Ganache Over Buttercream

Decorating By SandiOh Updated 5 Oct 2009 , 8:21am by Rylan

SandiOh Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 8:45pm
post #1 of 6

I want to pour some ganache over some buttercream to get that effect of just dripping down the cake....do you know what I mean?

Is it just two to one chocolate/cream? when do you pour it? how do you keep it from not dripping all the way down the cake?

Any suggestions would be helpful.
TIA
Sandi

5 replies
Rylan Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 9:37pm
post #2 of 6

I just use chocolate thinned with shortening.

Anyways, the key is consistency. Not to thick and not to thin. To get some really nice drippings, you pipe the top edge with chocolate, letting it drip onto the sides. When done, just fill the center. Am I making any sense?

cakenutz Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 9:44pm
post #3 of 6

After I make ganache (!# semi sweet c chips in @ cups hot cream) I let it cool way down but still pourable if your cake is cold it will really run down sides slow HTH

SandiOh Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 10:00pm
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylan

I just use chocolate thinned with shortening.

Anyways, the key is consistency. Not to thick and not to thin. To get some really nice drippings, you pipe the top edge with chocolate, letting it drip onto the sides. When done, just fill the center. Am I making any sense?




I understand. how much chocolate/shortening? would you put the chocolate on a cool cake, then after applying the chocolate place it in the fridge for a few minutes to set?

KitchenKat Posted 4 Oct 2009 , 1:17am
post #5 of 6

I use about 1 cup chocolate to 1 1/4 cups cream - rough proportions. If you want it to keep a sheen even when refrigerated, add about a tsp of light corn syrup. You really can't mess up this one unless you make the ganache too thick. Cool the ganache till it's the consistency of honey. IMPORTANT: Honey consistency will flow all the way to the base of the cake in random drips. If you want a glaze that stops midway down the sides, cool ganache to just a tad thicker than honey.

Cover the cake with BC (I use IMBC or SMBC) and chill really well. This is key. The BC must also be very smooth or any lump or bump will show up and mar the surface.

Put the very cold cake on a cooling rack and place a foil lined baking sheet under the rack. Pour the ganache on the center of the cake's surface. Keep pouring slowly and watch the ganache spread out and drip over the sides.

Rylan - I'm curious. Does chocolate with shortening have a smooth, soft consistency like ganache or a more of a firm coating? The coating is what I get when I mix choco and shortening.

Rylan Posted 5 Oct 2009 , 8:21am
post #6 of 6

SandiOh, I really don't measure the amount of shortening--so I can't really help on that. I hope someone will chime in and give you the ratio. If you want to use ganache, I suggest you pipe the top edges until it drips down and then fill in the center. If it isn't smooth in the center, just use a hot spatula (dipped in water and then wiped off) to smooth it.

KitchenKat, when I make cake truffles, that is what I used to coat them and you can't really tell the difference whether it has shortening or not (once it has hardened). The only difference you will see is the process of coating it because the chocolate will be thinner, giving you a smooth coating. If you will cover a whole cake with chocolate, I'd rather go for ganache because you get more and it is a lot cheaper.

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