Carved Cakes...offering To Sell Remains As Cruffles

Business By BAKE-ME-A-CAKE Updated 23 Sep 2009 , 12:13am by Kitagrl

BAKE-ME-A-CAKE Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 9:30pm
post #1 of 22

My fellow bakers -
I want to offer, as an option, cake balls (or as I learned on this site CRUFFLES for cake truffles, I love the name) for my customers that order a carved cake. I have a repeat customer that orders often and I just made her a carved cake and gave her the remains as CRUFFLES for free, in hopes that she will order them next time.
Does anyone do this?
What do you charge?
My carved cakes start at $3.50/serving and I count every serving (before carving), they get less cake of course because some is carved off. I have to consider the time and cost of making cake balls with the remains so I don't want to give them away. I would be essentially charging them twice for some of the cake. BUT then it's the difficulty in knowing how many cruffles they will get.
I was thinking this: charge my usual for the cake, and give the option of cake balls for an additional $10 (you might get 10, you might get 20...). If they don't want the cruffles then I "dispose" of the cake remains that they are paying for. Your thoughts???
Thanks.

21 replies
Parable Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 9:35pm
post #2 of 22

I am just a hobbyist but I love the name "CRUFFLES"!

CakeForte Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 1:39am
post #3 of 22

You might disagree with me, but your pricing is off. You say you charge per serving BEFORE carving.....so they are actually getting LESS that what they are asking for on a carved cake. Then you're selling it to them again as "cruffles" even though they paid for it the first time. That's wrong/SHADY IMO.

playingwithsugar Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 2:08am
post #4 of 22

I don't think it's that shady. I'm taking into consideration that they have to have binder and coating added, plus time. I think it's a good idea to offer them as an option, but charge minimally.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

redpanda Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 2:11am
post #5 of 22

I don't think the intention is to charge again for the cake trimmings. I think it is pretty much standard practice to charge for the amount of cake you make, not what is left after carving, since you did use those ingredients.

So, as long as the additional charge for the cruffles is for the labor (and additional ingredients to make them), not for the cake trimmings, it isn't charging twice for the same cake.

Does this make sense?

playingwithsugar Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 2:12am
post #6 of 22

Yes, redpanda, that's exactly where I was trying to go with it. Thanks for the clarity.

Theresa icon_smile.gif

lardbutt Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 3:27am
post #7 of 22

I usually dip mine in chocolate. I am ALWAYS surprised at how much it actually takes.....chocolate is expensive!! I think you would most certainly charge for them! (don't forget..... time IS money)

I have never heard the term "cruffles".....LOVE IT!

indydebi Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 4:01am
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Quote:

I don't think it's that shady. I'm taking into consideration that they have to have binder and coating added, plus time. I think it's a good idea to offer them as an option, but charge minimally.




You're taking a scrap product and adding a value-added process to make it valuable "again". Otherwise, it's just trash.

Not a dang thing "shady" about it.

And there are many many threads on here where CC'ers are reprimanded for NOT charging for the cake baked instead of the cake carved. Yes, it is totally appropriate (and smart business) to factor in ALL raw materials .... including carved away cake ... as part of the cost of the product.

I did it in my manufacturing-pricing job all the time.

pattycakes55d Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 8:22pm
post #9 of 22

love "cruffles". I'd like to do that too. In Vancouver we don't see the likes of cake balls, etc. so it would be a novelty. What was the consensus on pricing?

dawncr Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 2:30am
post #10 of 22

Just to give credit where credit is due......

I *think* it was Leah_S who coined the term "cruffles." I remember because I thought it was brilliant, too.

Correct me if I've misremembered.

itsacake Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 7:27pm
post #11 of 22

What Indydebi said....

In a production bakery, you would take all your cake scraps, etc. and turn them into rum balls, danish filling, trifle, etc. etc. Nothing shady about it at all. That is the way it works.

And no need to charge minimally. Dipping takes time, chocolate is expensive. Price them as a gourmet item. The idea of having a business is to make money! Is it not?

Kitagrl Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 7:42pm
post #12 of 22

I only charge for the servings the person ordered for a sculpted cake. BUT I charge a ton more than 3.50/serving too. I guess its just in how you say it...if you are charging $4 for 50 servings or $8 for 25 servings. *shrugs*

I would probably just freeze the scraps and sell Cruffles as a side item to anyone.

3GCakes Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 8:12pm
post #13 of 22

I'm confused....if you need a carved cake to serve 75....you don't bake a cake for 75 and then carve it...then it will not feed 75.

You bake a cake for 100, carve it to shape AND to feed 75....right?

So if you have to bake a bigger cake to get the shape and the servings out....that is why you charge more for a carved cake, right?

I think when it is referred to as shady the poster means that...uh...you are NOT getting what you paid for in the sense that you would not be getting the number of servings needed and ordered.

I THINK that is what is thought to be shady...and I don't think it sounds right either.

I doubt that when Duff or many others make a carved cake that the same pricing per serving BEFORE carving would apply, but more that the end pricing for the servings recieved is INCREASED.

grandmom Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 8:41pm
post #14 of 22

Off the topic here... but Indydebi, how many lives have you led?

Ok, you did insurance for a while... and something here about manufacturing/pricing... and we all know now that you do cakes and catering, and obviously do it quite well!

No wonder you have so much business savvy! What else have you done?

indydebi Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 8:56pm
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandmom

Off the topic here... but Indydebi, how many lives have you led?

Ok, you did insurance for a while... and something here about manufacturing/pricing... and we all know now that you do cakes and catering, and obviously do it quite well!

No wonder you have so much business savvy! What else have you done?




Ahhhh! The advantages of being old! So much life experience! (Dont' forget my time working at the cremation casket manufacturing place. Part of my job was to take our international visitors on tours .... they loved visiting American graveyards and funeral homes!)

bbmom Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:05pm
post #16 of 22

Ok, my opinion as well. If I order a carved cake for 100 I expect to get 100 servings. It cost more per serving because there is more waste, more time. You need to bake extra to account for what is carved away so the person still gets the same servings. I wouldnt bother trying to sell the cake balls to the same cust. They freeze well. You can keep the crumbs and frosting in the freezer, then dip as needed. Have you seen the ones that Bakerella does hers are little works of art and I imagine would sell for more than just a plain dipped ball. So you need to figure out your time and ingreds and amount of decor and packaging. Maybe they're $1 or $2 a piece-think gourmet truffles. Or they're $11.95 a lb like a fudge or something. Just my opinion. I wouldnt market them as a leftover.

indydebi Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:17pm
post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbmom

Ok, my opinion as well. If I order a carved cake for 100 I expect to get 100 servings. It cost more per serving because there is more waste, more time. You need to bake extra to account for what is carved away so the person still gets the same servings. I wouldnt bother trying to sell the cake balls to the same cust. They freeze well. You can keep the crumbs and frosting in the freezer, then dip as needed. Have you seen the ones that Bakerella does hers are little works of art and I imagine would sell for more than just a plain dipped ball. So you need to figure out your time and ingreds and amount of decor and packaging. Maybe they're $1 or $2 a piece-think gourmet truffles. Or they're $11.95 a lb like a fudge or something. Just my opinion. I wouldnt market them as a leftover.



Agree on all points! thumbs_up.gif Gourmet, not leftovers!

Kitagrl Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:36pm
post #18 of 22

I don't even know that I'd want the customer knowing I made them out of "cake scraps"...they should think its a fresh, secret recipe confection made just for them. thumbs_up.gif

melmar02 Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:46pm
post #19 of 22

I have a co-worker that only sells cake bites and she charges for them like a gourmet item

6 for $12
12 for $24
24 for 45
36 for $70
$21 / dozen after that.

Kiddiekakes Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 10:10pm
post #20 of 22

Gourmet is right...Do you think resteraunts throw away leftovers...Nope they makes soups etc to use everything up and make their profit stretch! I would do the same!!

cylstrial Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 12:10am
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitagrl

I don't even know that I'd want the customer knowing I made them out of "cake scraps"...they should think its a fresh, secret recipe confection made just for them. thumbs_up.gif




Exactly! It's a great way to reuse the leftovers that would otherwise just get thrown away or possibly eaten by a family member!

Kitagrl Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 12:13am
post #22 of 22

I've tried it a few times but they always seem to taste like mushy cake to me...I'm one of those that if something even remotely resembles soggy bread/cereal I can't take it.

Maybe I should try making them just without any liquid or icing....

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