Anyone Try This Fondant Recipe?

Decorating By d12bn Updated 30 Sep 2009 , 4:59pm by wendalynn11

d12bn Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 3:57pm
post #1 of 17

Just wondering if anyone has tried this fondant recipe

Ingredients required to make the fondant recipe:

* 1 Tbsp of unflavored gelatin
* 1/4 cup of cold water
* 1 tsp of almond extract
* 1/2 cup of light corn syrup (If a corn syrup is not available, you can substitute it with a sugar syrup made with 1-1/4 cups sugar and 1/3 cup water, boiled together until syrupy)
* 1 Tbsp of glycerin (some recipes say itâs optional, believe me, itâs a must)
* 2 lbs 10X confectionersâ sugar
* 1/2 tsp of white vegetable shortening

Here's the link

http://thecookduke.com/fondant-recipe/

16 replies
pouchet82 Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 4:21pm
post #2 of 17

I use a similar recipe minus the shortening, and vanilla extract instead of almond. It's the only fondant recipe I have ever used. When I roll it out I grease my counter with shortening, otherwise I have a huge mess

jardot22 Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 4:58pm
post #3 of 17

This is very similar to Michelle Foster's fondant, except cut in half. It looks like it would work out just fine. I know I love MFF personally.

Win Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 5:07pm
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jardot22

This is very similar to Michelle Foster's fondant, except cut in half. It looks like it would work out just fine. I know I love MFF personally.




I thought the same thing... but it looks a little more "jumbled" in its instructions. To me, it assumes a lot about what you should know to look for in texture, etc. Personally, I'd rather go with Michele's knowing it's almost "no fail" and an exceptional amount of fondant when it is all put together. With this recipe, it looks like you would have to double it up just to have enough to cover three small tiers whereas 1 recipe of Michele's will do just that.

d12bn Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 5:08pm
post #5 of 17

I made it once without the glycerin and it was sticky and stretched to easy when lifted. I bought some glycerin today and thought I would try it again.

I plan on covering a 2 tier cake. The bottom will be 8" round and about 5" tall. The first time I made the fondant without glycerin there is no way I could have rolled out a piece big enough to cover the bottom and lift it without tearing. Do you'll think this will be an issue?

I will also look for Michelle Foster's fondant recipe, if someone has a link let me have it please.

Thanks everyone

Win Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 5:27pm
post #6 of 17

If you are making fondant all the way up from gelatin, the glycerin is a key element in doing so. It is what gives your fondant its pliability. You can buy it (food grade)in the pharmacy department of Walmart. Wilton sells a small bottle, but your economical value is at Walmart. People who make fondant with marshmallows don't necessarily need glycerin, but still sometimes add a couple of teaspoons for the pliability it provides.

I am providing the link to the original posting of Michele Foster's Delicious Fondant. It was reposted by Michele herself just a few months ago, but I think this one is more comprehensive in reading. Both are her's just one posted by a different person with her permission.

Many questions people have are:

* Do I have to use milk? No. You can use any liquid such as water, dairy creamer, skim milk, etc.

*How long is is good? It will keep for a long period. If not using it immediately, go ahead and refrigerate it.

One of the big mistakes people make is not allowing the warm liquid to cool down to lukewarm. That is key. If you use the liquid too hot, you end up having to use much more sugar than the recipe calls for.

Yes. Strain it into the sugar. This removes any lumps of gelatin, etc.

Just follow this recipe as it reads and you will have a great tasting, great working batch of fondant.

Happy caking! (and welcome to CC!)

Win Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 5:28pm
post #7 of 17

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Here's the link to the original posting of Michele's Delicious Fondant:

http://cakecentral.com/recipes/3663/michele-fosters-delicious-fondant

jobueno Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 8:00pm
post #8 of 17

This is the recipe I have used since I started baking. I have made the MMF and maybe it's because I live in TX but I don't like the way MMF behaves, it's crumblu and dry whenever I make it versus the one made from gelatin. I vote hands down the scratch recipie,

d12bn Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 8:02pm
post #9 of 17

Ok just finished making some fondant. The directions say to wrap it for 24 hours, do I leave it out or refrigerate it for 24 hours?

How do I know if it is stiff enough? I used almost 4 lbs of powdered sugar and it feels a little soft unless it will stiffen after 24 hours?

Thats a lot of work by hand!

Thanks

crazydoglady Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 8:32pm
post #10 of 17

i wrap fondant securely and leave it at room temperature.

michelle foster also posted additional info about her recipe with a faq.

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-625727-mff.html+information

Win Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 9:36pm
post #11 of 17

Leave it out. Also, you don't have to wait a full 24 hours... it's more of "use it the next day" thing. Let it rest at least 8 hours; however.

It's fine that it still feels a little soft. I think it is even mentioned on there not to let it get super hard because then it is hard to soften back up. Much easier if you have to knead a little more ps into tomorrow when you start working with it. I think you will find that it is perfect tomorrow having had time to absorb all the ps and meld the flavors.

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d12bn Posted 29 Sep 2009 , 4:21pm
post #12 of 17

Well I did not have good luck with the homemade fondant. It was impossible to cover the cake. When I put it over the cake it just bunched up around the bottom of the cake and made huge wrinkles. I had to tear the fondant off and patch in some more.

I figured maybe I didn't roll a big enough piece so I rolled a huge piece for the smaller top tier and it was even worse!

I ended up making another second tier and covered with icing then put fondant decorations on it.

Next time I will just order some fondant or just use fondant for decorations over icing.

Anyway I was able to hide the flaws and the top tier with icing came out great.

Image

Win Posted 30 Sep 2009 , 2:11pm
post #13 of 17

Hmm... below is a link with a cake I just did this past week using the same recipe. I have never had it bunch up at the bottom as you describe. (which by the way, you hear about happening even with purchased fondants.) It makes me wonder if you allowed the cake to settle enough before you applied the fondant? A cake should be allowed to settle ideally overnight at room temp after you have applied the crumb coat. Another method of allowed it to settle properly is to assemble it, lay a protective barrier on top and then place a cookie sheet with weight on it on top of that. Some say they use a cookie sheet with a brick. I have a marble tile I use. Even this method requires a minimum amount of time --about an hour and up to two. If the cake has settled properly, it will not continue to sink under the weight of the fondant after it has been applied thus eliminating the wrinkling at the base.

link: [url] http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1470778

[/url]
I'm just guessing. You might have done exactly as described above.

Either way, your cake is ADORABLE!!! I absolute love it. It turned out great either way --just sorry you had to pull your hair out to achieve such perfection!

Happy caking!

d12bn Posted 30 Sep 2009 , 2:23pm
post #14 of 17

I think the problem was my cakes were to tall for this fondant, a little over 4 inches. And I don't think this fondant is pliable enough. The cakes did cool and settle over night plus this bunching happened as I was trying to smooth out the fondant as I was putting it on the cake.
I am guessing do to the fact that I have no experience with fondant. After watching several videos on line and seeing fondant applied on TV many times I am almost sure this fondant I made is the problem. Watching video the fondant bunches or wrinkles up around the bottom of the cake then it is just worked out easily, where with my experience it just made big rolls at the bottom. Again maybe I could have worked out the wrinkles if my cake was shorter.

Anyway its a learning process.

wendalynn11 Posted 30 Sep 2009 , 2:32pm
post #15 of 17

I have made MFF 3 separate times now and each time it has ended up a crumbly mess. I wish I knew what I was doing wrong, I love the taste and would much prefer to use home made fondant as all of the rest of my ingredients are home made. I followed the recipe exactly each time and got the same crumbly results each time. icon_sad.gif

Win Posted 30 Sep 2009 , 4:27pm
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by d12bn

I think the problem was my cakes were to tall for this fondant, a little over 4 inches. And I don't think this fondant is pliable enough. The cakes did cool and settle over night plus this bunching happened as I was trying to smooth out the fondant as I was putting it on the cake.
I am guessing do to the fact that I have no experience with fondant. After watching several videos on line and seeing fondant applied on TV many times I am almost sure this fondant I made is the problem. Watching video the fondant bunches or wrinkles up around the bottom of the cake then it is just worked out easily, where with my experience it just made big rolls at the bottom. Again maybe I could have worked out the wrinkles if my cake was shorter.

Anyway its a learning process.




Absolutely a learning process! But, you did great, so it will be uphill the rest of the way for you.

No, no... 4" cakes are often covered in fondant, so that's not the issue... and I have never used a more pliable fondant that Michele's. I roll it out once, flip it onto the cake, smooth out the pleats, and trim it. It has never failed me. Again, sorry that you found it hard to work with.

Wendalynn11:

Crumbly says to me that you are mixing in too much powdered sugar upon the initial making of this fondant. I've never had it come out crumbly. If you allowed it to cool to lukewarm as per the recipe, then I have found I use only about 3.5 lbs of powdered sugar. It still can be punched and leave a mark when I am done kneading it. Then I wrap it and leave it overnight. By then, it has absorbed all the ps and has always been a dream for me to work with. It's stiff when I take it out of the plastic, but kneads easily back into a workable dough.

HTH!

wendalynn11 Posted 30 Sep 2009 , 4:59pm
post #17 of 17

Win
Thank you so much for the advise! I am going try another batch tonight! I so want it to work, I hate spending the money on satin ice when I have the ingredients right here to make my own! Thanks again!

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