Fruit Filled Fondant Cakes

Decorating By requel Updated 18 Sep 2009 , 1:10am by MJoycake

requel Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 5:41pm
post #1 of 10

Okay Guy's,
do you put your fruit filled fondant cakes in the fridge? even if these are cooked first I need to know don't they sweat if they go in to the fridge how do you deal with these for a wedding cake? please help?

9 replies
Bluehue Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 6:10pm
post #2 of 10

Not sure where you are requel, but when you say *fruit filled cake* do you mean.......

Fruit cake- as in a traditional Christmas Cake
or
A cake mix with added fruit to it...as in peaches, apple, etc?

I never put my Fruit Cakes in the fridge - because they contain Brandy/Whisky they don't need to go into the fridge.
They can be kept for up to 3 months wrapped in oven back paper and then cling wrap in your pantery for up to 3 months.
This is the type of Fruit Cake we make for weddings -

On the other hand - if you are talking sponge cake - with a fruit filling - i would think that unless wrapped in cling wrap - it would dry out in the fridge - haven't had to make this sort of cake with fruit in it....
Someone will be along shortly hopefully to give you advise on this part of your question...


Bluehue
icon_smile.gif

Rylan Posted 16 Sep 2009 , 7:42pm
post #3 of 10

I agree with everything that Bluehue said.

I just want to add that in my personal opinion, anything that has fruit in it should be refrigerated.

Bluehue Posted 17 Sep 2009 , 3:06am
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylan

I agree with everything that Bluehue said.

I just want to add that in my personal opinion, anything that has fruit in it should be refrigerated.




And yet we are taught to keep them wrapped in either brown paper or oven bake paper and then a few layers of cling wrap and hide them away in your pantry for a few months in a cake tin so as they can *mature*.

Due to the Brandy/Whisky and long slow cooking process the fruit has more or less been cured - and thus no longer need refrigeration.

I have two fruit cakes in my pantry that have been there for a few months now - and i ust went and had a peek - and yes, all is good - and the smell is devine - still moist and looking healthy - thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gificon_lol.gif

True Rylan - everybody has their certain ways of doing things and different ways of being taught... just a case of what ever works for the individual i guess.

Bluehue. icon_smile.gif

Rylan Posted 17 Sep 2009 , 3:11am
post #5 of 10

Let me correct what I said. The fruit cakes (traditional X-mas cake) are fine on the counter but what the OP is referring to in my opinion should be refrigerated.

Bluehue Posted 17 Sep 2009 , 3:17am
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylan

Let me correct what I said. The fruit cakes (traditional X-mas cake) are fine on the counter but what the OP is referring to in my opinion should be refrigerated.




icon_redface.gif - that will teach me to read more slowly - icon_redface.gif
I just went back and re-read your first post - and yes - it made perfect sense - it just didn't sink in to my caking brain cells - icon_redface.gificon_lol.gif

Bluehue. icon_smile.gif

Rylan Posted 17 Sep 2009 , 3:40am
post #7 of 10

Bluehue, no harm done =].

Bluehue Posted 17 Sep 2009 , 3:44am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylan

Bluehue, no harm done =].






thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif
Bh

requel Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 12:53am
post #9 of 10

Thanks for the response guys but I meant cakes with fruit fillings.

MJoycake Posted 18 Sep 2009 , 1:10am
post #10 of 10

I believe homemade fruit fillings or jams/jellies with no preservatives that require refrigeration after opening need to go in the fridge. However, the bags of pastry fillings that you can buy say that because of the preservatives added, they do not require refrigeration once they're in the cake. Hope that helps.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%