Fresh Flowers Without Wilting?

Decorating By Kerry_Kake Updated 2 Oct 2009 , 4:06pm by Kerry_Kake

Kerry_Kake Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 4:24pm
post #1 of 9

Hi all,
I have a cake to do in 3 weeks and she wants fresh gerber daisies on her cake. What do you do? I'm thinking not to stick the stems in the cake but to put them in straws....but won't they wilt? I know I can buy the flower spikes but I don't want to stick them all over the cake. I think she wants them cascading down the side of the cake. Is it possible to do without the flower spikes? Any suggestions?

8 replies
indydebi Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 4:30pm
post #2 of 9

Most flowes are not as fragile as people think they are. They will hold up for quite some time. I believe hydrangeas will wilt inside of 4 seconds but since they are a toxic flower, I don't permit those on my cakes anyway.

On this Gerbera cake, http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1232608 I cut the stems off as close to the head as I could. Place a big blop of icing at the top of the icing stem, then glued the head on the side of the cake with the blop of icing. The flower/stem never penetrated the cake and was easily removed when time to cut the cake.

Same on this one: http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1216689

Flowers were applied at the reception. I always tell my brides just to leave the flowers at the cake table and I'll take care of it when I get there.

Kerry_Kake Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 4:38pm
post #3 of 9

I am not delivering this cake. She will be picking it up, so it will be a couple of hours before hand. Do you thing they will be fine? Hmmm, cutting the stem off so close I would of thought they would wilt faster....I wonder if the icing actually gives the flower moisture?!

Thanks indydebi for the info! icon_smile.gif

indydebi Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 4:47pm
post #4 of 9

again, flowers aren't that fragile. If you want to test some, buy a bunch of those cheap flowers at the grocery. Let them just lay on your table with no water. check them every 30 minutes. It's a great experiement!

Kerry_Kake Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 4:50pm
post #5 of 9

Yeah, and even put some on a blob of icing to see if they hold up better than the ones without icon_wink.gif

Fresh flower experiment....here I come!

indydebi Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 4:57pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kerry_Kake

Yeah, and even put some on a blob of icing to see if they hold up better than the ones without icon_wink.gif




Ohhhh! Great idea!

chouxchoux Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 3:02pm
post #7 of 9

nice cakes indy...what about roses?

indydebi Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 3:26pm
post #8 of 9

Being the former 1991 Mrs. Rose Festival Queen in a town that was proclaimed the City of Roses because we were the largest grower of greenhouse roses in the country, allow me to lend my limited expertise on roses!

Roses are a very thirsty flower. Before planting rose bushes, for example, the plant needs to be given a big long drink ..... have them sit in a pail of water for a LONG time so the stems fill up with water and get the moisture into the petals.

I've used live roses on cakes a number of times (my favorite flower ... go figure!). As long as the roses have been in water for a long time, giving them the time to suck up all the water they can, the rose will hold up great for the few hours they are on a cake.

My favorite story example: The cake that is the icon of how my icing holds up in hot temps .... outside, in August, 90+ degrees, super high humidity, for over 5 hours (set up at 2, cut at 7) ..... was surrounded by fresh roses. No little tubes of water ont he stems, cut the roses laying on the table. They held up great because the florist gave them a big 'ole drink before laying them out.

Kerry_Kake Posted 2 Oct 2009 , 4:06pm
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi


Roses are a very thirsty flower. Before planting rose bushes, for example, the plant needs to be given a big long drink ..... have them sit in a pail of water for a LONG time so the stems fill up with water and get the moisture into the petals.




Well that would explain why my tea rose bush didn't take icon_cry.gif

Experiment...
Ok- the ones in the buttercream wilted first icon_sad.gif......that's not so good! But, I didn't buy flowers, they were ones my daughter picked from outside (jumping jacks- or mini pansies) They did last for about 3 hours in the buttercream and the other about 4 hours. Not bad for picked flowers though eh?

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