Help!! What's Going On Here???

Decorating By AngieD300 Updated 21 Sep 2009 , 5:43pm by luvmysmoother

AngieD300 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 11:32am
post #1 of 13

hello...i've attached a photo of a cake i just did. I'm not sure why my fondant cracks, but every now and then it does. Also, i can't understand why i get "bulges" on the side of my cake.
Now, i'm not sure if it's because the fondant is drying out, but i always kept a thin layer of shortening on my hands & work mat as i worked with the fondant. I tried not to roll it out too thin either.
Now, the bulges aren't because of too much filling because this cake has no filling except a thin layer of icing (no filling wanted). I crumb coat it & i'm wondering if the bulge is the little bit of icing that filled in the areas between layers.
I really appreciate any help with this...i hate that my cakes look "crumby" (ok, that was bad)
Thanks...Ang
LL

12 replies
leepat Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 11:49am
post #2 of 13

Your cakes are settling. Causing the fondant to bulge at the bottom which will cause that cracking. Allow your cakes to set for a couple of hours before you cover them with fondant and that should take care of it in the future. The best you could do now is to try to cover it with a border.

paolacaracas Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 11:50am
post #3 of 13

Seems to me it has to do with the quality of the fondant> It's very weird cause fodant craks when it's to dry, and bulges like that when is too soft. It can be both at the same time!. What fondant you are using?

AngieD300 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 12:14pm
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by paolacaracas

Seems to me it has to do with the quality of the fondant> It's very weird cause fodant craks when it's to dry, and bulges like that when is too soft. It can be both at the same time!. What fondant you are using?





Well, i'm using Satin Ice. I used to have a heck of time when i first starting using fondant & using corn starch/confectionary sugar to keep it from sticking, but that really made it dry. Now, i use a little shortening & its so easy to work with now. I recently used the shortening w/Satin Ice's brown/chocolate fondant & it was amazing...smooth as butter & silky.

As for the bulging, i'm not sure if the settling is the issue because it sat for a few hours to let the crumb coat set, which i put a very thin, thin layer. i learned my lesson about thick crumb coat that would make icing pockets. Well, this was my first official cake & i'm learning. Thanks for the advice & tips!!!

all4cake Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 12:37pm
post #5 of 13

It looks like the sides of the cake layers had ledges that when crumb coated got evened out (as opposed to trimming the sides of the cake smooth before crumb coating). Then, the fondant was applied and weighed the icing that filled the ledges(only takes a smidge of a build up)down. The crackly area happens to me when I don't knead the fondant enough before rolling it out as well as sometimes when I use the greased mat method(I think I grease it too heavily at times...).

Lou71 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 12:45pm
post #6 of 13

a couple of tips if this helps:

When crumb coating I always put cake in fridge for 30 minutes before doing and then 30 minutes after. This allows me to smooth the butter icing before adding the fondant.

If there is bubbles in the fondat, then review how you are softening the fondat. In some cases you could be adding air into the fondant before rolling. If it is a big piece of fondant, stick it in the microwave for 10 seconds and this will allow you to work with it.

If the fondant is drying out too quickly (cracks), there is two options for this, either you have not softened enough or it is drying out too quick, stick in microwave for 5 seconds and then re-knead.

If layering, do not put the cream near the edges as this will cause it to ooze out when you put another layer on and icing. Leave a small gap.

When putting the fondant on the cake, place on top and ensure the top and sides are okay and then always smooth up. If you smooth down, it could tear at top and also smooth the butter cream down to the bottom.

Looking at the picture it looks like heat and too much crumb coating.

Hope this helps.

Louise

AngieD300 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 2:00pm
post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou71

a couple of tips if this helps:

When crumb coating I always put cake in fridge for 30 minutes before doing and then 30 minutes after. This allows me to smooth the butter icing before adding the fondant.

If there is bubbles in the fondat, then review how you are softening the fondat. In some cases you could be adding air into the fondant before rolling. If it is a big piece of fondant, stick it in the microwave for 10 seconds and this will allow you to work with it.

If the fondant is drying out too quickly (cracks), there is two options for this, either you have not softened enough or it is drying out too quick, stick in microwave for 5 seconds and then re-knead.

If layering, do not put the cream near the edges as this will cause it to ooze out when you put another layer on and icing. Leave a small gap.

When putting the fondant on the cake, place on top and ensure the top and sides are okay and then always smooth up. If you smooth down, it could tear at top and also smooth the butter cream down to the bottom.

Looking at the picture it looks like heat and too much crumb coating.

Hope this helps.

Louise




Great advice...i did learn, the hard way, about sticking the cake in the fridge after crumb coating. However, heat may have been an issue. i live in Florida & it's hot no matter what. I also learned, the very hard way, not to put too much crumb coating...it was very thin. Even the sections between the layers were very small, so there wasnt too much icing that got into the sections. maybe the weight of the fondant, just squeezed what ever little icing was in the creases between layers.
Now, i do remember working that fondant out like crazy, but hearing popping sounds, like bubble gum, so that could have caused some bubbles (i had to pop those). So, i'll have to try microwaving. Yet, i did find that working w/a small amount of Crisco on the hands, really prevented the fondant from sticking to my hands/gloves/mat, better than constantly having to sprinkle corn starch/confectionary sugar.
again, i really appreciate the help...maybe soon, i'll provide a full picture of my cakes icon_smile.gif

peg818 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 2:53pm
post #8 of 13

Are you using a soft cake?? I'm thinking it might be that the cake is to soft add to it the heat and the weight of the fondant, i could see it bunching at the bottom of the cake like that.

Did you have a chance to examine this cake after it was cut? That would tell you if the bottom layer of cake couldn't support the weight of the next layer and the fondant.

AngieD300 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 3:08pm
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by peg818

Are you using a soft cake?? I'm thinking it might be that the cake is to soft add to it the heat and the weight of the fondant, i could see it bunching at the bottom of the cake like that.

Did you have a chance to examine this cake after it was cut? That would tell you if the bottom layer of cake couldn't support the weight of the next layer and the fondant.




Hmmm...good point. well, the bottom layer did stick out just a little, so i tried to "carve" it to match the othe layers. Since i don't have great carving skills, i ended up carving a little too much. Any bit more & it would have the been the beginning of a topsy-turvy cake...LOL. Thank you!!

AngieD300 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 3:10pm
post #10 of 13

What do you think about crumbing coating a cake before freezing it...in the event you have to freeze a cake a few days before decorating it?

peg818 Posted 14 Sep 2009 , 4:27pm
post #11 of 13

I don't know anything about freezing, as i don't freeze any cake. That would require freezer space that i just don't have

Lou71 Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 9:45am
post #12 of 13

I have only freezed a cake before crumb coating. When I take it out of the freezer I let it thaw a little and then crumb coat. The BC sometimes starts to freeze because the cake is still cold but this is okay as this will allow me to smooth the sides fo the cake without having any crumbs.

Louise

luvmysmoother Posted 21 Sep 2009 , 5:43pm
post #13 of 13

I seem to have nothing but fondant problems when I use shortening either in the ingredients or to work and roll the fondant - this is just my experience though. I also found that if I used a thin consistency icing - also have problems. Seems like the thickest consistency icing I can deal with and only a thin layer of it works great at making the fondant easier to manage once it's on the cakeicon_smile.gif

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