How Do I Substitute Butter For Oil?

Baking By -Tubbs Updated 9 Oct 2009 , 4:08am by -Tubbs

-Tubbs Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 3:45pm
post #1 of 9

I have a request for chocolate cake, from a customer who specifically requested butter as an ingredient. I usually use the Dark Chocolate cake recipe from this site, which uses half a cup of oil and no butter. If I wanted to make the same cake, would I just use half a cup of melted butter instead?

And vice versa, most of my other recipes are butter-based. Could I sub oil for some of the butter?

Thanks for any help!

8 replies
-K8memphis Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 3:53pm
post #2 of 9

Sometimes that works out for other people--it doesn't usually work out for me.

But butter has water in it--kind of a lot nowadays too so if It was me, I'd hold back on some of the liqiud in the recipe and up the butter itself a few tablespoons-ish.

Someone smart will chime in who does it--

Me? I would find a specific recipe that already has butter but...

ebredhawk Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 6:05pm
post #3 of 9

DH makes a chocolate butter cake mix that you could doctor up to your liking. just a recommendation though.. those cakes are VERY moist so if you're doing any kind of stacking with them, make sure you have lots of support in place.

-K8memphis Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 6:54pm
post #4 of 9

Toba's got a chocolate cake with butter~~

Have I b*tched lately about how my husband moved my cake books and I can't find anything anymore? grr

But I imagine all the biggies have butter based choco cakes--Scott Clark Woolley's choco cake is pretty famous--not sure about the butter factor.

Colette's chocolate cake in the Christmas book is made with shortening.

Y'know what though--I'd a never taken the order.

-K8memphis Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 6:57pm
post #5 of 9

Yes Scott's uses butter

Baking 9-1-1 has a chocolate cake using butter.

-Tubbs Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 10:47pm
post #6 of 9

Thanks! I'll think I'll just experiment with subbing half of the oil with butter and maybe reducing the liquids just a bit. It's only an 8" round, so it's not 'specially high risk. I'm sure it will be fine - I just need to be able to look the customer in the eye and tell her there's butter in it!!

Jayde Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 10:50pm
post #7 of 9

You know what I do? If a customer asks for a 'butter' cake, I add in a tbsp of butter flavor and possibly sub some of the water for melted butter. I dont omit the oil though. The oil is what makes it moist, if you sub with butter most of the water evaporates and your cake ends up dry.

indydebi Posted 8 Oct 2009 , 10:57pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayde

You know what I do? If a customer asks for a 'butter' cake, I add in a tbsp of butter flavor and possibly sub some of the water for melted butter. I dont omit the oil though. The oil is what makes it moist, if you sub with butter most of the water evaporates and your cake ends up dry.



I was reading this thread hoping someone more knowledgeable than me would address this. Anytime I've used butter in a cake, it's been brittle and dry. I read on another thread that oil is 'fat" but butter is "milk and water" (simplistically speaking). Jayde, your explanation helps me understand the "why" of my failed cakes!

-Tubbs Posted 9 Oct 2009 , 4:08am
post #9 of 9

Thanks for the extra info. I'll leave all the oil in and trade some of the milk for melted butter. I'll let you know how it turns out - this cake is super-moist, so it wouldn't hurt if it goes a little less so.

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