Thanksgiving Leaf....

Decorating By yiyo21 Updated 13 Sep 2009 , 4:11pm by tonedna

yiyo21 Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 11:45pm
post #1 of 15

does anyone knows where can i get a thanksgiving leaf molds for fondant or if is it a way to do it by piping??
I know we are not quite yet but better to be prepared than sorry right?

14 replies
Win Posted 12 Sep 2009 , 11:57pm
post #2 of 15

A lot of leaf "molds" are associated with the flower to which they belong. In other words, you see grape leaf molds, and peony leaf molds, etc. For fall/autumn leaves, I use cookie cutters and a veiner. That way, I can make each of my leaves different just as in nature. There are a lot of autumn leaf sets in cookie cutters as well as individual.

HTH!

pattycakesnj Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 12:00am
post #3 of 15

I too use cookie cutter leaves and then just vein them, works great

yiyo21 Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 12:09am
post #4 of 15

thanks!!!

joknee Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 12:16am
post #5 of 15

Is there a tutorial somewhere on veining? I have the cookie cutters but would love to have leaves look more natural.Thanks
Joan

Win Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 1:18am
post #6 of 15

You can purchase veiners at places like Global Sugar Art or Country Kitchen Sweet Art (my two personal favs.) On things like leaves, I roll my fondant or gumpaste very thin, then I press on the veiner. I cut out the leaf shape last. That way, I have not cut out the leaf and then distorted its shape by pressing too hard with the veiner. Others cut the leaf, lay it on the veiner and press with their thumbs to get the same results.

http://www.countrykitchensa.com/catalog/mini.aspx?T=1&ShopId=38&CatId=527&SubCatId=229

kakeladi Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 1:51pm
post #7 of 15

Many leaves can be veined by using corn husks. Let the husk from ears of corn dry - press flat lightly - lay your fondant &/or gp on it and lightly but firmly press.
To dry them for a more natural look crumple paper, foil, or such and lay the leaves on to dry.
Another way to make very natural looking leaves if to cut them from wafer (sometimes called rice) paper. Color them w/an airbrush 1st; allow to dry then carefully cut w/scissors. Once airbrushed they do become somewhat brittle so you do have to be careful cutting them. The airbrushing also makes the wafer paper buckle so they have that natural look. See examples in my pix.

mjk350 Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 2:29pm
post #8 of 15

Are veiners just for gumpaste or can you use them with fondant and marshmallow fondant?

Texas_Rose Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 3:10pm
post #9 of 15

You can use veiners with fondant and marshmallow fondant too.

All of the fall leaves I've ever made were made with marshmallow fondant so they could be eaten. I usually just use a fondant tool and draw the veins on, then when the leaf is dry, paint it with gel color mixed with vodka. It sits in the veins I drew and emphasizes them, while adding to the overall look of the leaf.

Michaels has fall leaf cutters now. It's a set for $7 that has three sizes each of acorns, maple leaves, and oak leaves. I bought it last year (at Walmart for $4) and got a lot of use out of the leaves but not the acorns.

mjk350 Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 3:25pm
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

You can use veiners with fondant and marshmallow fondant too.

All of the fall leaves I've ever made were made with marshmallow fondant so they could be eaten. I usually just use a fondant tool and draw the veins on, then when the leaf is dry, paint it with gel color mixed with vodka. It sits in the veins I drew and emphasizes them, while adding to the overall look of the leaf.

Michaels has fall leaf cutters now. It's a set for $7 that has three sizes each of acorns, maple leaves, and oak leaves. I bought it last year (at Walmart for $4) and got a lot of use out of the leaves but not the acorns.




Thanks so much for the info. I did get the same leaf cutters last year too, and did not get to use them yet. I still need to try doing the flooding. I have so much to learn. Thanks icon_smile.gif

Texas_Rose Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 3:36pm
post #11 of 15

When I used the leaf cutters for cookies, I just marbled fondant in fall colors and made cutouts that I stuck on top of the cookies. Really easy and looked really neat too.

mjk350 Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 3:56pm
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

When I used the leaf cutters for cookies, I just marbled fondant in fall colors and made cutouts that I stuck on top of the cookies. Really easy and looked really neat too.




Do you know how long you can actually keep marshmallow fondant?

Texas_Rose Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 4:00pm
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjk350

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

When I used the leaf cutters for cookies, I just marbled fondant in fall colors and made cutouts that I stuck on top of the cookies. Really easy and looked really neat too.



Do you know how long you can actually keep marshmallow fondant?




On the cookie or in general?

I keep it on cookies for a week, freeze if storing them longer.

I keep marshmallow fondant at room temp for a week. To store longer, wrap in plastic wrap, put in ziplock bag, wrap bag in foil (if your freezer has freezer taste like mine) and store for as long as you need it.

I've noticed if I keep MMF for longer than a week at room temp, it starts to develop a sour smell. My mom, on the other hand, has saved sugar cookies that I made for up to a month and then eaten them and said they tasted fine, both the cookie and the fondant.

mjk350 Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 4:04pm
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

Quote:
Originally Posted by mjk350

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas_Rose

When I used the leaf cutters for cookies, I just marbled fondant in fall colors and made cutouts that I stuck on top of the cookies. Really easy and looked really neat too.



Do you know how long you can actually keep marshmallow fondant?



On the cookie or in general?

I keep it on cookies for a week, freeze if storing them longer.

I keep marshmallow fondant at room temp for a week. To store longer, wrap in plastic wrap, put in ziplock bag, wrap bag in foil (if your freezer has freezer taste like mine) and store for as long as you need it.

I've noticed if I keep MMF for longer than a week at room temp, it starts to develop a sour smell. My mom, on the other hand, has saved sugar cookies that I made for up to a month and then eaten them and said they tasted fine, both the cookie and the fondant.




Thanks so much.

tonedna Posted 13 Sep 2009 , 4:11pm
post #15 of 15

I made this cake years ago.

http://www.cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=gallery&file=displayimage&pid=1012013

I use a fall leaf cookie cutter and this mold

http://designmeacake.com/catalog/c3_p1.html
The gumpaste started in a golden yellow and I hand painted some oranges and green with petal dust. They can be airbrush too.
Edna icon_smile.gif

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