Best Way To Make Pumpkin Shape?

Decorating By cakesrock Updated 3 Oct 2009 , 4:37pm by 7yyrt

cakesrock Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 3:57am
post #1 of 15

Can anyone suggest the best way to make a pumpkin shape? I was thinking of using 2 sport ball pans end to end...

In my initial brilliance, I used 2 bundt pans, but that did not work. So I added a round cake in the middle and it still does not look the way I had hoped it would.

Thanks!

14 replies
MrsNancyB1 Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 4:00am
post #2 of 15

I would just use the sports ball pan, and then carve out grooves all around it to give the pumpkin shape.

HTH.

nikki72905 Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 4:03am
post #3 of 15

check out my pictures I just used the ball pan to make a pumpkin cake

7yyrt Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 1:47pm
post #4 of 15

Many do use the ball or bundt pans with success.

Is there a picture of the shape you're trying for? Perhaps that would give us a starting point.

QueenJessica Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 5:46pm
post #5 of 15

I'VE DONE A PUMPKIN CAKE WITH 2 BUNDT CAKES. I USED A BANANA FOR THE STEM. JUST MAKE SURE YOUR BOTTOMS ARE LEVEL. I HAVE A PICTURE IN MY PHOTOS.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 6:42pm
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsNancyB

I would just use the sports ball pan, and then carve out grooves all around it to give the pumpkin shape.

HTH.


I used the sports ball, crumb ice, the roll tubes of fondant and stick on to make the ridges....when the whole thing gets the final layer of fondant it makes a great pumpkin!

cabecakes Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 11:59pm
post #7 of 15

I have heard of using the bundt pans before to make a pumpkin shape by placing the bottoms together, and using a ice cream cone for the stem. I'm assuming though that you want a taller, narrower type pumpkin. I used a stainless steel bowl to make an igloo for a cake once. Only fill the bowls about 1/2 full. I had to bake at 325 degrees with a flower nail what seemed like forever though, but it baked ok. Maybe if you baked two and put the bottoms together. You'd probably have to used some cake board and dowel support though. This is all speculation though, good luck.

MalibuBakinBarbie Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 2:16am
post #8 of 15

This was done with bundt pans (2 cakes). If you decide to give it another try icon_smile.gif :

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo_1079383.html

catlharper Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 2:32am
post #9 of 15

I used two bundt pans to make mine with an icecream cone (flat bottomed) to make a pumpkin. Also, my ornament, I think it's in my gallery here, is also made exactly the same way. Why didn't the bundts work for you?

madgeowens Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 3:56am
post #10 of 15

I think the bundt pan is best because the grooves are already in it perfectly. However I have used a stainless steel bowl and cut them in......I don't think it turned out good since I have no pic haha.I think it was early in my hobby...maybe I will try again this year icon_smile.gif

Makeitmemorable Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 4:35am
post #11 of 15

This sounds crazy but we are not big on halloween here, but can someone tell me what a bundt pan is?

Sweet_Treats_1 Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 5:16am
post #13 of 15

I have used the bundt pan. Just flatten the bottoms and attach with buttercream, then ice and cover with fondant, or I just use orange tinted cream cheese icing. It really does work well becouse U have the grooves from the pan, no carving required HTH and Good Luck

Makeitmemorable Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 7:31am
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

this may help

http://imgtn2.ask.com/ts?t=10895491778809172638&pid=23168&ppid=10




So does that mean they are hollow in the middle the pumpkins?

7yyrt Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 4:37pm
post #15 of 15

Yes. I usually fill them with a little surprise like M&Ms, or small toys.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%