Wedding Vs. Party Pieces Pricing

Decorating By mrsclox Updated 29 Sep 2009 , 10:08pm by SugarFrosted

mrsclox Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 12:45am
post #1 of 21

Here's a question for you...I was just looking at some serving and cutting guides. The wedding servings were 1x2x4 and party were 2x2x4. If I'm making a cake that is just a celebration cake (not wedding) should I charge them based on 2x2x4" servings? For example, a 12" round will serve 56 wedding pieces and 28 party pieces. If I'm making a celebration cake at $3.00 a serving, do I charge $168 or $84? I personally think 2x2x4 is too big. Can you tell I'm new at this?

20 replies
jammjenks Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 12:49am
post #2 of 21

I use the wedding chart for every cake I do.

SugarFrosted Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 1:01am
post #3 of 21

You begin with the knowledge that each cake will be X number of wedding size servings. You charge using that number and you tell the client that is how many industry standard servings available in that size cake. You also tell the client if they want bigger servings, then they need to order more cake.

Texas_Rose Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 1:02am
post #4 of 21

Most people follow the wedding chart. Don't describe the serving sizes to your customers as "wedding" or "party", just say that the serving is 1x2x4. Some people will have a block of wood cut to the standard serving size as an example...that way the customer will know if that's the serving size they want, or if they need to order a bigger cake.

I think party cakes are getting a lot fancier than they used to be and it doesn't make sense to charge half as much just because it's going to a party and not a wedding.

costumeczar Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 1:07am
post #5 of 21

I use the 1x2x4 for every cake.

mrsclox Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 1:51am
post #6 of 21

Thanks for your input. I have been charging for a 1x2x4 for every cake, but had never even considered different serving sizes until I looked at that chart. I second guessed myself. I'll just keep doing what I'm doing then. THANKS!

indydebi Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 3:05am
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugarFrosted

You begin with the knowledge that each cake will be X number of wedding size servings. You charge using that number and you tell the client that is how many industry standard servings available in that size cake. You also tell the client if they want bigger servings, then they need to order more cake.




Ditto. Word for word.

And it becomes semantics anyway.

- Assume an 8" cake that serves 24 wedding or 12 party size.
- 24 x $3.00/serving = $72
- The 12 party size pieces are twice as big so the price-per-piece will be twice as much: 12 x $6/serving = oh look! It's the same! $72!!! icon_surprised.gif ..... icon_lol.gif

"The price of the cake is $72. It serves 18-24, depending on how you cut it."

costumeczar Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 10:34am
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi



"The price of the cake is $72. It serves 18-24, depending on how you cut it."




That's exactly what I tell people. And I explain that it's the difference between whether a dieting bride is cutting the pieces, or whether my 14-yr-old son is cutting the pieces! icon_lol.gif

indydebi Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 2:09pm
post #9 of 21

On a catering forum I belong to, another caterer says he uses "Are we feeding linebackers or little old ladies?"

GretchensDelectables Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 2:20pm
post #10 of 21

I've wondered about this as well! Also, which chart do you go by? I've heard alot of people use Erlene's which is different from Wilton's...

indydebi Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 2:27pm
post #11 of 21

I use the wilton wedding chart. (1) most venues cut by this chart. (2) you get more money for the cake (3) in my observations at family birthday parties and gatherings, this is a standard piece of cake that works for everyone. Perfect size for 5 yr old kids. If a 14 yr old teenager wants a bigger piece, he can cut it bigger, but that's like someone eating 4 pcs of chicken out of the bucket ..... if you run out of chicken, it's not because KFC didn't put enough in the bucket!

nonnyscakes Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 2:31pm
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

I use the wilton wedding chart. (1) most venues cut by this chart. (2) you get more money for the cake (3) in my observations at family birthday parties and gatherings, this is a standard piece of cake that works for everyone. Perfect size for 5 yr old kids. If a 14 yr old teenager wants a bigger piece, he can cut it bigger, but that's like someone eating 4 pcs of chicken out of the bucket ..... if you run out of chicken, it's not because KFC didn't put enough in the bucket!




thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif

cakesweetiecake Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 2:40pm
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

On a catering forum I belong to, another caterer says he uses "Are we feeding linebackers or little old ladies?"




icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif That is too funny! LOL!

costumeczar Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 5:40pm
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakesweetiecake

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

On a catering forum I belong to, another caterer says he uses "Are we feeding linebackers or little old ladies?"



icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif That is too funny! LOL!




But have you seen little old ladies eat cake? My MIL inhales it after saying she just wants "a little piece." She'll eat that, then go back for more small pieces. She ends up eating twice as much as anyone else, just in smaller increments!

Last weekend I did a bunch of 5" square table cakes, and I asked my 14-yr-old vaccuum cleaner son how many servings he would get out of one of them. He replied "One." icon_lol.gif

indydebi Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 5:53pm
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

.... and I asked my 14-yr-old vaccuum cleaner son how many servings he would get out of one of them. He replied "One." icon_lol.gif



"Just hand me a fork, mom."

Reminds me of the time (and I've told this story before) that my daughter and I had a big chocolate craving. Found a choc cake mix in the pantry. Baked a single layer 10" cake. Didn't even ice it. Grabbed 2 forks, plopped on the couch and ate it right out of the pan.

How many people will a 10" round serve? Two. Just two. (If it's chocolate and they're female and PMS'ing!!!) icon_lol.gif

nonnyscakes Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 5:57pm
post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

How many people will a 10" round serve? Two. Just two. (If it's chocolate and they're female and PMS'ing!!!) icon_lol.gif




thumbs_up.gif LOVE IT!!! icon_lol.gif Agreed!

costumeczar Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 6:38pm
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

.... and I asked my 14-yr-old vaccuum cleaner son how many servings he would get out of one of them. He replied "One." icon_lol.gif


"Just hand me a fork, mom."

Reminds me of the time (and I've told this story before) that my daughter and I had a big chocolate craving. Found a choc cake mix in the pantry. Baked a single layer 10" cake. Didn't even ice it. Grabbed 2 forks, plopped on the couch and ate it right out of the pan.

How many people will a 10" round serve? Two. Just two. (If it's chocolate and they're female and PMS'ing!!!) icon_lol.gif




Ha ha ha, my son doesn't even need a fork! And on the PMS topic you are so right.

edited to add: I don't want to hijack the thread, but I had a roommate who was standing at the counter at CVS waiting to pay for a box of tampons, some Midol and a big bag of M&Ms. She said the lady in line behind her tapped her on the shoulder and said "I know exactly how you feel, dear." icon_rolleyes.gif

beachcakes Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 7:16pm
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsclox

Here's a question for you...I was just looking at some serving and cutting guides. The wedding servings were 1x2x4 and party were 2x2x4. If I'm making a cake that is just a celebration cake (not wedding) should I charge them based on 2x2x4" servings? For example, a 12" round will serve 56 wedding pieces and 28 party pieces. If I'm making a celebration cake at $3.00 a serving, do I charge $168 or $84? I personally think 2x2x4 is too big. Can you tell I'm new at this?




Party size is 1.5x2x4 for a two layer cake, and 2x2x4 for a single layer. So yes, 2x2x4 is too big and you're shortchanging yourself! icon_smile.gif

cylstrial Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 8:02pm
post #19 of 21

I use the 1x2x4 serving size as well.

TexasRose - I love the idea of having a piece of wood cut to that size.

Superstar2 Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 8:27pm
post #20 of 21

Thanks for bring up this topic "mrsclox" I too have been confused about sering size, chart, etc.

SugarFrosted Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 10:08pm
post #21 of 21

Here is an excellent example of serving sizes:

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=88648

I made some just like these, but out of a giant yellow carwash sponge and craft paint.

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