Lots Of Questions, Never Done This Before...please Help?

Decorating By keflyn Updated 17 Oct 2009 , 4:09pm by ShelleyMJ

keflyn Posted 16 Oct 2009 , 11:28pm
post #1 of 5

first post, call me kef! icon_cool.gif my questions in order of importance to me:

what kind of cake do I use to put fondant on? I don't want it to crumble under the weight.

when you say chill the cake before torting, do you put it in the fridge or freezer, how do you store it, and for how long?

how do dowel rods work? how do I know what to do with them?

I think I understand how fondant works, (just made a batch and have been playing with it all week ^.^ (i'm making ghost covered cupcakes for a halloween party)) but I'm also making my grandparent's anniversary cake, and a baby's first birthday cake, and I don't want either to look bad, or crumble, or crash......but my fondant which was unsticky is now incredibly sticky, do I just need to add more powdered sugar?

is it okay if I roll out my fondant on parchment paper like pie crust or should I spring for the wilton roller mat?

....also, anyone else think that fondant tastes vaguely similar to those wondrous candy pumpkins?

thank you all!

4 replies
Texas_Rose Posted 16 Oct 2009 , 11:57pm
post #2 of 5

Hi Kef! Welcome icon_biggrin.gif

First, you can put fondant on whatever cake you usually make. Sometimes you'll read that you need a really dense, firm cake for it, but back before I knew better icon_razz.gif I used to put it on cake mix cakes and it worked fine. Now, I like to use the WASC recipe that starts with a cake mix. You can find it in the recipes section on the forum.

Second, I never chill before torting, just cool it all the way.

Third, dowels are used for tiered cakes. They support the upper tiers. Picture them as table legs and the cake board the upper tier is sitting on is the table top.

When fondant is sticky, dust it with cornstarch, or if it's easier for you, grease your hands with a little crisco before working with it.

Instead of buying that Wilton mat, buy a sheet of thick clear vinyl from the fabric store. It costs about three dollars a yard, and one yard is enough to make two good-sized mats. Nothing sticks to it. It's better than the silicone mats that I have.

And last, if you're making your own fondant, you can flavor it any way you want icon_biggrin.gif

Rylan Posted 17 Oct 2009 , 12:17am
post #3 of 5

Hi Kef! Welcome to Cake Central!

Here are my answers to your question:

what kind of cake do I use to put fondant on? I don't want it to crumble under the weight
I'm not familiar with all the recipes out there so I can't really tell you what you can't use. In my opinion, as long as it keeps it's shape, then it is all good. Many people use straight from the cake box mix and as well all know, most of them are very light and fluffy. You will need a reliable support system to avoid sinking.

when you say chill the cake before torting, do you put it in the fridge or freezer, how do you store it, and for how long?
-I don't chill my cake before torting but it usually happens because I usually make the cakes ahead of time (I usually store it in the freezer. This isn't really a necessary step.

how do dowel rods work? how do I know what to do with them?
-You will be using dowels for support. There are many different ways to support a cake. Texas_rose explained it very well.

I think I understand how fondant works, (just made a batch and have been playing with it all week ^.^ (i'm making ghost covered cupcakes for a halloween party)) but I'm also making my grandparent's anniversary cake, and a baby's first birthday cake, and I don't want either to look bad, or crumble, or crash......but my fondant which was unsticky is now incredibly sticky, do I just need to add more powdered sugar?
-Just like Texas_rose said.

is it okay if I roll out my fondant on parchment paper like pie crust or should I spring for the wilton roller mat?
-I guess it would be ok. I usually roll mines on my silicone mat--but a nice flat counter works.

Good luck Kef!
....also, anyone else think that fondant tastes vaguely similar to those wondrous candy pumpkins?

thank you all

keflyn Posted 17 Oct 2009 , 4:02pm
post #4 of 5

thank you all, this cleared some things up

ShelleyMJ Posted 17 Oct 2009 , 4:09pm
post #5 of 5

I'm pretty new at this too. The people that have responded are of the best..... I just wanted to say.... Welcome!

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