For Those Who Refrigerate Cakes

Decorating By cylstrial Updated 10 Oct 2009 , 1:52am by Jeff_Arnett

cylstrial Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:16pm
post #1 of 20

Hello -

For those of you who refrigerate cakes - do you just put it in the fridge? Or do you cover it with saran wrap and then fridge it?

I'm just thinking about the condensation when it comes out. And wondering if saran wrapping it will help.

Thanks!

19 replies
tootie0809 Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:28pm
post #2 of 20

If it's covered in fondant, I don't wrap it. If it hasn't been iced yet, say just filled and crumb coated, then sometimes I do cover it. It really depends on how long I plan on leaving it in the fridge. If its just a couple hours, I usually don't cover it regardless, but if it's overnight, then I do cover it if it hasn't already been covered in fondant.

tx_cupcake Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:29pm
post #3 of 20

For a fully decorated cake, I just pop 'em in the fridge as-is. No saran wrap. When you take the cake out, there will most likely be some condensation, but if you just leave it alone and allow it to come to room temp the condensation will evaporate without incident. In my experience, this goes for buttercream as well as fondant.

HTH! thumbs_up.gif

peg818 Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:29pm
post #4 of 20

uniced cakes are wrapped in plastic wrap, iced cakes are just placed in the fridge with no covering. The are placed in a fridge that holds nothing but cake and unopened drinks.

__Jamie__ Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:33pm
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by peg818

uniced cakes are wrapped in plastic wrap, iced cakes are just placed in the fridge with no covering. The are placed in a fridge that holds nothing but cake and unopened drinks.




Yep. And a big ole box of baking soda. icon_smile.gif

auntginn Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:36pm
post #6 of 20

Most of my cakes are placed uncovered, except for those covered in fondant. Those I took the advice of this site. Place cake in box and wrap with plastic wrap. Day of decorating or event, remove from the refridgerator and allow to come to room temp. It has always worked for me.

cylstrial Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:42pm
post #7 of 20

Sorry - I should have said that it was a fondant covered cake. I guess I thought that I put that in here, but apparently it was in my brain.

So yes, the cake is fondant. I've never put one in the fridge before. The only thing in the fridge is baking soda and drinks that are unopened. I had to move the shelves around and stuff but it's fine.

Thanks for your help!

cylstrial Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:44pm
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by auntginn

Most of my cakes are placed uncovered, except for those covered in fondant. Those I took the advice of this site. Place cake in box and wrap with plastic wrap. Day of decorating or event, remove from the refridgerator and allow to come to room temp. It has always worked for me.




Did you get condensation on your cake? Or does help to stop the condensation from occurring?

Rose_N_Crantz Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:57pm
post #9 of 20

You can't stop the condensation, you just have to let it air dry. DO NOT TOUCHY THE CAKEY while it's drying. Some people sit it in front of a fan.

sophie691 Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:57pm
post #10 of 20

So, you can place a cake that has been filled, covered with fondant and decorated in the fridge? Does the fondant get hard?

chefshawna Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 8:04pm
post #11 of 20

Does the condensation leave marks on the fondant after it has dried?

cylstrial Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 8:06pm
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rose_N_Crantz

You can't stop the condensation, you just have to let it air dry. DO NOT TOUCHY THE CAKEY while it's drying. Some people sit it in front of a fan.




Thanks Rose! I'll put it near a fan to help it dry faster.

Rylan Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 8:23pm
post #13 of 20

I always refrigerate my cakes coverd in plastic wrap but that is only because I never had an issue with condensation.

I've heard many people having problems with sweating, so to be safe, I suggest you don't cover it because if ever you get condensation while the cake is inside the fridge, the moisture will be trapped inside the plastic wrap and eventually damage your cake.

sophie691 Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 8:42pm
post #14 of 20

But will the fondant get hard??

Win Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 8:58pm
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sophie691

But will the fondant get hard??




Not sure what you mean by "hard" because I've never thought of fondant as "soft." But do you mean will it change the texture of it, then the answer is no.

For those who asked about the cake in the box... the cardboard absorbs much of the condensation as the cake comes back up to room temp.

For those who asked about whether the condensation leaves marks, no if you follow the advice of above poster: NO TOUCHY THE CAKEY.

It does take quite some time to come back up to room temp. Bring the cake out at least four hours in advance. It will go through a few stages:

*a glimmer of moisture on the surface
* sweating
*shininess
*back into a satin/eggshell shine
*finally back to it's original matte (if that's was what your original went into the fridge looking like)

That's the cycle of back-to-room-temp on a fondant covered cake.

It's fine if you don't panic and just let it do its thing.
icon_biggrin.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 9:00pm
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Win

Quote:
Originally Posted by sophie691

But will the fondant get hard??



Not sure what you mean by "hard" because I've never thought of fondant as "soft." But do you mean will it change the texture of it, then the answer is no.

For those who asked about the cake in the box... the cardboard absorbs much of the condensation as the cake comes back up to room temp.

For those who asked about whether the condensation leaves marks, no if you follow the advice of above poster: NO TOUCHY THE CAKEY.

It does take quite some time to come back up to room temp. Bring the cake out at least four hours in advance. It will go through a few stages:

*a glimmer of moisture on the surface
* sweating
*shininess
*back into a satin/eggshell shine
*finally back to it's original matte (if that's was what your original went into the fridge looking like)

That's the cycle of back-to-room-temp on a fondant covered cake.

It's fine if you don't panic and just let it do its thing.
icon_biggrin.gif





Beautiful explanation!

cylstrial Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 10:37pm
post #17 of 20

Thanks Win!!

Rylan Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 11:47pm
post #18 of 20

Win is such a kind person to give us a detailed information.

SugarFiend Posted 10 Oct 2009 , 12:05am
post #19 of 20

Oooh, THANK YOU, Win! icon_smile.gif

Jeff_Arnett Posted 10 Oct 2009 , 1:52am
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by cylstrial

Hello -

For those of you who refrigerate cakes - do you just put it in the fridge? Or do you cover it with saran wrap and then fridge it?

I'm just thinking about the condensation when it comes out. And wondering if saran wrapping it will help.

Thanks!


I never cover mine.

If you visit www.facebook.com/rbicakes and go to the photos, then to the "our work" section, Ron Ben-Israel just posted a pix of his walk-in full of cakes....nothing covered in there!

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