BellesMom Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 5:24pm
post #1 of

I have been asked to do my first wedding cake - and not sure how much to charge her. Her budget is not very big and she wants to have a cake like this (red velvet & yellow cake). Thanks for any feedback!! icon_smile.gif
LL

81 replies
BellesMom Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 5:35pm
post #2 of

I forgot to add that she needs it to serve at least 50 people

misscoffey Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 5:41pm
post #3 of

It depends on what you feel your time, experience, and materials are worth. I have been working on a fee for mine and came up with a flat rate depemnding on the type of cake and how much work is involved. I bake from scratch and take all my costs for that into consideration, check out what others in the area might be charging and how much time is involved for me to make the cake from start to finish.

I cannot give you a set price, but most people I have researched in my area would charge by the slice at around $3-$5 for a wedding cake.

Hope that helps some...

Texas_Rose Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 5:42pm
post #4 of

That cake will serve more than 50...looks like a 10" round, 8" square, 6" round which would be 82 servings.

Will you be making the flowers or using silk? Those flowers would take time and cutters if you don't have them already.

The other thing is, you'll have to transport assembled, do you have room in your vehicle and are you confident enough with the support system that you use to do that?

I made my friend's wedding cake for $100 mostly because I wanted to be able to say I'd made a wedding cake for someone. The $100 didn't quite cover the supplies and ingredients and the cake was a ton of work. I probably would have charged a stranger about $400 for the same cake (if I sold cakes).

misscoffey Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 5:42pm
post #5 of

(sorry) depending

BellesMom Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 5:54pm
post #6 of

I am planning on using silk flowers - and I am kind of in the same boat as Texas_Rose was....when she asked, i jumped at the chance to do a wedding cake because she started out with a two tier heart shaped red velvet cake with butter cream and a couple of roses on it..........but as you can see, it turned into much more than that!

Thanks for your help ladies icon_smile.gif

nickymom Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 6:00pm
post #7 of

can't help you but WOW what a pretty cake!

-K8memphis Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 6:01pm
post #8 of

Round cake on bottom with square cake on top does not fit the 2 inch graduation thing we can go by with all the same shape cakes--that would have to be about a 6 to 7 inch square to fit within the 10" so comfy.

I would do a 10x6x5. maybe 10x6x4.

This would result in about 60 servings give or take.

And same price as has been mentioned plus a little bit more for the flowers is how I would do it.

kakeladi Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 6:08pm
post #9 of

It is going to be hard to come up with only 50 (or slightly over) servings for a 3 tier cake.
Take out your pans and see what small size sq fits on a round and what tiny round pan do you have to make the top tier?
An 8" sq - if I remember right - is too big to fit on a 10" round.
Consider using a styrofoam sq. A 12" round will give you plenty of servings based on the industry standard of a serving being 1x2x4.
As for pricing no less than $3-4 per serving. Maybe add another $10-15 for the swag and flowers. Oh, and if you do use styro still charge about $2-3 for how many servings one would get out of it - I think it's 25 servings for an 8" sq.
Sooooooo if you use a 12 R; 8 sq; and 5 R the price should be somewhere in the range of $200-250.

cylstrial Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 12:07am

It's a beautiful cake! I would price each of those flowers separately if it were me.

tonedna Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 12:17am

I would go more on the range of $500 to $650. Usually if they dont have the budget I move them to something
that goes more to what they can pay for. Is not fair your work has to suffer cause they dont have the budget.
Teach your clients to go for what they cant buy or you will end up loosing money.
Edna icon_smile.gif

madgeowens Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 12:28am

Wow its a beautiful cake........I WOULD LISTEN TO TONEDNA MYSELF icon_smile.gif

BellesMom Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 3:39pm

Thanks so much for all of your help icon_smile.gif

MikeRowesHunny Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 3:46pm

$6 per serving plus the flowers.

indydebi Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 4:18pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

Wow its a beautiful cake........I WOULD LISTEN TO TONEDNA MYSELF icon_smile.gif



me, too.

And k8 is right. An 8" square is 8" from side to side, but it's close to 12" from corner to corner.

So I think this is 6/8/12, which serves 12/32/56 = 100. Is she willing to buy twice as much cake as she needs just to have this look?

With the fondant/flower work, it's easily in the $500 range.

MissCakeCrazy Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:02pm

Edna, how do you make your customers overspend on their budget? I have recently lost a perspective customer as the bride set her budget really low, I tried to accomadate and reduce my price but she wanted it ridiculusly low. In the end she found a bakers that would do her wedding cake really cheap. Her budget was £200. I quoted £240 with the delivery fee. The cake was worth much more, around £300 but I reduced the price. Her fiance later enquired about a wedding cake at a bakers near his office and they were selling a 3 tiered cake for just £100! I couldn't compete with that and there was no way I would have brought my price down that low, not worth the effort. I was really excited about getting my first customer, now I feel hopeless in getting customers.

indydebi Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:26pm

I don't think it's a case of getting them to overspend, but more of showing them what your cake is worth and the bride making a decision of what's important to her. She might budget $500 for a dress, but when she sees THE dress .... with a pricetag of $850 .... many find a way to get THE dress.

My first question, when they give a really low number, is "How did you come up with that number?" If it was pulled from certain parts of their body, then that's when you have a problem because it means they've done NO research and have NO idea what things cost. Those are the biggest challenges.

jenmat Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:27pm

Also, are you ready for the pain this cake will be, especially since you are new to the wedding cake process? This is NOT an easy cake to make- there is no grace with that fondant, and squares are more difficult sometimes to cover than round. There are no do-dads, scrolls, or ANYTHING except a swag and flowers. Almost EVERY flaw will show up- even lint! I would do as they say and if she wants this cake, then do most of it in fake cake! Also, charge her for that extra time it will take to get the thing close to perfect. Not to group everyone in the same boat, but sometimes the cheapest brides are the ones that complain the loudest! And if she does, it will not be her fault if you agree to charge her pennies for it!

__Jamie__ Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:38pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

Wow its a beautiful cake........I WOULD LISTEN TO TONEDNA MYSELF icon_smile.gif


me, too.

And k8 is right. An 8" square is 8" from side to side, but it's close to 12" from corner to corner.
So I think this is 6/8/12, which serves 12/32/56 = 100. Is she willing to buy twice as much cake as she needs just to have this look?

With the fondant/flower work, it's easily in the $500 range.




Exactly. Anyone thinking about doing different shaped stacked cakes needs to take out a ruler right now and draw out your 6", 8" squares etc. etc., and you see exactly how much surface area you have to play with.

sadsmile Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 9:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCakeCrazy

Edna, how do you make your customers overspend on their budget?




Usually if they dont have the budget I move them to something
that goes more to what they can pay for. Is not fair your work has to suffer cause they dont have the budget.
Teach your clients to go for what they cant buy or you will end up loosing money.
Edna


I think she meant to type: Teach your clients to go for what the can buy or you will end up loosing money.

prterrell Posted 22 Sep 2009 , 10:24pm

It really depends on what is important to the bride. I spent more on my cake than on my dress, because I wanted a cake that was better than something I could do myself (wasn't going to put myself through the stress of making my own cake). I had a look I wanted (gumpaste replica of my bouquet as the topper with a fondant ribbon draped down the tiers that matched bridesmaids' dresses) and wanted the cake to taste awesome, too and was willing to pay for these things. The dress? didn't care about it being a designer dress at all. Just wanted something that made me feel pretty. Dress-$400 Cake-$550 (note: this was in 2003).

Some brides don't care as much about the cake, what's imporant to them is having a designer dress, or a live band, or a sit-down seven course dinner, or what ever it is that makes their wedding special to them. If the bride doesn't care about the cake, you might not get that order, because a big box store cookie-cutter cake is fine with them.


Then you have the brides that are just clueless about what things cost. Those can be harder to deal with because they have a *look* in mind but want to pay peanuts for diamonds. icon_rolleyes.gif Chances are, if they find someone to do the cake they have in mind for the price they want to pay, you'll end up seeing the cake on Cake Wrecks. icon_evil.gif

lardbutt Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 1:20am
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by madgeowens

Wow its a beautiful cake........I WOULD LISTEN TO TONEDNA MYSELF icon_smile.gif


me, too.

And k8 is right. An 8" square is 8" from side to side, but it's close to 12" from corner to corner.
So I think this is 6/8/12, which serves 12/32/56 = 100. Is she willing to buy twice as much cake as she needs just to have this look?

With the fondant/flower work, it's easily in the $500 range.



Exactly. Anyone thinking about doing different shaped stacked cakes needs to take out a ruler right now and draw out your 6", 8" squares etc. etc., and you see exactly how much surface area you have to play with.



I'm such a "have to see it" kinda person, I have to pull my pans out to see what will work!

indydebi Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 1:37am
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Exactly. Anyone thinking about doing different shaped stacked cakes needs to take out a ruler right now and draw out your 6", 8" squares etc. etc., and you see exactly how much surface area you have to play with.


This is a great example of how having some square dummies around comes in handy. I can stack them up and show the bride how a configuration may or may not work. I can show them that a "square-diamond-square" set up (with 3 square cakes) can't work, but if we just turn them slightly (like a winding stairway), it will work fine! Priceless visual!

__Jamie__ Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 1:50am

Here is a 6" round on an 8" square, and a 6" square on an 8" round. You can see how one config works fine, and the other one does not.

Ignore the water spots.
LL

sweetreasures Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 2:45am
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi

Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Exactly. Anyone thinking about doing different shaped stacked cakes needs to take out a ruler right now and draw out your 6", 8" squares etc. etc., and you see exactly how much surface area you have to play with.

This is a great example of how having some square dummies around comes in handy. I can stack them up and show the bride how a configuration may or may not work. I can show them that a "square-diamond-square" set up (with 3 square cakes) can't work, but if we just turn them slightly (like a winding stairway), it will work fine! Priceless visual!




Indydebi,
That's a great idea using the dummies in that way and for a visual on height . It did not occur to me to use them for anything put decorating.

When I made my daughter's wedding cake I stacked the pans on top of each other. Since I only had 1 of each size I had to use the pans I wasn't going to use to add the height. It didn't help that much, I ended up getting the yard stick out. Also the bottom tier was 20" but the pan was a 1/2 round so that didn't help much either.

madgeowens Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 5:30am

Can anyone tell me what the sizes of those layers are in the photo?

madgeowens Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 5:32am

lol as you can see, I didnt read the latest posts.........so you think 12,8 and 6?

madgeowens Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 5:38am

lol OMG..............is that really going to be hard? this is what I have hanging on my fridge to make for my own birthday this week.........except I will change from white to pink rose on cake, and maybe use white drapes...never did drapes and I am doing gumpaste roses for first time........everyone told me to challenge myself.yikes sounds like I may have a disaster birthday cake...............so I am confused..what size square on top of the 12 inch round?

patticakesnc Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 5:53am
Quote:
Originally Posted by __Jamie__

Here is a 6" round on an 8" square, and a 6" square on an 8" round. You can see how one config works fine, and the other one does not.

Ignore the water spots.




(((((((JAMIE)))))))
I'm looking at your water spots icon_eek.gif LOL

Seriously though. I charge $3 per serving for buttercream cakes and about $5 for fondant work. Even though the cake looks small and simple you cannot help the design they pick.. You have to charge accordingly. If they don't have it in their budget offer a buttercream version for a little less. A lot of people don't realize the cost and work there is in fondant.
Another way to save it to use artificial flowers opposed to gumpaste. Or they can supply fresh flowers.

annisa523 Posted 23 Sep 2009 , 6:36am

Since we're in the subject of pricing, I have this very important question,
What about non-wedding tiered cakes? If that was a birthday cake? In May I made a 3 tiered cake for my daughter because I wanted to practice and covered it in fondant. It was a star shape pan and 8" & 6" rounds. Someone asked me how much something like that would cost, I pointed out that it was fondant, and the decorations on it too, I said for sure over a hundred. I'm sure they thought it was a lot.
I've noticed that on the Wilton cake dec books, they give you the break down for how many party servings, and how many wedding servings. ei. an 8" round gives you 20 party serv. or 24 wedding serv. I know I spent my time on my daughters, so even if it's non-wedding cake a lot of cakes can take alot of work- right ladies? just look at all the cakes here at CC.
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