Covering Sports Ball Cake With Fondant

Decorating By kilikina_24 Updated 18 Sep 2010 , 1:40pm by snertlebert

kilikina_24 Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 6:48pm
post #1 of 12

Hi everyone! I'm hoping for a little help. I'm planning on making a cake this week with the Wilton sports ball pan. I've covered a few cakes with fondant (round and square) but am wondering if anyone has any tips on coving the ball cakes with fondant? Thanks for any help!

11 replies
Win Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 7:05pm
post #2 of 12

I'm getting ready to cover one for the second time in fondant. I decided after I did the first one that I'm going to use much less filling in the center so that the seams are tighter. I didn't like how much the seams showed under my fondant. Other than that, it went just fine. I rolled out a circle, laid it over the ball, smoothed it down and trimmed excess just the same as I have done all other cakes.

Not much help here, but don't sweat it too much... it wasn't so bad!

kilikina_24 Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 7:18pm
post #3 of 12

Thanks for that tip! I tend to stuff my cakes with filling--lol!! So that's good to know--I'll go easy on the filling this time.

tracey1970 Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 1:07am
post #4 of 12

I've done it too - the golf ball in my photos. I did find that I perhaps put a bit too much BC under my fondant, but I used more because I got advice to put more BC on when you are wanting to push in the dimples (to give something to push into). I would use a bit less next time as I had issues with BC coming out the bottom during the dimpling. The hardest part was smoothing the very underside of the ball. Thus, the grass (lol)!

kilikina_24 Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 4:45pm
post #5 of 12

tracey--that golf ball is awesome!! Thanks for the advice!! I'm attempting to make an 8 ball for my son's 8th birthday (he loves to play pool with his dad). It's going to be a cookies and cream cake. My husband is now trying to talk me into covering the ball with finely ground oreos to get the black color instead of black fondant. Of course I want the look of fondant but he thinks this will taste better and go with the flavor of the cake. So, I guess I'll try the oreos and if I hate it go with the fondant. Thanks again!! Now I want to try the golf ball cake....maybe for my husband's birthday!

Win Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 4:50pm
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by kilikina_24

tracey--that golf ball is awesome!! Thanks for the advice!! I'm attempting to make an 8 ball for my son's 8th birthday (he loves to play pool with his dad). It's going to be a cookies and cream cake. My husband is now trying to talk me into covering the ball with finely ground oreos to get the black color instead of black fondant. Of course I want the look of fondant but he thinks this will taste better and go with the flavor of the cake. So, I guess I'll try the oreos and if I hate it go with the fondant. Thanks again!! Now I want to try the golf ball cake....maybe for my husband's birthday!




If your husband is anti black fondant then you might as well go ahead and cover it in buttercream smoothed flat with a Viva. From personal experience, you will never get a good coverage with the finely ground Oreos - no matter how fine you think you got them. They always want to show a little of the buttercream layer underneath. icon_rolleyes.gif

tiggy2 Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 4:58pm
post #7 of 12

I have to make a volleyball next month and was wondering how to do the grooves. Should I just use a regular layer of BC underneath and push the groves in with a fondant tool?

Win Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 5:32pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiggy2

I have to make a volleyball next month and was wondering how to do the grooves. Should I just use a regular layer of BC underneath and push the groves in with a fondant tool?




I'd say yes, much like Tracey describes above... her golf ball is so cute, she is obviously the one to answer in full.

Rylan Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 6:01pm
post #9 of 12

I also suggest you elevate the ball on top of something small and then lay your fondant. That way, your chances of getting folds on the bottom will be lesser.

tracey1970 Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 8:31pm
post #10 of 12

Yes, I would lay on the fondant smooth and then maybe using a ball tool (but not the ball end, the other end that's curved) lightly score in the lines and go over them until they ae the depth you want. Again, I wouldn't layer on the BC any thicker than for a normal cake if I had to do the indentations again since the excess did bulge out at the bottom of the ball. You should get a nice indentation with the fondant rolled to maybe 1/4" thickness and the usual pre-fondant coat of BC under that.

kilikina_24 Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 12:15am
post #11 of 12

Well, I ended up trying the oreo method my husband asked for. I figured if it worked out he'd be happy and if it didn't work out I still had time to go get the fondant before our family party tomorrow night. I tried attaching the picture to this post but I guess I haven't figured that out yet. It's in my photos. It turned out better than I thought! Far from perfect, but a fun cake for my son!

snertlebert Posted 18 Sep 2010 , 1:40pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tracey1970

I've done it too - the golf ball in my photos. I did find that I perhaps put a bit too much BC under my fondant, but I used more because I got advice to put more BC on when you are wanting to push in the dimples (to give something to push into). I would use a bit less next time as I had issues with BC coming out the bottom during the dimpling. The hardest part was smoothing the very underside of the ball. Thus, the grass (lol)!




Your golf ball is amazing!! what did you use to make the indentations please??

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