Aggravated, Ticked Off, What Do U Guys Think?

Lounge By Malakin Updated 9 Oct 2009 , 9:18pm by -K8memphis

Malakin Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 11:38am
post #1 of 31

My daughter is a stay at home mom, so I figured she might like to start caking cause she is soooo creative and artistic and has a one year old to make birthday cakes for now. So, signed her up for Wilton's class at local place. She loves the class, loves doing cakes.....BUT, she refuses to go back now......
Says her teacher never comments on her work, never helps her, (there are 15 ppl in class), and never shows her the same attention in any way, shape or form that she does the other students.
The other day, to save time, she was putting the striping in the clear disposable bags to do the clown bodies with.
I do remember somewhere in Wilton where they said it probably wouldn't work and you should use the parchment or the other bags, but my daughter said it worked for her and she was happy with what she had done and the results. Her teacher though, didn't single her out by name, but announced to the WHOLE class out loud, that using those types of bags just wasn't right and would not work (while my daughter was doing it).
Now my daughter refuses to continue with the classes. I'm so aggravated and bummed cause she can paint on fondant like nobodys business. It's like a watercolor painting. I told her to say something to explain how she feels to her teacher but she refuses and just doesn't want to go back to class. I slightly po'd now...What do u guys think?

30 replies
Donnagardner Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 11:50am
post #2 of 31

I think she should contact Wilton and speak to her Supervisor about the way this Instructor is treating her students. As a former WMI they push for the student to use ONLY Wilton products but this is not a requirement. I bet they will take care of this problem for her. Good luck.

dynee Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 11:51am
post #3 of 31

It sounds like she lost the Wilton teacher lottery. Some instructors are just plain better than others. How many classes did she have left? If there is more than one instructor in the establishment, maybe she can finish up with a different teacher?

KHalstead Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 11:54am
post #4 of 31

I think the clear bags work fine for striping because that's pretty much all I use is the clear bags and I stripe them anytime I need to and never had a problem. While I don't think the teacher should have singled her out....even if she didn't say look at so and so and how she's doing it, it's not right........she still probably embarassed her. I think you should tell your daughter to put on her big girl panties and finish the class and show up the last day of class with another cake covered in fondant with one of her painting on it and say.........I was just messing around and look what I did!! That'll show her teacher lol

All joking aside though, I've taught a couple classes at our local party store and one class had 15 people and it was soooooooooo hard to make everyone feel a part of it. There are always going to be people that feel left out. If your daughter isn't one to speak up and say, oh wait..I'm not getting it could you show it again......then she may miss out. But coming from someone that's taught the classes, you always do your best to include everyone but you also have to watch the clock and make sure you show all of the techniques that the class outline says you were going to teach!

Tell your daughter not to let the teacher rain on her parade, if she enjoys caking then why should she let this ONE teacher stop her from doing it!?

Texas_Rose Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 11:54am
post #5 of 31

Well...I've never taken the classes because I don't want to make those scary clowns!!!

But I remember reading years ago (back when when I thought the disposable bags were a huge luxury) that you should stripe those so you didn't stain your good bags. So I don't know...if it works for her, I don't know why it would be a big deal. It sounds like your daughter is talented and has some experience already, so maybe the Wilton teacher is intimidated by her or feels like it would seem condescending if she commented on your daughter's work.

Rylan Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 11:57am
post #6 of 31

Some people are just so rude an disrespectful.

If I were her, I wouldn't go back either--I'd rather go to a different place, with a different teacher. I wouldn't ask her to go back to the same place because if she is in an unhealthy environment, her confidence level may go down.

Just help her think positive and keep supporting her.

poohsmomma Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 12:07pm
post #7 of 31

Nothing against Wilton classes; in fact I wish I lived where I could get to them easily. However, I am primarily self- and CC-taught, and your daughter can do that, too. If she is as creative as you say-and if she can paint water color-like on fondant, she is- just turn her loose on CC and she'll be fine.

farmersdaughter4 Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 12:22pm
post #8 of 31

I'm a newbie to cake decorating but understand your daughter's situation. The first course that I took (Michael's) was unpleasant...the instructor talked a lot but about everything under the sun, EXCEPT cake. Sure he eventually gave us some instructions and a short demo, but I felt like I learned more from reading the web and sites like CC forum. For Course two I changed store locations (Hobby Lobby) after hearing rave reviews about the instructor who was teaching there. WHAT A DIFFERENCE!! Love my classes and the instructor...she is personable but keeps on the subject and actually goes beyond the instruction book in teaching. Please show this to your daughter as encouragement to please go to another location and learn from a new instructor. I was viewing Wilton products one day in HL and a few others were there..I just started a conversation asking if they had taken the Wilton course...that's how I learned of the good reviews of the instructor. 15pp is a huge class....a smaller class would be better for her.

3GCakes Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 12:23pm
post #9 of 31

I used to teach and always used the clear bags for striping, even demo'd the technique with the striped bag. However, the parchment bags don't let the color "Wander" like the clear bags can. I don't think the teacher meant to call her out...sometimes I used to joke when my students made a mistake because we could all learn from it.

A class with 15 people, as someone said before is harder, but not impossible to teach. Each teacher is going to handle a struggling student differently though, and the teacher may not even notice that she was struggling.

I agree that your daughter should speak up first to the teacher, or ask her to show it again after the "teaching" part of class when everyone is working on their cakes. In fact, if she's not willing to do that, what else can YOU do? Not much. And I wouldn't be angry about it....the classes just didn't work for her. But it's not your job to fix it...let your daughter speak up for herself.

tripleD Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 12:24pm
post #10 of 31

who needs wilton? I have never taken a class. I am self taught. You learn from your mistakes and you have your own style. I never understand when they say hold the bag this way or that. I am left handed and i write sideways not left to right but top to bottom. I turn whatever i am writing on completly side ways.so I know a teacher would rip on my style.so tell her to keep it up.Keep decorating and enjoy her art.

cutthecake Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 12:26pm
post #11 of 31

My guess is the instructor thought your daughter was doing fine, and didn't need help. And maybe instructor was a bit intimidated by your daughter's talent.
As for the comment, that's just wrong. As we've all learned here on CC, there's more than one way to achieve a result. It's called resourcefulness and creativity.
If the class was held at a Michaels or other store, management should be notified. And Wilton.

CindiM Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 12:33pm
post #12 of 31

A class is about teaching a "process".
Talent is when you understand the process and you take it to a different level and do it your way.
Instrutors are good and bad. But you always learn from the experience.
You can't let another person shape how you feel.

Kitagrl Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 12:46pm
post #13 of 31

I love the clear bags. Hate parchment. haha.

ninatat Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 1:03pm
post #14 of 31

She's so talented tell her to suck it up and don't waste her talent, i know how she feels i'm 55 and the teacher started calling me missy. like what are you doing missy, i took the class with well i guess i can call her my daughter-in-law there getting married today. I e-mailed her and said one more missy and the frosting is going to fly, she wrote back hmmm class should be interesting. well sure enough missy came out and i just said well missy i'm practicing and she never said it again Nicole didn't care for her either she said it was like she repremanding the class, some students liked her i think she had just started teaching and it was the wilton way or nothing, so when the teacher say's something just say well i like to try different things , and in the book it say's parchement papers you can use either and it does show how to load 2 colors in the book, tell her to take a friend along just to watch. i would call to. but tell her not to give up because of someone's rudeness, have her say gezz i didn't think this would be like elementry school. and not sure if she know this but if there's another store she can switch or jump into the class if it's where she is in class, we missed a couple classes and our second teacher at michaels not jo-anns that we can make them up when the next class starts, hope this helps

Jennzoe333 Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 1:11pm
post #15 of 31

I had a bad Wilton class experience as well and never went back after the second class. I came in with my fosted white cake for the 2nd class and the instructor said "wow, your fondant looks great but you were supposed to frost with Wilton's buttercream!" I replied "That is Wilton's buttercream!" and she said "and you were able to get it smooth like that?" Then she proceeded to put her finger slightly into the top of my cake to check if I was telling the truth or not. I thought to myslef "isn't this woman supposed to be teaching this class how to smooth a cake?" No wonder she didn't bother frosting a cake for us the first night! I don't think she knew how to smooth a cake! needless to say, I didn't go back either! I did, however, explain to the class how I used a VIVA to smooth the cake because everyone was commenting on how smooth mine was! A waste of $40 if you ask me!

ninatat Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 1:11pm
post #16 of 31

oh and i've also seen a post where you roll your two colors in saran wrap and place them in parchment or plastic and use it that way, and i've also seen the striping, and just putting both colors in the bag, one of the students in my class made a different cake but used the technique taught in class for the cake,

Malakin Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 2:33pm
post #17 of 31

I am going to show her all the nice things you guys have said. I'm not fighting her battle for her, I just want her to realize not to give up over what someone else says when she has the talent.
She's not one to have to have someone constantly say oh how wonderful. I do think maybe some are intimidated over her talent, but she doesn't try to flaunt it there.
She did go back and finish Wilton Course I. I'm hoping after reading all of this, she finds another store and completes all the rest. I think the main thing was it embarrassed her when the teacher said that in front of everyone even when she was still using Wilton clear plastic bags......Jennzoe333, I'm laughing now....I think me and my daughter both had that problem!!!

doodledo Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 2:44pm
post #18 of 31

I too took a Wilton class. I was the youngest one there (not sure if that had anything to do with it) and I felt so out of place. Lie if you are a newbie going to play bingo for the first time and you sit in one of the ladies "lucky" seats. They treated me like I had leprosy and the instructor wasnt any better. I would not ever take their class again.
From looking at your cakes, I think you should teach her. icon_lol.gif And if you are in my area, let me know and I will leanr with her.

dkltll Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 2:53pm
post #19 of 31

I, too, had a crappy WI experience. My instructer was always late or didn't show up. I live 20 miles from the class. It took 2 months to complete the first course & I never got to complete the class! I just made the last cake myself. I then purchased the kits & here Hobby Lobby sells the student books. I also stumbled upon CC & never looked back. If she is creative & artistic I have no doubt that between you, CC & You Tube she will be able to master the art of caking!

P.S. I also love the platic bags for striping. Parchment bags are great for piping, but give me a headache for anything else.

Good Luck & we all look forward to seeing photos of her cakes.

scionmom Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 3:15pm
post #20 of 31

I have an almost crappy wilton story. I had signed up to take the classes at my local Michaels and noticed the name of the instructor and asked what her last name was. When they told me I was completely shocked that she was doing cakes, because I know her and she only started the classes a little under 2 years ago and have seen her work. Personally (maybe a little snotty.. but oh well), I am not at ALL impressed and it looks worse than mine already do. I immediately told them I didnt want to take the classes from her because I wanted someone who was more experienced and knowledgable. So, now I have gone to Hobby Lobby and start my classes on Monday. Kinda nervous dont know if I need to bring anything, have the kit but dont kno anything else. I am also very nervous that they are going to want me to use the Wilton buttercream, I dont like it at all, and havent used anything but the Buttercream Dream on here for months.

Anyways, tell your daughter that I think it might have been that the instructor was maybe a little intimidated by her natural talent. But I am glad to hear she finished them regardless of the instructor. I look forward to seeing some of her work.

scionmom Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 3:16pm
post #21 of 31

I have an almost crappy wilton story. I had signed up to take the classes at my local Michaels and noticed the name of the instructor and asked what her last name was. When they told me I was completely shocked that she was doing cakes, because I know her and she only started the classes a little under 2 years ago and have seen her work. Personally (maybe a little snotty.. but oh well), I am not at ALL impressed and it looks worse than mine already do. I immediately told them I didnt want to take the classes from her because I wanted someone who was more experienced and knowledgable. So, now I have gone to Hobby Lobby and start my classes on Monday. Kinda nervous dont know if I need to bring anything, have the kit but dont kno anything else. I am also very nervous that they are going to want me to use the Wilton buttercream, I dont like it at all, and havent used anything but the Buttercream Dream on here for months.

Anyways, tell your daughter that I think it might have been that the instructor was maybe a little intimidated by her natural talent. But I am glad to hear she finished them regardless of the instructor. I look forward to seeing some of her work.

ninatat Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 3:42pm
post #22 of 31

yes they need to research their teachers or sit in on a class unannounced, our teacher would say oh that won't work, and it did, everybody adjust's to what works for them. please tell her to go back or if she can jump into another class

grandmom Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 4:39pm
post #23 of 31

I'm with some of the other posters - if she has the knack, and obviously she does, she can learn it by herself. So many of us did.

Now, to the OP, please don't be PO'd at your daughter. She's not happy at that class, and you already know from her teenage years that the more you push, the faster she will back away. Let it go and find another way to engage her in our craft.

ninatat Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 6:09pm
post #24 of 31

good idea, i learned so much from here and u-tube so she should do just fine

indydebi Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 6:20pm
post #25 of 31

You can't stripe the disposable bags? It doesn't work? huh! Good thing I didn't know that for all those times that I've done it that way! icon_eek.gif

I, too, am totally self taught. Not one class ever. It's doable.

Some people mistake an ability to DO a craft with the ability to TEACH a craft. Those are two separate skill levels. Being able to transfer knowledge to other people with brains that work different that yours is a valuable skill and not everyone can do it.

DEBBIE157 Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 6:26pm
post #26 of 31

Although I have not been caking for quite a few months, I did have a WONDERFUL Wilton instructor. She was self-taught. She is as good as any of the "Name Brand" folks I've seen on the internet. She just loves decorating.

Tell your daughter in law:
Hangeth in there...

cathyscakes Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 6:35pm
post #27 of 31

I had a teacher like that. I had been decorating cakes for a while and a friend wanted to learn. She didn't want to go alone so I signed up too. I already knew how to do everything, I was just there for support, it was a beginner class. I don't think the teacher liked it. We were making buttercream roses, and when she saw mine she commented, thats an interesting thing. Not in a nice way. Everyone thought mine looked better than hers. Some people are so threatened, or are not good teachers, its really weird. That comment was made 20 years ago, and I still remember it. Tell your daugher to not let someone do that to her, if she wants to learn, she needs to walk in with her head held high, and just learn. Or find another teacher, its suppose to be fun.

floral1210 Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 6:50pm
post #28 of 31

I am not a strong caker, and am trying to learn on my own. Since I have no native talent at all, I struggle but definitely am learning a lot from everyone on here. I was going to take a Wilton course, but I notice that all of the cakes look alike, and while there is something to be said for learning technique, I really think some people benefit more from trial and error. I think anyone who has a great deal of creativity might be a bit of a threat to someone who "learned the techniques", but lacks the artistic talent. Perhaps that is the problem with the teacher. SOunds like she may be a "black or white" thinker, while your daughter can explore the "grey areas" of how to do something. She would likely do well learning on her own, and not being restricted by a class, particularly a kind of "mass-marketed" type of class. I hope this doesn't offend anyone, and makes sense to your daughter.

TexasSugar Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 7:01pm
post #29 of 31

Okay as a WMI I'll say this, we are just human and we all have different levels of experience. I waited several years after taking the classes before I started teaching but there are some that go right into it after the classes. There are also people that are really talented or naturally talented and there are others that had to work for it.

It would be very hard for Wilton to sit in on all their instructors classes, even just one. There are thousands of them in thousands of cities not only in the US but other places as well. That would be alot of travel time?expense for the Supervisors and would definetly up the cost of something somewhere along the way. That is why, as a WMI I feel if someone has had a bad experince they need to contact the store and Wilton and let them know about it.

When teaching a large number that is alot of people to check how they are doing before moving on to the next thing in the time frame we have. I just got done teaching a class of 14 two months ago. I can say those that pick it up easily got a "great job" from me and those that were struggling with one thing or another did get a little more attention. If someone is making a great shell, then I let them make them, and will help someone that is struggling. I wasn't in the class or know all the situation, I'm just throwing out the possiblity with why someone else got more attention.

Of the class of 14, 12 finished and only 7 went on to the next course. Several of those commented to me this last month about how much they liked the smaller class cause they can get more one on one time with me. I do try to give everyone the same attention and time, but it doesn't always happen that way.

I do remember as I am walking around different things to suggest they do or don't do when I watch or see someone doing something. It could have been that she singled her out or it could have been that she really didn't know she was doing it and said it. Wilton does say that you should use the parchment because the icing color will stay in place better than it does with the plastic and it can stain your parchment bags. It doesn't mean that if you do it another way it is bad or wrong.

As far as teaching only the Wilton way, that is what the classes are all about. Wilton is paying for it, so they can tell us exactly what they want us to teach. It is like a teaching in school having to follow the districts lesson plans. I don't think a teacher should tell a student she is doing something wrong since she isn't doing it the wilton way. I can also say when I have students that come in talking about other products or other ways of doing things it does put me in a difficult situation. It is my job to teach the Wilton way and that is what I do. I will also give my students tips that aren't always Wilton or let them know that this is the Wilton way and not the only way.

If you have a bad exeperince with an instructor report it and try to find another store to take the classes at. Please don't judge all Wilton class or Instructors off of one. Not all of us are bad. icon_smile.gif

cabecakes Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 9:14pm
post #30 of 31

There was a Wilton class offered at our local party supply shop that I was very tempted to take, but after I started going online and studying different techniques and visiting CC I felt it would be a big waste of time. There is no question that I have had that I haven't been able to get answered right here. What a tool! Who needs Wilton when you have the greatest resource possible right at your fingertips. There is no way I could get the information from classes that I get here. My advice, ask for a refund and point your daughter in the direction of CC. It will probably be much more profitable for her. Oh and another thing, a lady I know that owns her own catering business took the went to the wilton academy or whatever it's called to take formal instruction on cake decorating, and she said that she wasn't impressed. She told me that the techniques they taught her, she was already advanced beyond. She is the one that pointed me to this website, god bless her. I will be thankful for that forever.

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