How Do I Say No

Decorating By idgalpal Updated 29 Sep 2009 , 3:48am by kricket

idgalpal Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 10:39pm
post #1 of 12

I think I've learned from my fellow CCers! I had a co-worker ask me today if I could possibly do a two tier square cake covered in fondant for not much money of course, for her 12 year old daughter's birthday. I think this cake would be a minimum charge of $100 and there's no way she's going to pay that. I just sent her a very nice email thanking her for thinking of me, but I didn't think it was possible for the date she wanted or for less than $100. I lined out the costs for fondant, supports, cake ingredients, decoration ingredients and the time to make the decorations.
She's going to try to make it herself. I think after she tries this she will understand why $100 isn't an outrageous price.

11 replies
bbmom Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 10:41pm
post #2 of 12

Good for you!

LaBellaFlor Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 10:50pm
post #3 of 12

$100 probably would have been a steal of a price. I know this is you co-worker, but just a suggestion, don't break down prices for customers. It just too much 411 and it could lead to people asking you to lower your price by using less expensive ingredients. What they would be, who knows?

this-mama-rocks Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 11:00pm
post #4 of 12

Good for you!!!!

Here's a phrase that works well for me, regardless of the situation, and without too much info for the recipient:

"I'm sorry, it's just not possible for me to do that."

Posted a pic of her cake. I can't wait to see it.

online_annie Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 11:03pm
post #5 of 12

I often share the same problem. People I know that have complained about the cake pricing even on a Walmart level, will certainly gasp at my pricing. Therefore, I always check my schedule or phone as I can often be caught off guard and I simply say with great regret that I am unable to help them as I am completely booked. I then offer to help them create a list of items needed to do it themselves. I get asked this alot and have an EXTREMELY detailed list of every possible item you could need to complete a two tier cake. I even offer retail supply links where items can be found. I'm not one for breaking down my cost for others, however once they look at some of the sites and the hours I suggest to be sure they alot for...they come back and book a cake without complaint or run to walmart. And I'm okay with that. On the other hand, for every potential customer that complains about pricing, I have one that books and their friends at their party book me as well. Do not be afraid to turn orders down. There are plenty of customers that understand the time and artistry that goes into cake decorating. How's this for cheesy: If you bake it....they will come.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 11:17pm
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by online_annie

I often share the same problem. People I know that have complained about the cake pricing even on a Walmart level, will certainly gasp at my pricing. Therefore, I always check my schedule or phone as I can often be caught off guard and I simply say with great regret that I am unable to help them as I am completely booked. I then offer to help them create a list of items needed to do it themselves. I get asked this alot and have an EXTREMELY detailed list of every possible item you could need to complete a two tier cake. I even offer retail supply links where items can be found. I'm not one for breaking down my cost for others, however once they look at some of the sites and the hours I suggest to be sure they alot for...they come back and book a cake without complaint or run to walmart. And I'm okay with that. On the other hand, for every potential customer that complains about pricing, I have one that books and their friends at their party book me as well. Do not be afraid to turn orders down. There are plenty of customers that understand the time and artistry that goes into cake decorating. How's this for cheesy: If you bake it....they will come.


I've had people sound like they fainted when I quoted a price....BUT...if you want me you have to pay my prices....my cakes are scratch baked, all fillings are hand made and I use real butter in my icing...they can't get that at Wal-Mart so if they don't want to pay my price, I figure they can't appreciate my quality....so I let them go.

Tee-Y Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 11:29pm
post #7 of 12

I don't even bother to break down prices cos really the cost of ingredients is just a percentage of the total cost.My time and creativity costs more and most don't get it when you explain so I just give my price, if you can afford it fine if not tar-a-a ,no deal - try elsewhere!!!!I've realised that if you give value for money they would come back even bringing others along and I'm doing just fine!!! icon_lol.gif

sweetcravings Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 12:58am
post #8 of 12

thumbs_up.gif Way to go for sticking to your guns. I know it's hard. I had the same kinda thing happen awhile back with my sister. She wanted me to make a cake for someone on her husbands side of the family. I knew i couldn't get the cost under 100.00...lord knows i tried. We went back and forth, eliminating elements to see if we could get it lower and i couldn't. I was so frustrated by the time we were done. I should've just said from the get go..100.00minimum..well ya live and learn. She didn't order one from me, but that's alright because my time is worth more than the 45.00 she WANTED to spend.
Then today..someone called inquiring about my cream horns. I told them my price and of course they come up with...if i order 5dozen can i get them for less...UM NO. icon_rolleyes.gif You wouldn't walk into the grocery store and expect them to discount your order either, so why should I? I don't even get my stuff wholesale like they do. I just told her in a polite manner that the cost is as listed and if she wants to order them to call me back. I could tell she was a bit taken back at the cost, but oh well. I know what my time is worth to me and i'm not budging.
I'm starting to think that their are very few people in this area that are willing to pay just price for cakes, cookies..they are all too used to the big chain store prices.
thumbsdown.gif

CutiePieCakes-Ontario Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 1:14am
post #9 of 12

This really kills me! Next time, ask them if they've asked their mechnic for a cheaper tune up. icon_rolleyes.gif

I've been lucky enough that those I'm not related to (and have done freebies as my contribution to a shower, christening, etc.) haven't batted an eye when I give them a price. One even said they expected to pay more!!

But I like : I'm sorry, but it's just not possible for me to do that for that price. Try [Walmart/Costco/local grocery chain]. They can help you in your price range.

Carolynlovescake Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 3:11am
post #10 of 12

I've had people ask me to do price break downs for them so I came up with a standard form I use.

I took a picture of a standard half sheet cake with 3 colors of frosting.

The opening paragraph states "the break down is the cost and time to make a basic cake serving X people"

It lists the ingredients for a basic box mix breaks down everything down to the cost of the oil per mix, the cost of each egg, electricity etc.

Then from there I break down my time to mix, prepare and pour.

The next break down is where their jaw drops. The prep time for making a batch of frosting including coloring it.

Then they gasp when they see the decorating time.

My closing paragraph states "for a cake that will be tiered, stacked, or multi flavored extra time of up to X hours is necessary."

It is an eye opener and after that I usually have them saying "I sure don't have time for it and with me not being a professional it will take a lot more time to do then you can do it in."

icon_twisted.gif

idgalpal Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 3:38am
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBellaFlor

$100 probably would have been a steal of a price. I know this is you co-worker, but just a suggestion, don't break down prices for customers. It just too much 411 and it could lead to people asking you to lower your price by using less expensive ingredients. What they would be, who knows?




Good point, I hadn't thought of that.
I think you're right. The funny thing is...in .my 'real job' I negotiate software license agreements-lol. So, I'm very familiar with negotiating prices icon_twisted.gif It's weird when the tables are turned.

kricket Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 3:48am
post #12 of 12

The topic here says "How Do I Say No". Well, it looks like you did a very good job of saying No. It was tactful and honest and you aren't stuck with a cake/price that you regret saying yes to. Good job!

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