've worked in--that's what's done as a precaution.
Works/worked well for me/us.


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