Writting

Decorating By nikki1273 Updated 29 Sep 2009 , 4:42pm by kansaswolf

nikki1273 Posted 26 Sep 2009 , 7:34pm
post #1 of 11

I am a novice with beautiful handwritting on paper. However, my attempts on cakes has not been very successful. The writting usually ends up slanted up or down and not uniform. Any tips or suggestions would be greatly appreicated.

10 replies
dorie67 Posted 26 Sep 2009 , 8:00pm
post #2 of 11

I am with you Nikki1273, compliments all the time about the writting on paper. I have several "cheats" from Wilton, they offer pre-printed stamps ie. Happy Birthday, Congratulations etc., also make your own message stamps. These are rather small in size so they seem to get lost on a large cake. I will leave you with the old "practice makes perfect"! princess.gif

arosstx Posted 26 Sep 2009 , 8:06pm
post #3 of 11

In addition to "writting" you always want to check spelling too. I almost put Presley on a cake - it was supposed to be Preslea - I'd never have guessed that!

indydebi Posted 26 Sep 2009 , 8:50pm
post #4 of 11

I also u se the presses (using them is not "cheating" ... it's using a tool designed for use in our trade, just like spatulas, icing bags, and measuring spoons) because my free lance handwriting is terrible.

Some tricks are to move your whole arm, not just your wrist, like you would with a pen. Thinner icing, so you're not squeezing as hard, making your hand shake. Thicker icing also tends to break in the middle of a letter (ewww, I hate that!). Let gravity do the work ... I dont' draw ON the cake, I hold the bag above the cake and let the icing flow down and fall into place. That one takes some practice but once you get there, it looks SO nice.

poohsmomma Posted 26 Sep 2009 , 11:40pm
post #5 of 11

I happened upon a technique in a book that I can't remember the name of.

Using Microsoft Publisher on my computer, I type whatever I want to put on the cake, change the font, spacing, shape etc. to fit the size I need. Then I print it IN REVERSE. I put that backward message under clear acetate, pipe it with royal icing, and let it dry. When it's hard, I just press it into the cake and TA-DAAA, I have a pattern to follow.
I just keep the royal icing in the fridge and pull it out for the lettering. Since it's not actually on the cake, I just keep using the leftovers, and it works fine for that.
Sounds like a lot of steps, but it's really easy, and you're not limited by whatever stamps you might have.

nikki1273 Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 7:11pm
post #6 of 11

Poohsmomma - So, if I am reading correctly, you leave the writting on the acetate and put it on the cake. This is just the information I was looking for. I knew that there had to be a way to incorporate computer technology into this. Thanks! thumbs_up.gif

Carolynlovescake Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 9:34pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by poohsmomma

I happened upon a technique in a book that I can't remember the name of.

Using Microsoft Publisher on my computer, I type whatever I want to put on the cake, change the font, spacing, shape etc. to fit the size I need. Then I print it IN REVERSE. I put that backward message under clear acetate, pipe it with royal icing, and let it dry. When it's hard, I just press it into the cake and TA-DAAA, I have a pattern to follow.
I just keep the royal icing in the fridge and pull it out for the lettering. Since it's not actually on the cake, I just keep using the leftovers, and it works fine for that.
Sounds like a lot of steps, but it's really easy, and you're not limited by whatever stamps you might have.




I do the same except I use a 00 tip and clear piping gel instead of royal icing

poohsmomma Posted 28 Sep 2009 , 10:13pm
post #8 of 11

Clarifying my previous post:
When the royal icing hardens, you use it to press the pattern/writing into the cake and leave an indention that you fill in with the buttercream.

prterrell Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 4:25pm
post #9 of 11

Like anything with cake decorating, practice your writing! The more you practice, the better you'll get!

Tiffany29 Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 4:41pm
post #10 of 11

I hate writting on cakes!! My handwritting is pretty, just not on cake!! I like to practice a little on wax paper before writting on the cake. (tape the wax paper down so it doesn't move.)

kansaswolf Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 4:42pm
post #11 of 11

I usually print something out in a nice font, cover the paper with waxed paper and then trace the letters in chocolate. This doesn't work for ALL cakes, but that's what I do!

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