Heating Core Vs Strips

Decorating By dnrlee Updated 29 Sep 2009 , 3:24am by PuffCake

dnrlee Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 7:40pm
post #1 of 16

Which is better? I currently use the strips but they can sometimes be a pain when dealing with large or odd shaped pans. Does the heating core better?

15 replies
GottaLuvCake Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 7:45pm
post #2 of 16

I have been reading a lot of posts about using a flower nail which i think is a fantastic idea. I had been out of the loop for a while before i got on here and learned so much, its been great. Search the flower nail thing

GrannieJ Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 7:49pm
post #3 of 16

I use rose nails all the time. They work great!!

kat518 Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 8:03pm
post #4 of 16

Hi ...
I've use the heating core as well....the nails are easier and you only end up with a very small hole...the core you have to fill it with cake batter and then remove the cake batter once cooked and fill the hole in the cake........more trouble than it's worth....in my opnion
Kat icon_wink.gif
Joliet,Il

mommyle Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 8:29pm
post #5 of 16

I love the strips, but I use the core for the ball pan (the large one).

dnrlee Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 8:30pm
post #6 of 16

so do I use the flower nail in addition to the strips or alone?

emlashlee Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 8:37pm
post #7 of 16

I've never heard of people doing both before. For really large cakes, someone suggested using multiple flower nails spread evenly around the pan. One works just fine for me with 10" cakes, but I'd definitely use more with 12" or larger IMO.

grandmom Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 8:40pm
post #8 of 16

I do both.

turnerdmann Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 8:58pm
post #9 of 16

I like the heating core. It works better for me than the strips. (I don't know why) The core I can remove as soon as cake comes from oven. I then replace cake plug in cake and invert pan. I had trouble with nail when I inverted pan, even on raised rack. But I am not the most coordinated so it was probably just me. icon_smile.gif

dnrlee Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 9:16pm
post #10 of 16

Thanks everyone! I think that I'm going to try the nails first and go from there icon_smile.gif

PuffCake Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 9:16pm
post #11 of 16

I use both the strips and a flower nail. I'm convinced they really do make a difference.

dnrlee Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 9:25pm
post #12 of 16

so it really is best to use both? i have great results with the strips. Just looking for something that might be a little easier to maneuver.

jdconcc Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 9:35pm
post #13 of 16

I've started using the flower nail method or at least I tried it twice and both times the nail went rusty ... it's now in the bin with the cakes! Was it just my nail???

Melony Posted 25 Sep 2009 , 9:41pm
post #14 of 16

I use both too. I think it definitely makes a difference IMO. icon_smile.gif

mrsclox Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 12:52am
post #15 of 16

I hate the heating core. I think it's a huge pain and I always have big depressions in my cakes. How do you use the flower nail? I'm envisioning sticking it in the batter and it falling over. Obviously there's got to be more to it. Any my flower nail isn't very long, doesn't the cake raise up taller than the nail?

PuffCake Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 3:24am
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsclox

I hate the heating core. I think it's a huge pain and I always have big depressions in my cakes. How do you use the flower nail? I'm envisioning sticking it in the batter and it falling over. Obviously there's got to be more to it. Any my flower nail isn't very long, doesn't the cake raise up taller than the nail?




Yes, sometimes the cake raises taller than the nail, but it doesn't matter. It still brings heat to the center of the cake to help it bake more evenly. The nail sits upside down in the pan with the flat round piece against the bottom of the pan and the nail sticking straight up. There's a tutorial complete with pictures on the homepage. Scroll down below newest cake recipes.

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