Is 6" Too Tall?

Decorating By audrey0522 Updated 3 Oct 2009 , 1:13am by sadsmile

audrey0522 Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 9:52pm
post #1 of 11

I am making my daughter's wedding cake it will be 6", 10", 14", and 18" tiers (bottom is a dummy tier) I made each layer 3 inches tall since my pans are 3". They are in the freezer! This will make 6" tiers. (before fondant) The dummy tier will be 5" (before fondant) Is this too tall for the tiers? Will it look out of proportion? I'm not good at cutting the cake level so I was thinking if the tiers would look better at 5", I could trim one layer of each tier to 2 inches instead of trimming 1/2 inch off each layer. If it does not look out of proportion I would like to leave it at 6". I am going to put a ribbon (real) around the bottom of each tier and then a 8mm bead border. I am not sure what size ribbon to use with such a tall cake. I hope the height is not to big for the 8 mm bead. It is the only size bead mold I have and there is no time to order anything else. The 12 mm bead mold looked so large. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Since I am a hobby baker the "client" doesn't really have much of a say in what I give them, so I just do what I think looks best. ( : Any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!!

10 replies
sweetcravings Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 11:56pm
post #2 of 11

I always worry about making a tier too high, simply because something so tall won't fit on an average dessert plate. I've made a tier with two 2" cakes, torted and iced and they probably came pretty close to that 6" mark with all the fillling etc...they just barely fit on the plate. I would probably make it shorter next time by either reducing the layers i torte or just torting one 2".

audrey0522 Posted 30 Sep 2009 , 1:23am
post #3 of 11

I didn't think about fitting on the plate. Something to think about! I don't tort them. I haven't attempted that yet. I have enough trouble getting them level. I cook them a little higher (with a parchment collar) so I can level them with the top of the pan. How do you think the look would be with tall cake tiers (4 tiers) if the plates are big enough? I appreciate your insight!

sweetcravings Posted 1 Oct 2009 , 10:55pm
post #4 of 11

Personally i like it when all the tiers are the same height, but it seems the trend lately is having one or more tiers slightly higher than others. I saw one here on CC not long ago. It is a dramatic look. Sometimes i will stack my cake pans to get an idea how the finished cake will look as far as height..it gives you a visual. Perhaps you can try that.
I think it's a personal preference.
As far as ribbon, i would make sure that it is wide enough so that it doesn't get lost with all that cake. Nothing too thin.

ApplegumKitchen Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 12:39am
post #5 of 11

Double height cakes (6inch) are very popular here in Australia at the moment - as are the multi height cakes.

When we make them - we use a board between the 2 x 3inch layers (even thought they are technically the same size) with skewers underneath etc. then the total 6inches is covered with fondant - when it comes time to cut the cake - a knife is simply run around the fondant at the 3inch mark and the top layer lifted off and cut like a single cake - so you don't have to worry about 6inch height pieces on your cake plate icon_biggrin.gif

audrey0522 Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 1:19am
post #6 of 11

Thank you both! I appreciate the advice. I am always amazed by all the help you can get on CC. I don't know if I could decorate cakes without it.

sweetcravings Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 6:47pm
post #7 of 11

Glad to help. ;0) Best of luck on the cake and congratulations on your daughter getting married..such a fun time. ;0)
Pls post a picture when it's all done.

Suzanne

ApplegumKitchen Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 9:59pm
post #8 of 11

Glad to assist also - been through the daughter getting married last year - FUN time - I loved it !!! No bridezilla's here.

For torting your cakes Audrey - have you tried the "cut in the tin" method.

Its so simple - you will be thinking... "Why didn't I think of that" !

get a couple of your dummies (poly not people! icon_biggrin.gif ) remove the cake from the tin - pop one of your dummies into your tin and then cut cake level with the top of your tin - remove this piece. Add another dummy (to lift up another layer) and cut cake again.

If you have 1inch high dummies it makes it really easy to torte into what ever layers you want - and they are always STRAIGHT!! and EVEN !!

Poor man's AGBAY

Tee-Y Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 10:30pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumKitchen



For torting your cakes Audrey - have you tried the "cut in the tin" method.

Its so simple - you will be thinking... "Why didn't I think of that" !

get a couple of your dummies (poly not people! icon_biggrin.gif ) remove the cake from the tin - pop one of your dummies into your tin and then cut cake level with the top of your tin - remove this piece. Add another dummy (to lift up another layer) and cut cake again.

If you have 1inch high dummies it makes it really easy to torte into what ever layers you want - and they are always STRAIGHT!! and EVEN !!

Poor man's AGBAY




Wow! Applegumkitchen this is wonderful! thumbs_up.gif Thanks for this brief tutorial dealing with one of my biggest problems-levelling. I'm so going to do this with my next cake. icon_biggrin.gif

ApplegumKitchen Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 10:58pm
post #10 of 11

Glad to help - I should add a tip though - when you are removing your layers - have a piece of board/tray (something stable) to "slide" your cake over on to, once it is cut - less chance then of layers breaking icon_biggrin.gif

sadsmile Posted 3 Oct 2009 , 1:13am
post #11 of 11

I've done the poor man's agbay by stacking up several layers of cake circles...LOL Whatever works!

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