Using Ganache Instead Of Buttercream Questions

Decorating By gloria Updated 2 Oct 2009 , 2:43pm by __Jamie__

gloria Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 3:50am
post #1 of 13

I'm making a cake with fondant that will have a chocolate bavarian cream filling.
I have never used ganache before. A couple questions.

How thick should the ganache be (replacing buttercream crumbcoat)?
Do I still put a buttercream dam for the filling?

Any good suggestions for using ganache as a crumbcoat?

12 replies
Kitagrl Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 4:04am
post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by gloria

I'm making a cake with fondant that will have a chocolate bavarian cream filling.
I have never used ganache before. A couple questions.

How thick should the ganache be (replacing buttercream crumbcoat)?
Do I still put a buttercream dam for the filling?

Any good suggestions for using ganache as a crumbcoat?




You should probably use a nice thick ganache dam....and then just have the ganache cooled to a nice icing texture to ice the cake.

Another thing I've done is make a whipped ganache, that makes a nice icing as well. I think there are recipes somewhere around here for that.

__Jamie__ Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 4:05am
post #3 of 13

Most of us (I think) skip damming and crumbcoating when using ganache. I do anyways. The ganache when set, is quite sturdy and doesn't allow for bulging. But....I'm thinking Bavarian Cream may be a bit too loose and you just may want to dam in this case. You can dam with ganache!


As for crumbcoating, I never do with regular BC and I never do with ganache. Especially since I only do this for fondant covered cakes, I don't get excited over a few crumbs being visible in the icing. Now with a BC only cake, I take care NOT to pull up crumbs that would be visible. Very very picky about that.

sugarandslice Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 4:13am
post #4 of 13

I'd say use a thicker layer that a crumbcoat because once it's fully set you'll want to 'hot knife' it to gt your surface really really smooth so you need a bit extra on there to start with to allow for what you scrape off. Does that make sense?

When I do it, I make my ganache layer about 1cm (1/2") then it usually ends up a little less than that after the hot knife.

HTH
Emma

sugarandslice Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 4:14am
post #5 of 13

Oh, and I don't dam. But then I use ganache as my filling too
icon_smile.gif

gloria Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 4:20am
post #6 of 13

so, since I have the filling already, I will use it on part of the cake because I would like to try it.

But if anyone can give me a good ganache recipe (an easy one please) it would be appreciated. I live in Canada so I will need ingredients that are available here.

P.S. thanks for the info everyone

sugarandslice Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 4:39am
post #7 of 13

For dark choc ganache you need to use a 2:1 ratio (by weight) of chocolate:cream. Eg: 2lbs chocolate 1lb cream

Break the chocolate into small pieces. Put cream in a pan and heat until just boiling. Pour cream over chocolate and stir, stir, stir until it's smooth. If the choc doesn't completely melt put it in the microwave for a few seconds and stir again until it's smooth. Don't use an electric mixer or whisk because it'll put too many air bubbles in your ganache.
Leave it to cool to room temp (I let mine sit out overnight) then it'll be a spreadable consistency.

HTH
Emma

gloria Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 4:44am
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by emcm51

For dark choc ganache you need to use a 2:1 ratio (by weight) of chocolate:cream. Eg: 2lbs chocolate 1lb cream

Break the chocolate into small pieces. Put cream in a pan and heat until just boiling. Pour cream over chocolate and stir, stir, stir until it's smooth. If the choc doesn't completely melt put it in the microwave for a few seconds and stir again until it's smooth. Don't use an electric mixer or whisk because it'll put too many air bubbles in your ganache.
Leave it to cool to room temp (I let mine sit out overnight) then it'll be a spreadable consistency.

HTH
Emma



What kind of cream do you use?

sugarandslice Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 5:54am
post #9 of 13

I'm in Australia and here it's called pure cream. It has no thickeners or gelatin in it. It's also called pouring cream.
HTH icon_smile.gif

my_4_dumplins Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 6:59am
post #10 of 13

The recipe for ganache that I use is this: Chocolate Ganache III by pmw109
Ingredients
1 cup heavy cream
2tbs butter
2tbs sugar
12oz chocolate chips
Instructions
In a sauce pan, combine cream, butter, and sugar. Bring to a boil. Take off heat add the chocolate chips

Dont stir, let sit for 5 minutes.
After 5 minutes pass, stir until smooth.
Maybe foamy from milk. Stir until smooth and glossy.
Let cool or pour on warm.


**I have only made this once and used it on my moms birthday cake (the only one in my photos with ganache) and it turned out great! It was very easy to work with. HTH

__Jamie__ Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 2:22pm
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by my_4_dumplins

The recipe for ganache that I use is this: Chocolate Ganache III by pmw109




The ganache being discussed in this thread is the spreading type, not this poured type.

my_4_dumplins Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 6:31am
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by my_4_dumplins

The recipe for ganache that I use is this: Chocolate Ganache III by pmw109



The ganache being discussed in this thread is the spreading type, not this poured type.


sorry sweety, I didn't know there was a difference. I guess I just assumed it was the same thing because after about an hour when it had completley cooled it was so thick theres no way it could be poured, but it was perfect for spreading. Thank you for the tip thumbs_up.gif

__Jamie__ Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 2:43pm
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by my_4_dumplins

Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by my_4_dumplins

The recipe for ganache that I use is this: Chocolate Ganache III by pmw109



The ganache being discussed in this thread is the spreading type, not this poured type.

sorry sweety, I didn't know there was a difference. I guess I just assumed it was the same thing because after about an hour when it had completley cooled it was so thick theres no way it could be poured, but it was perfect for spreading. Thank you for the tip thumbs_up.gif




No prob. Just seeing all those extra ingredients, especially the butter traditionally used to give the ganache a shiny finish made me think of the pouring type.

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