Self Taught....have Fondant Questions!

Decorating By FH_Cakes Updated 21 Sep 2009 , 1:45pm by Babygrlny

FH_Cakes Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 1:43pm
post #1 of 21

So I have done a handful of cakes with Fondant, and so far I have to say it is a pain in the A$$ to roll it out....I think I am doing something wrong. I can start out with a small ball or a large ball and I seem to always be stuck around 12" around. Is it my technique, my roller, what am I doing wrong????

What is the trick to rolling fondant easily?

20 replies
momg9 Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 1:53pm
post #2 of 21

Do you roll it out on a mat? I find that if I don't have enough shortening spread on the mat it won't roll easily. Also rolling from the middle out helps me to get an even thickness.

dsilvest Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 2:10pm
post #3 of 21

Make sure you knead it really well before you start rolling it out. Kneading makes the fondant more elastic.

I just roll it out on my island countertop and use just a bit of ps. Make sure that you rotate it a quarter turn occasionaly. Add more ps if it is starting to stick.

Make sure you form the ball into a disc shape. Flat on top and rounded sides if you are rolling out for a circular cake. If square, I start with a flat square shape.

HamSquad Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 2:19pm
post #4 of 21

I find rolling out fondant very difficult too! I was thinking about trying a PVC pipe. I saw this on a youtube video. I use shortening on a silicon mat. I was thinking it was my wooden rolling pin causing the problem. I don't make enough fondant cake to merrit buying a sheeter(can't afford). I feel it takes forever to roll and cover cakes with fondant.
Hammy

G_Cakes Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 2:36pm
post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by HamSquad

I find rolling out fondant very difficult too! I was thinking about trying a PVC pipe. I saw this on a youtube video. I use shortening on a silicon mat. I was thinking it was my wooden rolling pin causing the problem. I don't make enough fondant cake to merrit buying a sheeter(can't afford). I feel it takes forever to roll and cover cakes with fondant.
Hammy




I heard about using the pvc pipe as well but then found out from the local home depot that some pipes are chemically treated.

So you may want to look into that a little further.

I just caved in and bought the large white silicone roller that wilton makes.

Bu t I also found an excellent restaurant supply in my town that sells the large wooden rolling pin (no handles) and I love it.

Not sure but I think they make it out of butchers block, but it has a great weight to it and is nice and long so I can handle rolling out and moving pieces of fondant up to 24".

The only catch is you need to make sure you have noting in your way when your rolling it out LOL or it will wind up on the floor.

PinkLisa Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 2:41pm
post #6 of 21

What do you find is the advantage of using a rolling pin without handles. Currently I am using a wooden one with handles but it sometimes makes woodgrain marks in my fondant so I want to get a new one and I'm debating on one with handles or without?

momg9 Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 3:00pm
post #7 of 21

I like being able to put a little pressure in the middle of the pin. When I first started using one w/o handles it was a little awkward, but now I really like it.

Loucinda Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 3:03pm
post #8 of 21

I just covered 2 - 14", 2 -10", and 2 - 6" with fondant yesterday. One set was a real cake the other set was dummies, 2 different kinds of fondant, wilton on the dummie, satin ice on the real.

I first warm the fondant in the microwave - about 2 lb. at a time, then smoosh it together and knead it for a few minutes. I use a vinyl mat with shortning on it - (and I prefer a rolling pin with handles, I have the long plastic one, but with the shortning, it gets too slick for me to hold on to). I just start rolling and stop when I get to the size I need.

I did discover it takes MORE satin ice to cover a cake than it does wilton. I don't know if one being a dummy makes a difference or not, but that was an observation I took note of. (I would never put the wilton stuff on a cake that was for consumption though)

I think warming the fondant first helps considerably.

snocilla Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 3:29pm
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Quote:

What do you find is the advantage of using a rolling pin without handles. Currently I am using a wooden one with handles but it sometimes makes woodgrain marks in my fondant so I want to get a new one and I'm debating on one with handles or without?




I have a wooden one with handle and the wilton one without handles. I won't even use the one without handles because it won't roll good, my hands just slide right off. at least with handles , I can hold on to it until the fondant is thinner.

jewelzbakescakes Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 5:05am
post #10 of 21

I have the wilton 20" rolling pin and I really like it. I have also found that since I purchased a sheet of clear vinyl tablecloth to roll it out on it never sticks.

Texas_Rose Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 5:47am
post #11 of 21

I have the big Wilton rolling pin and it's not at all easy to roll with. I do use it for lifting the fondant onto the cake.

I have a Sil-pin that makes rolling fondant really easy. It's a heavy rolling pin with handles, and the rolling surface is silicone. They cost about $40. I saw the red one on clearance on Target's website for $24 last week though. It has ball bearings so that it rolls almost effortlessly.

It also helps to use a big piece of clear vinyl. I used to use the wilton mat but it always made fold marks in my fondant. I use cornstarch on a pastry brush to dust the vinyl and the top of the fondant but it doesn't need much. When you start feeling like it's hard to roll out, dust the top again, flip and dust the underside.

cakenutz Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 6:24am
post #12 of 21

If you buy the pvc pipe made for water pipes it is suppose to be food safe after you remove the red lettering. There is a thread on here somewhere about it.

snocilla Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 9:12am
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Quote:

It also helps to use a big piece of clear vinyl. I used to use the wilton mat but it always made fold marks in my fondant.




Texas Rose - Where do you get a peice of vinyl? Home improvement store? I always have the problem with the folds marks! Thanks for the tip!

grandmom Posted 19 Sep 2009 , 9:44am
post #14 of 21

I followed Sharon Zambito's DVD (Sugarshack) advice and bought a large aluminum rolling pin with handles. The barrel (guess that's what you call it) is 4.5 inches in diameter and is 18 inches long. The thing is huge but very light weight. I bought it from a restaurant supply store, about $25 plus shipping. Worth every penny.

I own half dozen rolling pins (not counting cel sticks, fondant textures, etc.) and this thing has moved to the top of the list for rolling out large rounds of fondant. I still like a smaller one for small pieces, as in for decorations.

Sharon appears to be a small person. She stands up on a stool to work fondant so she can get some weight behind it. Not necessary for me - I'm tall and fat, but this rolling pin is still a great investment. I know it will come in handy for my famous Thanksgiving dinner rolls and pie crusts too!

Oh, and I use a silicone mat, but I'm sure the heavy vinyl from a fabric store will work just as well.

Lou71 Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 2:56pm
post #15 of 21

I have only ever used fondant on cakes. The muscles on your arms do grow icon_smile.gif.

I always put my in the microwave for 10 seconds to soften before I knead it. I knead it for some time before rolling. If you roll out before you have soften enough it will be hard and it will not stretch as much.

I have a long white rolling pin without any handles.

Hope this helps

Louise

icon_smile.gif

Babygrlny Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 3:51pm
post #16 of 21

I am self taught as well. I am just starting to use fondant and sugarpaste. I use the wilton mat with a little ps and the witlon rolling pin and it turned out just fine. My problem is I can't get the sugarpaste to roll out OK. I keep getting air bubbles. Anyone have any suggestions?

Texas_Rose Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 6:01pm
post #17 of 21

Snocilla, the vinyl comes from the fabric store. They sell it on a giant roll. I got mine at Hobby Lobby but if you have a Walmart in your area that still has a fabric department, they sell it too. I have a piece cut to fit my countertop and I leave it out all the time...that's the counter that I always work on, not just cake, but meal prep too, and the vinyl makes it super easy to clean up the counter.

Lou71 Posted 20 Sep 2009 , 7:10pm
post #18 of 21

If you get many air bubbles in your fondant, look at how you are kneading the fondat. If you fold it over and round and over method (like bread making) you are adding air to the fondant.

Louise x

Babygrlny Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 2:08am
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou71

If you get many air bubbles in your fondant, look at how you are kneading the fondat. If you fold it over and round and over method (like bread making) you are adding air to the fondant.

Louise x





Louise, it's not the fondant that I have a problem with it's the sugarpaste. I tried to flatten it before I rolled it out and still had air bubbles. I guess it doesn't matter too much because when it dried it looked fine but it was just really hard to work with.

Texas_Rose Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 2:10am
post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by babygrlny

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou71

If you get many air bubbles in your fondant, look at how you are kneading the fondat. If you fold it over and round and over method (like bread making) you are adding air to the fondant.

Louise x




Louise, it's not the fondant that I have a problem with it's the sugarpaste. I tried to flatten it before I rolled it out and still had air bubbles. I guess it doesn't matter too much because when it dried it looked fine but it was just really hard to work with.




Sugarpaste and fondant are the same thing. Sugarpaste is a UK term for fondant.

Maybe you meant gumpaste?

Babygrlny Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 1:45pm
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

Quote:
Originally Posted by babygrlny

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou71

If you get many air bubbles in your fondant, look at how you are kneading the fondat. If you fold it over and round and over method (like bread making) you are adding air to the fondant.

Louise x




Louise, it's not the fondant that I have a problem with it's the sugarpaste. I tried to flatten it before I rolled it out and still had air bubbles. I guess it doesn't matter too much because when it dried it looked fine but it was just really hard to work with.



Sugarpaste and fondant are the same thing. Sugarpaste is a UK term for fondant.

Maybe you meant gumpaste?





Oh yes sorry...I had a roungh week. I meant to say gumpaste.

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