How Do You Make A Cake A Week Ahead And Keep It Fresh?

Decorating By wyliecakes Updated 1 Oct 2009 , 6:12pm by cakesdivine

wyliecakes Posted 30 Sep 2009 , 3:56am
post #1 of 10

I am needing to make a cake and decorate it with fondant and hold it almost a week before the event. I have to be gone out of town, but have been asked to do a highly decorated cake. I don't want to turn it down, but I want it to hold well and look nice. I've had problems with mmf getting sticky when it is put into the fridge, but don't know any other way to do it. Does anyone have a suggestion?

Thanks!
wyliecakes

9 replies
Rylan Posted 30 Sep 2009 , 7:39am
post #2 of 10

My only suggestion is to freeze it. I really don't have experience with it yet but I do have a test cake in the freezer that I will be opening in 2 weeks (no I will not eat it).

wyliecakes Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 1:37pm
post #3 of 10

Rylan, thank you for getting back to me. That may be an option. I wonder if the fondant will then be sticky once it thaws out? I don't know, I might try it! icon_confused.gif

cakesdivine Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 1:48pm
post #4 of 10

Is the fondant colored in anyway? If so the color will run from the condensation. If it is white or ivory you should be fine. Let it defrost, the fondant will eventually dry on its own Just make sure you have ample time to let it completely defrost & dry before you deliver it. Be forewarned, the fondant might crack during the defrost process if it was rolled too thin.

OH WAIT! you said MMF...Ya know I only use the commercial fondant, not homemade mmf. It might remain sticky, I have no clue! Why don't you do a small cake and cover it then freeze it overnight, take it out and see how it does. That is the only way to be 100% sure that it won't be sticky.

CIApastrychef Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 1:58pm
post #5 of 10

We used to freeze cakes all the time at school.
This is how I do it...
Make sure you give it time to thaw, but it's good if it's still a LITTLE cold, but very firm. Then build your cake, bc coat, and pop in fridge to firm back up. Pull out and cover with fondant. I've had success with this!

However....my buttercream is about 50% butter, no shortening. I can't speak on shortening based buttercream (AKA american buttercream) because i've never used it for anything else other than piping practice buttercream.

HTH

Kristy

YummyChoo Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 2:53pm
post #6 of 10

Do frozen cakes really taste as fresh as the day they were made though? I hear alot of people bake the wedding cakes up to a week before the delivery , so its not all rushed at the end? Has anyone tried this before?

7yyrt Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 5:19pm
post #7 of 10

It sounds like you want to completely bake, decorate, freeze, and then pop it out the day of the event ready to eat?
You could with buttercream, I'm not sure about MMF. That darn stuff condenses like mad.

TitiaM Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 5:32pm
post #8 of 10

Frozen cakes taste just fine--if anything better than fresh IMO-- it evens out the moisture. (I'm one of those the cake tastes better on the third day people.) Although I only have experience with scratch baking so if your using a box cake, I'm not sure if its the same.

CoutureCakeCreations Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 5:50pm
post #9 of 10

I would not suggest freezing a fondant covered cake. When thawing the cake will sweat and if you use colors in the fondant they may bleed and cause a disaster.

cakesdivine Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 6:12pm
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by YummyChoo

Do frozen cakes really taste as fresh as the day they were made though? I hear alot of people bake the wedding cakes up to a week before the delivery , so its not all rushed at the end? Has anyone tried this before?




You're kidding right? Frozen cakes taste better, the freezing add moisture to the cake or any baked goods. Just don't leave it in there for months on end. But a week like the OP is stating is perfectly fine.

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